The Tilley Watch Online; New York Magazine Remembers Robert Grossman

Subjects on the Daily Cartoon this past week: Trump, Facebook, New York Governor’s race, Trump, Trump — all courtesy of Jason Chatfield, Brendan Loper, Jeremy Nguyen, Peter Kuper, and Pia Guerra.

And on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Olivia de Recat, Liana Finck, and Maggie Larson.

You can see all of the above, and more, here.

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New York Magazine Remembers Robert Grossman

Mr. Grossman, who died last week, is celebrated by another NYC/Metro area publication of note.  Read it here.

The Tilley Watch Online; Photos from the Kovarsky Opening; “Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

Among the magazine’s Daily cartoons this week:  Kim Warp’s weary winter weather drawing; Brendan Loper’s tweeter-in-chief cartoon;  Lars Kenseth’s  take on this week’s  unusual White House media moment, and Peter Kuper’s Trumpian map of the world.   

Over on Daily Shouts, these were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen and Liana Finck

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Photos From the Kovarsky Opening at The Society of Illustrators

A packed house last night at the Society of Illustrators Opening Reception for Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker. Here’s an array of photos (all by Liza Donnelly, with one exception: the photo of Liza Donnelly and her husband– that’s courtesy of Gina Kovarsky)

Above: a wall of Kovarskys.

Below: Anatol Kovarsky’s daughter, Gina, and Mr. Kovarsky’s wife, Lucille Patton; Ellen Lind and John Lind.  Gina Kovarsky and John Lind co-curated the exhibit.

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Sam Gross and Felipe Galindo

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Liza Donnelly and Michael Maslin

Below: Sam Gross and New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein

Below: Writer/illustrator Mo Willems, Columbia University’s Curator for Comics and Cartoons, Karen Green, and John Lind

 

A closing thought on the exhibit, which runs til March 3 of this year:

This is a terrific show.  The energy bouncing off Mr. Kovarsky’s work on the walls is inspiring.   After looking at all of the covers and drawings I went back and spent more time looking at Mr. Kovarsky’s very first cartoon for the New Yorker.  It was published in the issue of March 1, 1947; here’s how it appeared:

I’ve always had a special affection for first New Yorker drawings.  It is, as they say, a moment.  Every cartoonist remembers the details surrounding their first published drawing. The unspoken mini-drama surrounding the first is that no one knows, of course, whether there’ll be a second (see the Spill‘s One Clubbers on the A-Z).  In Mr. Kovarsky’s case there was a second, and then there were hundreds more — close to 300 in fact. If that wasn’t something impressive in itself, he also contributed 40 covers.  And all this work was done in the relatively short time span of twenty-two years (according to Gina Kovarsky: “In the 1970s, Kovarsky shifted his main focus from cartooning to fine art…”).  It will not come as a surprise to anyone seeing this exhibit how Kovarsky accomplished so much in a mere two decades. It is as if he never set his pen or his brush down for a moment. Kovarsky’s world seemed to be abuzz 24/7. How lucky for us all.   

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“Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

From Westchester Magazine, January 12, 2018, “You Can Meet New Yorker Cartoonists…”

 Here’s a capsule description from the article:

“Not OK” — Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough is a collection of works by previous New Yorker-published cartoonists that fit exactly that bill. Curated by artist and Brooklynite David Ostow, this series has come to Westchester for a month-long showing following the completion of its original gallery run in Bushwick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch on Tuesday: The New Yorker Issue of January 1, 2018

This new issue of the New Yorker, dated January 1, 2018, brings the magazine ever closer to its 93rd birthday in February. The year kicks off (for the magazine) reassuringly with a George Booth cover. Here’s the magazine’s Cover Story with Mr. Booth.  Maybe it’s just me, but I can’t help but think the art contains just a bit of political satire. Could be wrong, could be wrong. 

How I wish I could report that the magazine’s first issue of the new year brought the return of Rea Irvin’s classic masthead for the Talk of The Town, but alas…it’s still a-missin’.  As a reminder, it looks exactly like this:

And now in to the magazine’s cartoons (some of them anyway). As with several weeks ago, I’m not going to go through every drawing in the issue, but just mention a few.

I note that there are 15 cartoonists represented, with one I believe  (please correct me if I’m wrong) making their debut in the magazine: Julia Bernhard. For those counting, that makes 12 new cartoonists thus far in the 8 months of Emma Allen’s watch as cartoon editor.

*A funny cowboy drawing on page 22 caught my eye — Lars Kenseth gives us brothers on the range with one just back from a Christmas visit to their mother.

Things I find amusing about this drawing:

1.The horses obviously know their way around the range — neither harness is equipped with reins. 

2.The Paul Newmanesque Butch Cassidy/Don Corleone/Michael Corleone hats the brothers are wearing.

3. The Christmas sweater worn by the brother who has just returned to work.  I wonder if their mom sent a sweater back for the other brother. 

*For a cartoon situation regularly visited by a lot of cartoonists, Frank Cotham‘s St. Peter’s Gate drawing on page 36 has a few unusual elements.  I’ve never seen St. Peter’s gate depicted like this. It looks like the gate you see on the entrance to a construction site after hours (it’s padlocked). Also, St. Peter’s book is resting on what appears to be a tv tray. 

*David Sipress‘s gladiator drawing on page 40 is a good piece of work.

*Maggie Larson‘s second aerial view drawing.  The last one reminded me a little of an Otto Soglow drawing.  This one immediately made me think of the photographer, Andre Kertesz (here is one of his many photos taken looking down on snowy ground) 

— See you next year

 

 

 

 

Good Cheer and Pizza Aplenty at the New Yorker’s Holiday Party

Thanks to New Yorker cartoonist colleague and official Spill photographer, Liza Donnelly, we can  peek into last night’s holiday party at The New Yorker‘s editorial offices at 1 World Trade Center. 

Below: Joe Dator, David Sipress, and Jeremy Nguyen

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell and Brendan Loper

Below: action shot of long time staffer, Bruce Diones alongside a festive beverage cart:

Below: Peter Kuper

Below, dead-center, The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick, with Mort Gerberg all the way to the left in the blue sweater.

Below: Maggie Larson, Amy Hwang, and Liza Donnelly

  Marc Philippe Eskenazi and Joe Dator

Below: Jeremy Nguyen, Amy Hwang, and Ellis Rosen

Below: legendary cartoonist, Sam Gross

Below: The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen

No party would be complete without at least one Polaroid. This one sent in by Jeremy Nguyen.

From left to right: Mr. Nguyen, Amy Hwang, Ellis Rosen, and Liza Donnelly

Note: over on Facebook Joe Dator has posted another bunch of photos taken last night with cartoonists not shown above, including Ben Schwartz, Drew Dernavich, Emily Flake and the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.