George Booth: Model; Michael Crawford’s Maps; Roz Chast’s National Book Festival Poster

George Booth: Model

The cartoonist , Mike Lynch has recently turned up an issue of Leatherneck (October, 1951) with George Booth on the cover.  Sarah Booth has confirmed that is indeed her father having his helmet painted, telling the Spill, “I’d know that  look of mischief anywhere!”

According to Lee Lorenz’s  The Essential George Booth (Workman, 1998), Mr. Booth, who had enlisted as a Marine in 1944, re-inlisted and joined the Leatherneck staff in 1946, contributing  cartoons,  spots, spreads, and covers.  In a 1998, he told The New Yorker’s David Owen (for a Booth Profile) that Leatherneck was “a global magazine, and a very good one. It was slick. It gave me my start, and I got to work with some top professionals. It was really better than any school I could have gone to, and I learned a lot.” 

Above: Booth on the cover, and below, a Booth cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Michael Crawford’s Maps

From newyorker.com’s Culture Desk, July 4, 2017,  “Michael Crawford’s Mixed-Up U.S.A.”

Matt Dellinger, the late Mr. Crawford’s friend, introduces us to a slide show of unusual maps.

 

 

 

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Roz Chast’s National Book Festival Poster

From finebooksmagazine.com, July 6, 2017, “Cartoonist Roz Chast Designs National Book Festival Poster”

Ms. Chast, in a press release:

“I wanted to make a poster that expressed the excitement, appreciation, and delight I have for the books of my life.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Potted Video History of New Yorker Grim Reaper Cartoons; Eckstein: Snowmen As Modern Art; Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s Drawings

 

 

 

 

From newyorker.com, The New Yorker Cartoon History: The Grim Reaper — this fun five minute video takes a look at one of the cartoonists best friends.  See it here.

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From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, “The Snowman As Art” — this piece by the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert, Bob Eckstein.

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The Cartoon Companion is back with ratings for all the cartoons appearing in the latest issue (a double: June 5 & 12) which includes the aforementioned Grim Reaper (on the beach this time around), two subway cartoons, a president playing golf, and a charming drawing from the late Michael Crawford.  

There is also word  that we’ll soon see a new look for the CC (as well as an interview with Harry Bliss and “sketches, rejected cartoons, and other fun stuff”) …can’t wait! For now, here’s the link to the latest post.

Video of Interest: From 1997, ABC’s Nightline Looks at the New Yorker’s Cartoonists; Sam Gross on Jack Ziegler; The Washington Post’s Michael Cavna on Jack Ziegler’s Pivotal Role at The New Yorker

Way way back in December 1997, ABC’s Nightline broadcast “Drawing Laughter: the Cartoonists of The New Yorker” devoting its entire half-hour time slot to New Yorker cartoons and especially, its cartoonists.  The video from ABC’s vault takes us back to the Tina Brown era, the beginning of Bob Mankoff‘s tenure as cartoon editor (he’d only been at the big desk since August), and the  New Yorker’s first Cartoon Issue. The piece includes footage of the Arnold Newman photo-shoot for the fold-out group photo that appeared in that special issue (and in the Nightline piece), a photo-op at the Algonquin,  as well as short profiles of William Hamilton, Roz Chast and Michael Crawford.  Ted Koppel sitting in a cartoon newsroom is priceless. Among those seen in the piece, if far too briefly, are Mischa Richter, Lee Lorenz, Stuart Leeds, Leo Cullum, Al Ross, Bud Handelsman, Edward Koren, Liza Donnelly, Edward Sorel, Robert Weber, Warren Miller, Charles Barsotti, Frank Cotham, Peter Steiner, Frank Modell, Mick Stevens, Danny Shanahan, Mort Gerberg, Bruce Eric Kaplan, and Sam Gross. Bonus: a quick shot of Jack Ziegler (“It’s kinda quiet in here.”).

For more Ziegler on tape, here’s a link to his appearance with David Letterman, June 20, 1983.

 

 

 

 

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Ink Spill received the following from the great Sam Gross (left) about Jack Ziegler:

   

Jack took a fierce pride in his drawings. On one occasion the art director at Look magazine made the mistake of putting a pushpin in one of them and then mounting it on his cork wall. Every art director in those days had a cork wall. Jack went ballistic and wanted to kill him. I calmed him down by convincing him that the art director would burn in hell for what he did. I’m sure Jack has gone to the place where there are no art directors.

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From The Washington Post‘s Comic Riffs columnist, Michael Cavna: “How Jack Ziegler Became ‘The Godfather’ of The New Yorker’s Modern Wave of Cartoonists”

— Mr. Cavna on how Jack Ziegler midwifed the New Yorker‘s cartoons into its second Golden Age.

So Long, 2016. Howdy, 2017

HNYGeez, what a year.  I’ve spent this morning looking back through Ink Spill’s  2016 posts. This was the year we lost more New Yorker cartoonist colleagues  than in any previous twelve month period in the magazine’s history:   William Hamilton, John Caldwell, Gerald Dumas, Michael Crawford, Anatol Kovarsky, Frank Modell, Robert Weber, and Peter Porges.

Their combined published work in The New Yorker adds up to approximately 5,000 drawings. An astounding number.  But of course what they really contributed to the magazine, and to us, whatever number of drawings published, were their distinct worlds, beautifully, thoughtfully, artfully  and engagingly set down on paper.

All of these artists helped define what a New Yorker cartoon is, and what it could be.  As as the old year takes a hike, and a sparkling new year begins, I suggest a fitting tribute to these fine fellows would be to seek out their work and revel in it.

 

 

 

Note: So Long, 2016. Howdy, 2017 is pinched from a line in Bob Dylan’s song, “Talkin’ New York”:  “So long, New York. Howdy, East Orange”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newest Addition to Ink Spill’s Library: Comically Correct

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Courtesy of Danny Shanahan, this promotional booklet (offered with new New Yorker subscriptions?) from 1995 has been added to Ink Spill‘s Library. Of the many promo booklets produced by The New Yorker I’d never seen this one until today. Shown are the cover, the introductory page and the list of cartoonists whose work is within (yes, Bruce Eric Kaplan’s middle name is spelled wrong).

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Exhibit of Interest: R. Crumb’s Early Work; More Spills with Liza Donnelly, Victoria Roberts, Michael Crawford, and a Piece on newyorker.com’s Videos

zap_1-210x300The Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery will exhibit “R. Crumb: Early Works, 1965 – 1967″ Details here.

Mr. Crumb’s New Yorker debut was a cover for the 1994 anniversary issue.  His cover, titled “Elvis Tilley” marked the first break in the magazine’s sixty-eight year old tradition of running Rea Irvin’s classic Eustace Tilley  on the cover of the anniversary issue. (For more on Tilley’s anniversary appearances go here to a piece I wrote for newyorker.com back in 2008)

Elvis Tilley

 

 

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More Spills Icon Editedhere’s a short video for the blog,  Skillshare featuring Liza Donnelly. A link to a longer interview with her can be found on the site. LD Skillshare

 

 

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Link here to this interview of interest:  “New Yorker Cartoonist Victoria Roberts: Write at Home in San Miguel”

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…Here’s an article from Nieman Lab, “Video is giving The New Yorker a way to reach new readers without turning off existing diehards” (the newyorker.com‘s Cartoon Lounge is briefly mentioned).

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Finally, this short piece from a Hudson Valley (NY) publication, Chronogram, “Parting Shot: Michael Crawford”

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