Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.; More Booth!

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 22: John Held, Jr.

I know, I know… you woke up this morning wondering if John Held, Jr., who became famous for his drawings of flappers in and on the cover of the pre-Luce Life ever did advertising work.  Well courtesy of Warren Bernard‘s detective work, we have some examples of Mr. Held’s commercial work. My thanks to Mr. Bernard for sharing his findings with Ink Spill.

New Yorker readers who have dipped into the magazine’s cartoon anthologies or looked through ancient issues would certainly have come across Mr. Held’s work — but it wasn’t the style that brought him fame. His New Yorker work looks like this:

  Harold Ross, the New Yorker‘s founder and first editor (who met Held in high school when they both worked on the school newspaper,The Red and Black)  wanted Held in his new magazine, but he didn’t want Held’s famous flapper style work. According to Thomas Kunkel, in his magnificent biography of Ross, Genius in Disguise:

“Ross and [Rea] Irvin eschewed his [Held’s] overexposed flappers, instead publishing his contemporary twists on the Gay Nineties woodcuts Ross had loved as a boy.”

So what you see here are examples of Held’s non-New Yorker style. The Ovington Gift Shop ad was published during the heart of the Roaring 20s (1926), and the others were published in 1929 — the year that ended so badly.

Here’s John Held, Jr.’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

John Held, Jr. (Pictured above. Source: Sketchbook of American Humorists, 1938) Born, January 10, 1889, Salt Lake City, Utah. Died, 1958, Belmar, New Jersey. New Yorker work: April 11, 1925 – Sept. 17, 1932.

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More Booth!

Mike Lynch and Jane Mattimoe have posted pieces about the wonderful George Booth exhibit at The Society of Illustrators.  The exhibit, as you can see in the poster, is up now and will run through the end of this year. Do not miss!

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Live; Obscure Otto Soglow; Book of Interest: Cartoons From Maine; Drawing Dogs w/ Booth

New Yorker Cartoonists Live

Event of interest tomorrow night! This just posted on Instagram a few hours ago by the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen:

 Emily Flake, Jeremy Nguyen and Farley Katz will join Ms. Allen at Dover Street Market. Somebody who’s going please take photos and send to the Spill.

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Obscure Otto Soglow

Stephen Nadler, over at Attempted Bloggery, has posted a rarity: an Otto Soglow cover for Broadcasting: The Weekly News Magazine of Radio, dated March 24, 1941.  Above is a snippet.  To see the whole thing go here.

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Book of Interest: Cartoons From Maine

It’s a long way off (due out in May of 2018) but here’s the cover for a collection of cartoons about Maine by Maine cartoonists, edited by Mike Lynch.

 The contributors: Bill Woodman, David Jacobson, John Klossner, Mike Lynch, and Jeff Pert

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Drawing Dogs with Booth

From The Paris Review, “Drawing Dogs in George Booth’s Living Room”  — this fun piece about Sandra Boynton drawing with Mr. Booth.

 

 

Must See: George Booth Exhibit at The Society of Illustrators

Here are a bunch of photos taken at last night’s opening reception for The Society of Illustrators exhibit, George Booth: A Cartoonist’s Life, curated by J.J. Sedelmaier

A ton of original George Booth covers and drawings in one place. What more could anyone ask for?  It’s a wonderful show. Go see it.

Above left, Danny Shanahan with Seth Fleishman (and right behind Mr. Fleishman is Stephen Nadler who runs Attempted Bloggery). Photo right: seated, John Cuneo, with the Director of the Society of Illustrators, Anelle Miller. Behind them is Felipe Galindo, and Stephen Nadler speaking with the cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey.

Below: two similar group photos. Can you spot the difference?

Top group photo: Mike Lynch, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly, Danny Shanahan, Jane Mattimoe, Felipe Galindo, George Booth, Mort Gerberg, Sam Gross, Ellis Rosen and Hilary Campbell.In the second group photo, Mike Lynch has disappeared and been replaced by John Cuneo, who is between Liza Donnelly and Danny Shanahan).

Below right: Seth Fleishman and the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Below: animator, Bill Plympton. Right: Eric Lewis

Above left: the show’s curator, J.J. Sedelmaier. Right: the Booth family

Below: Mike Lynch with Gina Kovarsky, daughter of the late very great New Yorker cartoonist and cover artist, Anatol Kovarsky

(photo courtesy of Mike Lynch)

Below: George Booth, with the illustrator,Tom Bloom in the background — he’s the fellow with the beard. (This photo courtesy of Stephen Nadler). 

Above left: Sam Gross.  Above right: Felipe Galindo with Colin Stokes, the New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor.

Below: Liza Donnelly, George Booth

 

–All photos above by Liza Donnelly, except where noted. My thanks to her for being the Spill’s official photographer.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fave Book Find of the Week: Frueh On The Theatre: 1906 – 1962; Sam Marlow Pencilled; New Yorker Cartoonists in Life & Judge; Signed By The Cartoonist; Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker!

Here’s a wonderful collection of the late great Al Frueh’s theater work for The New Yorker and elsewhere. The New York Times had Al Hirschfeld, The New Yorker had Al Frueh.  Mr. Frueh’s New Yorker colleague, Brendan Gill provides an informative and insightful intro. For more on Mr. Frueh, here’s a Spill piece about him, “The First New Yorker Cartoon” — posted way back in 2011.

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Sam Marlow Pencilled

Sam Marlow, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker May 9, 2016 is the latest subject of Jane Mattimoe’s splendid Case For Pencils blog.  See Mr. Marlow’s tools of the trade here.

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Buchanan’s Files Continue on Mike Lynch’s Site

If New Yorker cartoonists work not published in the New Yorker is your thing, then head on over to Mike Lynch’s site where you’ll find a number of Life and Judge cartoons from the 1930s. All the scans courtesy of Dick Buchanan, including the Ned Hilton drawing above (Life, 1935). Mr. Hilton’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from May 19, 1934 — June 15, 1957.

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Signed By The Cartoonist

Stephen Nagler’s Attempted Bloggery site has been posting signed books by some famous cartoonists, Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, and William Steig among them.  Check them out here.

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Reading Every New Yorker

And speaking of Ms. Hokinson, here’s her beautiful New Yorker cover from the summer of 1928.  The fascinating blog, A New Yorker State of Mind takes a very close look within.  Read it here.

Thurber’s Dogs Set to Music; The Spill Responds to a Response; Time Traveling: Saturday Evening Post Cartoons From the 1950s

Thurber’s Dogs Set to Music

Attempted Bloggery has posted this curio: Thurber’s Dogs set to the music of Peter Schickele.  Until yesterday, I’d never heard of this. 

It’s not the first time Thurber’s work has crossed over from print to music. In one of the many high points of Thurber’s career, his best-seller, The Thurber Carnival was transformed into a  a very successful playwith Thurber himself taking the stage. 

A soundtrack for the show was issued –it includes a booklet of his drawings.

The play won a Special Tony Award in 1960.  Video exists of Thurber accepting the award (with Burgess Meredith). You can see it here (Thurber takes the stage at the 25:50 mark).

 

 

 

 

 

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Blog of Interest

In response to The Spill‘s mention of Arnold Zwicky’s Blog the other day,  Mr. Zwicky posted this on his site:

“Note from Michael Maslin on his Inkspill blog (“New Yorker Cartoonists News and Events”), appearing as a comment on a recent posting of mine here:

As you see, Mr. Zwicky’s blog is “mostly about language”; when it’s about the language of New Yorker cartoons it will be mentioned here

This could get burdensome. I’ve posted here over a hundred times about New Yorker cartoons and covers; these are indexed in a Page on this blog, with subpages for (so far) 25 specific artists…”

Ink Spill’s response to Mr. Zwicky’s response:

Dear Mr. Zwicky,

It is a burden The Spill will happily bear.

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Time-Traveling: Saturday Evening Post Cartoons From the 1950s

Mike Lynch’s has posted Eisenhower-era  Saturday Evening Post cartoons (and a few that appeared in Collier’s) including this one from the late great New Yorker cartoonist,  Barney Tobey.

Here’s Mr. Tobey’s A-Z entry on the Spill:

Barney Tobey (photo above from Think Small, a book of humor produced by Volkswagon) Born in New York City, July, 18, 1906, died March 27, 1989, New York. New Yorker work: 1929 -1986. Essential collection: B. Tobey of The New Yorker (Dodd Mead & Co., 1983)

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Note:  An exhibit of Bob Mankoff’s work will run from July 20 through Oct. 20 at the Charles P. Sifton Gallery in the Theodore Roosevelt United States Courthouse in Brooklyn.

 

 

 

 

George Booth: Model; Michael Crawford’s Maps; Roz Chast’s National Book Festival Poster

George Booth: Model

The cartoonist , Mike Lynch has recently turned up an issue of Leatherneck (October, 1951) with George Booth on the cover.  Sarah Booth has confirmed that is indeed her father having his helmet painted, telling the Spill, “I’d know that  look of mischief anywhere!”

According to Lee Lorenz’s  The Essential George Booth (Workman, 1998), Mr. Booth, who had enlisted as a Marine in 1944, re-inlisted and joined the Leatherneck staff in 1946, contributing  cartoons,  spots, spreads, and covers.  In a 1998, he told The New Yorker’s David Owen (for a Booth Profile) that Leatherneck was “a global magazine, and a very good one. It was slick. It gave me my start, and I got to work with some top professionals. It was really better than any school I could have gone to, and I learned a lot.” 

Above: Booth on the cover, and below, a Booth cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Michael Crawford’s Maps

From newyorker.com’s Culture Desk, July 4, 2017,  “Michael Crawford’s Mixed-Up U.S.A.”

Matt Dellinger, the late Mr. Crawford’s friend, introduces us to a slide show of unusual maps.

 

 

 

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Roz Chast’s National Book Festival Poster

From finebooksmagazine.com, July 6, 2017, “Cartoonist Roz Chast Designs National Book Festival Poster”

Ms. Chast, in a press release:

“I wanted to make a poster that expressed the excitement, appreciation, and delight I have for the books of my life.”