The Nib Looks at New Yorker Cartoons in 2040; Of Interest: Cartoon Companion’s Frank Cotham Interview, Part 2

The Nib Looks at New Yorker cartoons  in 2040

 

 

 

Here’s an amusing piece from The Nib, August 8, 2017,  “New Yorker 2040” — too bad the author didn’t try imagining various cartoonists styles 23 years from now instead of just using one vaguely  1950s – early 1960s similar style…or is that what’s in store?  Bonus: the zillionth take-off on Steinberg’s iconic New Yorker cover. ________________________________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion’s Frank Cotham Interview, Part 2

Cartoon Companion has posted the second half of its interview with veteran New Yorker cartoonist, Frank Cotham (shown to the left wearing the pointed party hat; this is a cropped screen grab from the Arnold Newman group photo that appeared in the very first Cartoon Issue of The New Yorker, Dec. 15, 1997). To the left of him is Dean Vietor, to the right of Mr. Cotham is Mick Stevens in his customary top hat. That’s Lee Lorenz, lower left, joyously tossing confetti in the air, and Mike Twohy, lower right, tentatively tossing confetti).

Read Part 2 of the CC’s Cotham interview here.

Fave Photo of the Day: Dator & Le Lievre Down Under; Attempted Bloggery on Advertising Work By New Yorker Cartoonists; A Spill Note

Fave Photo of the Day

Here’s Joe Dator, in the land down under with New Yorker cartoonist colleague, Glen Le Lievre, August 2017.

Mr. Dator began contributing toThe New Yorker in 2006.

Mr. Le Lievre began contributing toThe New Yorker in 2004.

 

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Attempted Bloggery On Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists

I’d planned to briefly detour from the Warren Bernard New Yorker cartoonists ad collection that’s been appearing here and show the Absolut ads — all appeared in 1991 —  by a bunch of colleagues (Robert Weber, William Hamilton, Edward Koren, Victoria Roberts, Roz Chast, Jack Ziegler, Mischa Richter, Danny Shanahan, and Lee Lorenz).  I soon discovered that Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery had already done just that in a January 2016 post.  It includes scans of all the ads.  See them here. __________________________________________

A Spill Note

Normally, today’s Spill would consist entirely of The Monday Tilley Watch, but alas, the New Yorker that appeared last week (dated August 7 & 14, 2017) is a double issue, so no new cartoons until next Monday.

 

 

 

 

Fairfield County (CT) Cartoonists; E.B. and Katharine White’s Home for Sale; Lots of Peter Arno on Pinterest; William Steig’s Connecticut Home For Sale

Fairfield County Connecticut’s Cartoonists

Here’s a really nice article in Vanity Fair, “When Fairfield County Was the Comic-Strip Capital of The World” written by Cullen Murphy, whose father drew “Prince Valiant” — a number of New Yorker artists show up (as you might expect as the county also had a large concentration of  cartoonists from the magazine…see this link for more on that).

 

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E.B. and Katharine White’s Home For Sale

From Town & Country, this article  — with photos — on the home previously owned by E.B. and Katharine White, now up for sale.

Why is this on Ink Spill, you might ask?  The White’s were major figures in the development of the New Yorker; both intersected with the magazine’s cartoons. One of Mr. White’s many duties at the New Yorker  was tinkering with cartoon captions. The most famous tinkering resulted in the Carl Rose drawing that appeared in the December 8, 1928 New Yorker:spinach

“It’s broccoli, dear.”

“I say it’s spinach, and I say the hell with it.” 

To read a little more about that particular caption, go here.

In the earliest decades of the New Yorker, Katharine White headed the fiction department. The cartoons fell under the fiction department’s umbrella until James Geraghty was appointed in 1939, when a stand alone art department was created.  In his book, The Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995,  the magazine’s former Art Editor, Lee Lorenz wrote of Ms. White: “She remained a powerful voice in the selection of the magazine’s art even after she and her second husband, E. B. White, moved to Maine in the mid-thirties.”

Two recommended biographies: Scott Elledge’s E.B. White: A Biography (Norton, 1984)

and Linda Davis’s Onward and Upward: A Biography of Katharine S. White (Harper & Row, 1987)

And for a wonderful read on that era of the New Yorker: Thomas Vinciguerra’s Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber, And the Golden Age of The New Yorker (W.W. Norton & Co.,  2016)

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A lot of Peter Arno on Pinterest

Billed as “182 Best Peter Arno Images on Pinterest” — it doesn’t disappoint. The post even includes the dummy cover for my Arno biography.

Anyway, it’s fun to see so much Arno in one place. New Yorker cartoons, New Yorker covers, advertisements — all kinds of wonderful art by the master.

 

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William Steig’s Kent Connecticut Home For Sale

Fear not — Ink Spill is not pushing real estate.  It’s just coincidence (or as Curly of the Three Stooges would say, “a coinkydink”) that two homes by three major New Yorker figures are up for sale. This is William Steig’s home in Kent, Connecticut. Read all about the home here.

Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

William Steig Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Booth: Model; Michael Crawford’s Maps; Roz Chast’s National Book Festival Poster

George Booth: Model

The cartoonist , Mike Lynch has recently turned up an issue of Leatherneck (October, 1951) with George Booth on the cover.  Sarah Booth has confirmed that is indeed her father having his helmet painted, telling the Spill, “I’d know that  look of mischief anywhere!”

According to Lee Lorenz’s  The Essential George Booth (Workman, 1998), Mr. Booth, who had enlisted as a Marine in 1944, re-inlisted and joined the Leatherneck staff in 1946, contributing  cartoons,  spots, spreads, and covers.  In a 1998, he told The New Yorker’s David Owen (for a Booth Profile) that Leatherneck was “a global magazine, and a very good one. It was slick. It gave me my start, and I got to work with some top professionals. It was really better than any school I could have gone to, and I learned a lot.” 

Above: Booth on the cover, and below, a Booth cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Michael Crawford’s Maps

From newyorker.com’s Culture Desk, July 4, 2017,  “Michael Crawford’s Mixed-Up U.S.A.”

Matt Dellinger, the late Mr. Crawford’s friend, introduces us to a slide show of unusual maps.

 

 

 

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Roz Chast’s National Book Festival Poster

From finebooksmagazine.com, July 6, 2017, “Cartoonist Roz Chast Designs National Book Festival Poster”

Ms. Chast, in a press release:

“I wanted to make a poster that expressed the excitement, appreciation, and delight I have for the books of my life.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day; An Obscure Hoff

Of many wonderful photos from Jack Ziegler‘s memorial this past Saturday,  this one really caught my eye. Taken by the New Yorker‘s former television critic, Nancy Franklin, we see, from the left, the New Yorker‘s newly appointed cartoon editor, Emma Allen, then Anne Hall Elser, and Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s art editor from 1973 through 1993, and then cartoon editor from 1993 through 1997. We have Mr. Lorenz to thank for bringing Mr. Ziegler’s work into the magazine.  Ms. Elser was Mr. Lorenz’s invaluable assistant in the art department for his 24 years in that position.

At some point during Saturday’s event,  Danny Shanahan introduced Ms. Allen to Mr. Lorenz.  I’m hoping a photo will surface.

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An Obscure Hoff

Scott Burns, of Armadillo & Dicker Books out in California has sent in this scan of a hitherto (for me) unseen Syd Hoff piece. Here’s Mr. Burns’ description:

The Jigger. Fall, 1951, Vol 3. No. 4. Philadelphia: The Drake Press. 3”x6” stapled wrappers, 24 pp. Appears to be a trade magazine for distribution to bartenders and others in the liquor industry. Recipes, thirteen cartoons plus cover by Syd Hoff, TV announcements, party hints.
 
 
Note:  The Spill posts pieces such as this purely for historical reasons, i.e., there is no commercial attachment to this bookseller or any other.

Firsts: Jack Ziegler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning today, Ink Spill will every so often, and without warning, run the first New Yorker cartoon by one of its artists.  Accompanying the drawing will be that issues Table of Contents, so we have an idea of the lay of the magazine’s cartoon land at that time.  Starting things off is the first New Yorker cartoon by the late and exceptionally great Jack Ziegler, published in the issue of February 11, 1974. This is an evergreen drawing; it could run any week, any year and still work as well as it did back in 1974. When I interviewed Mr. Ziegler last Fall (here are links to part one and two) he said: “It’s always nice when cartoonists know how to draw so that they can give us something pleasant and fun to look at.”

Below:  the Table of Contents from that issue. The New Yorker‘s editor then was William Shawn, and the art editor was Lee Lorenz.