Addams Family Collaboration; Steinberg biography one of the NYTs 100 Notable Books of 2012; Interview: Mick Stevens; Toronto Group Photo

 

From the blog, Little Gothic Horrors, November 30, 2012,“An Addams Family Collaboration”

 

 

Deidre Bair’s Saul Steinberg: A Biography (Nan A.Talese/Doubleday) has been named one of The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2012.

 

 

From nudistnaturistamerica, November 29, 2012, “Naked Cartoons and Censorship”, Mick Stevens revisits his dots in this interview.

 

From boingboing, November 29, 2012, “Cartoonist Group Photo in Toronto Restaurant” — this fun photo includes, among others,  Seth, Charles Burns, Adrian Tomine, and Chris Ware (whose Building Stories was just named one of the year’s 10 Best Books of 2012 by The New York Times).

 

 

 

A Holiday Cartoon Book Roundup

With the holidays approaching, this seems a good time to mention some of The New Yorker cartoon-related books that have appeared on Ink Spill this year.

 

 

 

Cartoon Monarch: Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW Publishing) Introduction by Ivan Brunetti, Foreward by Jared Gardner

From the Ink Spill review in March of this year: What’s not to like about this handsome volume? If I had my way every cartoonist of note would celebrated thusly: beautifully reproduced work (both black & white and color), with a thorough and informed foreward.

 

 

 

The Receptionist: An Education at The New Yorker by Janet Groth (Algonquin Books)

Comings and goings on at The New Yorker in the latter part of William Shawn’s reign as editor, with mentions of cartoonists and famous contributors such as Charles Addams, J.D. Salinger, Joe Mitchell and Woody Allen.

 

 

 

The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs (Random House)

This is a beautiful book, chock full of art  (covers & cartoons) as well as hefty contributions by many of the magazine’s writers.  A bonus: the book is Thurber heavy — and that’s never a bad thing.

 

 

 

 

I Really Should Be Drawing: The Blook by Mick Stevens (an e-book)

From one of the funniest cartoonists in modern times, this e-book, available through Lulu.com

 

 

The Resistance: A Thriller  by Peter Steiner (Minotaur Books)

Steiner’s fourth book in the Louis Morgon series.

  “Brilliant, evocative, elegiac, and suffused with sadness. . . . The Resistance is a powerful and beautiful reminder of Faulkner’s dictum that the only thing truly worth writing about is ‘the human heart in conflict with itself’.” –Booklist, starred review.

 

 

 

After the Fall: A Novel by Victoria Roberts (W.W. Norton & Co.)

From the ever-wonderful Victoria Roberts, this illustrated novel.

 After the Fall is one of a kind. With her distinctive, intelligent drawings and tongue-in-cheek humor, legendary cartoonist Victoria Roberts has crafted a delightfully quirky coming-of-age fantasy for adults. I couldn’t put it down.” (Patricia Bosworth, Vanity Fair Contributing Editor and author of Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman )

 

 

 

Steinberg: A Biography by Deirdre Bair (Doubleday/Nan A. Talese)

An excerpt from the Publishers Weekly review:

“The pre-eminent New Yorker cartoonist leads a life worthy of his own ironic art in this scintillating biography … Steinberg emerges as a tangle of neurotic contradictions … Bair’s long and amply researched biography unfolds in a graceful prose that’s stocked with absurdist scenes and colorful characters…”

 

 

No Man Is a Desert Island by Felipe Galindo Feggo (Jorge Pinto Books) A classic collection of cartoons by the multi-talented artist and cartoonist. 

 

 

Marco Goes to School by Roz Chast (Atheneum Books for Young Readers) 

An excerpt from The New York Times review:

“It’s never too early to expose your child to the joys of Chast’s wobbly-inked humor, and winning converts will be easy with this latest tale (after “Too Busy Marco”) about the dimwitted parrot…”

 

 

 

 

Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers you Were Never Meant to See by Francoise Mouly (Abrams)

The New Yorker’s Art editor gives us a behind-the-scenes look at art that didn’t make the cut.

 

 

 

Last but not least, The New Yorker’s Cartoons of the Year 2012 — a bookazine. Hundreds of cartoons culled from the past year.  With an Introduction by the magazine’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff.


 

 

Cartoon Auction includes work by Charles Addams, Geoge Booth, and William Steig

From the Kingston (NY) Daily Freeman, “Art auction in Rhinecliff Saturday”

this news of a benefit auction of cartoons, including work by New Yorker artists  Charles Addams, George Booth, William Steig, Frank Modell, James Stevenson, Peter Steiner, Lee Lorenz, Harry Bliss, Barbara Smaller, Charles Barsotti, Joe Dator, Gahan Wilson, Robert Mankoff, Liza Donnelly, P.C. Vey, Roz Chast, Danny Shanahan, Carolita Johnson, Edward Frascino, Michael Crawford, Zachary Kanin, Pat Byrnes, Mick Stevens, David Sipress, Raymond Davidson, Robert Weber, Jason Polan, Henry Martin, and more.
In addition to the auction, a signed Charles Addams print will be raffled.

Link here to the Morton Memorial Library

 

 

Mick Stevens’ dots, Facebook and The New Yorker

 

By now the whoop-dee-doo over Facebook’s temporary shutdown of The New Yorker’s Facebook page over a cartoon (seen above) by Mick Stevens has been covered by a multitude of sites.  If you missed the story check out  these posts: first, the New Yorker’s cartoon editor’s blog,  this Daily News post, and finally, this post from The Daily Mail (UK).

 

The Daily News article mentions that several websites were under the impression that Stevens’ redrawn clothed Adam and Eve cartoon (above) was an effort by The New Yorker to appease Facebook.  Ink Spill contacted the cartoonist today and asked how the second drawing came about and what its intention was. So, here’s Mick Stevens, with the last word on what he calls “those dots.”

“Bob [Mankoff] emailed me when the Facebook thing happened and asked me if I would do a version with Adam and Eve clothed, just for contrast and for use in a possible future blog…some folks got the idea though that we did the second version to satisfy our new censors at Facebook, which isn’t the case.”

 

Anatomy of The New Yorker’s Pig at the Complaint Department Cartoon

 

 

 

This week a familiar cartoon showed up on the The New Yorker’s last page as part of its continuing Caption Contest. The cartoon, of a pig at a complaint department, was drawn by Mick Stevens,  who has been contributing cartoons to The New Yorker for thirty four years .

 

Why was the cartoon familiar? Fans of the classic sitcom, Seinfeld, remember the episode “The Cartoon” (it aired January 29,1998) in which Elaine, inspired to submit a cartoon to The New Yorker, stays up all night working on cartoon ideas and finally comes up with the pig at the complaint department. (The New Yorker’s current cartoon editor, Bob Mankoff recently delved into the episode in great detail on his blog). In the episode, as Elaine hands her sketchbook to Jerry, we catch a glimpse of her pig cartoon.

 

So how did Elaine’s cartoon end up in this week’s New Yorker, some fourteen years after it appeared on television?

 

 

For clarity’s sake, Elaine’s cartoon – the one we see on her sketchpad, is not the cartoon in the current New Yorker. In an email conversation I asked Mick how he came to draw Elaine’s cartoon, and he wrote:

 

Bob [Mankoff] asked me to draw it up for a possible caption contest and/or use in his blog in reference to the Seinfeld episode.

 

I also asked Mick if he referenced Elaine’s cartoon, as there’s an undeniable similarity between the two.

 

I didn’t look at the Seinfeld cartoon first but it turned out to be similar.

 

Curious about the original cartoon that appears on Elaine’s sketchbook, I asked Bruce Eric Kaplan, the New Yorker cartoonist who wrote the Seinfeld episode, if he drew the cartoon we see on Elaine’s sketchpad.  I also asked if he still had the original – I thought it would be fun to post on Ink Spill.  Bruce replied in an email:

 

I didn’t draw it!

They asked me to but I didn’t want to.

Someone in the art department did it.

I don’t know who has it or if it still exists!

 

You might wonder why this flurry of detective work on my part about a brand new version of a fourteen year old drawing of a pig. Much like Elaine’s pig, I have a complaint.  A number of news stories that appeared following the publication of Mick’s version of Elaine’s cartoon,  such as appeared on Gawker and Yahoo News suggest that The New Yorker has “republished” Elaine’s cartoon. Hmmm, maybe I should write them a letter…

 

Dear Gawker and Yahoo News:

 

I really enjoy your sites – I’m a fan! – but Elaine is a fictional character who submitted her drawing to a fictional New Yorker.  The real New Yorker never published Elaine’s cartoon.

Regards,

Michael Maslin

 

Many other sites ( and there are many) tell us that Mick’s cartoon is “the same one” or in at least one case “the very same one” as seen in the Seinfeld episode.

Well, no, actually it isn’t.