Post of Interest: Liza Donnelly Live-Drawing the Women’s March; Interview of Interest: The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen; TCJ Interview: Zach Kanin

From Medium, “Drawing the Women’s March” — Liza Donnelly writes about live-drawing last week’s big march in NYC.  See it here.

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Interview of Interest: The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen

From Brooklyn Magazine, January 22, 2018, “30 Under 30, Class of ’18: The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor, Emma Allen”  — this interview and a video

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The TCJ Interview : Zach Kanin

From TCJ, January 22, 2018, “Checking in with Zach Kanin” — RJ Casey interviews the cartoonist.

The Tilley Watch Online; Photos from the Kovarsky Opening; “Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

Among the magazine’s Daily cartoons this week:  Kim Warp’s weary winter weather drawing; Brendan Loper’s tweeter-in-chief cartoon;  Lars Kenseth’s  take on this week’s  unusual White House media moment, and Peter Kuper’s Trumpian map of the world.   

Over on Daily Shouts, these were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen and Liana Finck

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Photos From the Kovarsky Opening at The Society of Illustrators

A packed house last night at the Society of Illustrators Opening Reception for Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker. Here’s an array of photos (all by Liza Donnelly, with one exception: the photo of Liza Donnelly and her husband– that’s courtesy of Gina Kovarsky)

Above: a wall of Kovarskys.

Below: Anatol Kovarsky’s daughter, Gina, and Mr. Kovarsky’s wife, Lucille Patton; Ellen Lind and John Lind.  Gina Kovarsky and John Lind co-curated the exhibit.

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Sam Gross and Felipe Galindo

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Liza Donnelly and Michael Maslin

Below: Sam Gross and New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein

Below: Writer/illustrator Mo Willems, Columbia University’s Curator for Comics and Cartoons, Karen Green, and John Lind

 

A closing thought on the exhibit, which runs til March 3 of this year:

This is a terrific show.  The energy bouncing off Mr. Kovarsky’s work on the walls is inspiring.   After looking at all of the covers and drawings I went back and spent more time looking at Mr. Kovarsky’s very first cartoon for the New Yorker.  It was published in the issue of March 1, 1947; here’s how it appeared:

I’ve always had a special affection for first New Yorker drawings.  It is, as they say, a moment.  Every cartoonist remembers the details surrounding their first published drawing. The unspoken mini-drama surrounding the first is that no one knows, of course, whether there’ll be a second (see the Spill‘s One Clubbers on the A-Z).  In Mr. Kovarsky’s case there was a second, and then there were hundreds more — close to 300 in fact. If that wasn’t something impressive in itself, he also contributed 40 covers.  And all this work was done in the relatively short time span of twenty-two years (according to Gina Kovarsky: “In the 1970s, Kovarsky shifted his main focus from cartooning to fine art…”).  It will not come as a surprise to anyone seeing this exhibit how Kovarsky accomplished so much in a mere two decades. It is as if he never set his pen or his brush down for a moment. Kovarsky’s world seemed to be abuzz 24/7. How lucky for us all.   

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“Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

From Westchester Magazine, January 12, 2018, “You Can Meet New Yorker Cartoonists…”

 Here’s a capsule description from the article:

“Not OK” — Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough is a collection of works by previous New Yorker-published cartoonists that fit exactly that bill. Curated by artist and Brooklynite David Ostow, this series has come to Westchester for a month-long showing following the completion of its original gallery run in Bushwick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking Tour of Interest: Library of Congress’s “Drawn To Purpose”; Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler; Kovarsky Opening Reception at the Society of Illustrators, Friday, Jan. 12!

From Comics DC, January 9, 2018, “Touring the LoC’s Drawn  to Purpose exhibit with curator Martha Kennedy” — an interesting walk through with Mike Rhode. Among the New Yorker contributors mentioned: Barbara Shermund, Roberta MacDonald, Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Helen Hokinson, and Alice Harvey. Read it here.

Link to the Library of Congress’s page here.

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Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler

From Bleeding Cool. January 9, 2018, “Shannon Wheeler’s Exhibition of Trump Cartoons, Across From Mar-A-Lago

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A Reminder: The Opening Reception for the Society of Illustrator’s exhibit “Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker” is this Friday, January 12thDetails here.  

More Unseen Kovarsky: Mike Lynch has posted a number of previously unpublished work by Mr. Kovarsky.  See it here!

 

 

Slide Show of Interest: Liza Donnelly’s Live Drawings for CBS News; Blog of Interest: Peter Steiner’s “Hopeless But Not Serious”; Thurber’s “Many Moons” — the Chinese Edition

Slide Show of Interest: Liza Donnelly’s Live Drawings for CBS News

 CBS News has posted a slide show sampler of Liza Donnelly’s work from 2017 (she’s their resident cartoonist).  See it here

Below: the CBS News Control Room

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Blog of Interest: Peter Steiner’s “Hopeless But Not Serious”

Peter Steiner, the artist and writer who brought us one of the most popular New Yorker cartoons in modern times, regularly posts new work on his site. Link here to see it all!  

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Thurber’s Many Moons, the Chinese Edition

While browsing the web looking for the new and/or the unusual in the New Yorker cartoon universe I came upon the Chinese edition of James Thurber’s Many Moons.

Originally published in 1943 by Harcourt, Brace and Company, with the cover illustration and inside illustrations by Louis Slobodkin, the Chinese edition sports new cover art.

Below, left: the original cover.  On the right, the Chinese edition.

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

On this always somewhat hard-to-define week between Christmas Day and New Years Day, these are the New Yorker cartoonists who figured into either the Daily cartoon or Daily Shouts:

*A Daily cartoon by Mort Gerberg:  a skier sees a warning sign(post).

*Another installment of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper” series on Daily Shouts.

*An animated Daily cartoon by Sharon Levy .

*Lars Kenseth’s illustrations for Rejected Versions of “The Gift of the Maji”  — a  Zack Wortman Daily Shouts piece.

All of these can be seen on newyorker.com, either here (Daily Cartoon) or here (Daily Shouts)

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 30: Helen Hokinson for Flit

  Ms. Hokinson, one of the New Yorker‘s earliest stars (Peter Arno was the other) makes her second solo appearance in this series of ads with these two drawings for Flit, both from 1935.  My thanks again to SPX’s Warren Bernard for sharing these ads with us.

Helen Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

*For more reading on Ms. Hokinson there’s no better place to go but Liza Donnelly’s  Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Foreword by Jules Feiffer.  Preface by Lee Lorenz.

 

 

 

The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975 – 1985

With the publication of The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985, the word “Cartoon” makes its second appearance on an Album cover and in an Album  title (the first was on the cover of The Album of Sports and Games: Cartoons of Three Decades).  The magazine’s 60th anniversary not only saw this anthology published, but the magazine’s fans were treated to a fabulous show of cartoons and covers, curated by Barbara Nicholls, a former art assistant to James Geraghty (Ms. Nicholls went on to establish a gallery representing many of the New Yorker’s artists). 

Mounted at the New York Public Library, this was the show for anyone who loved the magazine’s art.  Following its run in New York, the exhibit went on the road across the country, and across the big pond. Here’s the brochure:

But now back to the anthology. You can see by the cover that the design is solidly in the school of the understated. The is no introduction within, no foreword, no dedication. Compare the cover to the cover of the 90th Anniversary Book of Cartoons (the Spill will eventually get to that on another Sunday) — you’ll see how graphic decision-making has changed.

The 1975- 1985 Album leads off with a spectacular full page drawing by Robert Weber, and it ends with a full page Charles Addams drawing.  In between you’ll find a rich array of the grand masters of the form: Steig, Steinberg, George Price, Dana Fradon, Warren Miller, Frank Modell,  the aforementioned  Weber and Addams, Henry Martin, Booth, Koren, Ed Arno ( but not Peter Arno, who had passed away in 1968), Whitney Darrow, Jr., James Stevenson, Ed Fisher…the list couldn’t go on and on — it was, after all, finite, but you get the idea.  Also in the Album, a new wave of cartoonists, including Mick Stevens, Leo Cullum, Liza Donnelly, the two Roz’s: Zanengo and Chast, Tom Cheney, Michael Crawford, Richard Cline, Bill Woodman, Peter Steiner, and Mike Twohy, among others (including yours truly). Jack Ziegler, who I’ve dubbed “The Godfather of Contemporary New Yorker Cartoonists”  was a late entry in the 1925-1975 Album (his first New Yorker cartoon was published in 1974. He’s represented in the 1925-1975 Album by one cartoon)Here, in the 1975-1985 Album his genius is on full display.  

This Album would be the last published during William Shawn’s editorship.  The next Album would not appear until the year 2000, the magazine’s 75th anniversary (in between was Lee Lorenz’s Art of The New Yorker: 1925- 1995). 

Below: the back cover of the The New Yorker Cartoon Album 1975-1985:

And the inside flap copy: