Most Popular Instagrammed New Yorker Cartoons; Site of Continued Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind; A Reminder: Tomorrow is Nancy Night at The Society of Illustrators

The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen presents Instagram’s most liked New Yorker cartoons of 2017 (by # of Instagram likes, of course). The list includes cartoons by (in no particular order here) : Farley Katz, Peter Kuper, Liana Finck, Paul Noth, Jeremy Nguyen, Roz Chast, Ben Schwartz, Kim Warp, Mort Gerberg, Emily Flake, Charlie Hankin, Alex Gregory, Maddie Dai, and Lars Kenseth. I believe these cartoons are a mix of work that appeared in the print version of the magazine or in the online only Daily cartoon slot.  See them here!  

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Site of Continued Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

Yet another fun & fascinating installment from this site. Read here.

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A Reminder:  Karasik’s & Newgarden’s Nancy Night Tomorrow at the Society of Illustrators

All the info here

The Tilley Watch Online; Lost then Found

The Tilley Watch Online

Two Blopers this week on the Daily.  It’s actually Brendan Loper — he signs  his work “Bloper” which to this cartoonist’s eyes and ears involuntarily suggests “blooper” (sorry, Mr. Loper)… Nice elephant in the brush drawing by Mr. Loper.  Other drawings feature Putin (by Loper), the Clintons and our president (by Lars Kenseth) and the Panamanian files (by Maddie Dai), and a marathoner, courtesy of Farley Katz (with enjoyable forest animals by Mr. Katz). And over on Daily Shouts, an advice column (to appear every other week) makes its debut.  Liana Finck answers tough questions about “how to act in difficult situations”…

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Lost Then Found

Back in February of 2008 I was asked to be what was jokingly called a “cartoon captain” for a month.  That meant contributing pieces to newyorker.com on a daily basis (in my case, I alternated between a graphic series called Cartoonography  and written pieces).  These pieces were all archived on the magazine’s site.  That is, until a few months ago, when all of the written pieces suddenly (and mysteriously) disappeared (the Cartoonography pieces were not disappeared).

Following the disappearance, I decided to post all the written pieces here on the Spill, but found I could not find a single copy of any of them here at home (either hard copies or digital files). All seemed lost. The online folks at the New Yorker also (initially) came up empty-handed (or empty-filed). Then just last week, all of the pieces suddenly reappeared online. I want to thank Michael Agger at newyorker.com for his diligence. The pieces on newyorker.com are exactly as first published.  For the Spill, I updated the piece titled “Glossary” to reflect the new cartoon editor era.

I’ve collected the pieces on the Posted Notes section of the Spill (just scroll down past all of the Rea Irvin Talk mastheads)…so they can be read as a whole.  And you can now also find them once again here on newyorker.com among other pieces I’ve contributed (Cartoonography is there still, and it can be found on the Bio section of the Spill).  Whew.

 

 

George Booth on CBS Sunday Morning; John Held’s 1927 Cover; More Spills: Lars Kenseth, Tom Toro

The one-and-only George Booth, whose life work, as regular visitors to the Spill know, is currently being celebrated at The Society of Illustrators, will be featured in a CBS “Sunday Morning” segment this weekend.  Info here.

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Attempted Bloggery continues to find fun stuff.  Today it’s a John Held, Jr cover for a 1927 Yale- Princeton Football game.

Below is a snippet.  To see it all, go here.

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Lars Kenseth has joined Darlycagle.com.

Tom Toro has announced that his work is now available on Artsugar.

Jack Ziegler New Yorker Covers: Hits & Misses; The Tilley Watch Online

Jack Ziegler’s daughter, Jessica has posted five covers submitted to, but alas, rejected by The New Yorker  over the course of Mr. Ziegler’s long career (one of them appears above).  To see the others and to sign up for the Ziegler newsletter go here.

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It’s been a interesting week on newyorker.com.  Some highlights:  Emily Flake weighing in on the President via Daily Shouts; in the Daily cartoon slot:  Peter Kuper’s politically tinged postcards, God on a shrink’s couch courtesy of Kim Warp, Lars Kenseth’s hammer-wielding President, a David Sipress military man with an interesting medal, and some unusual activity in the Oval Office from Brendan Loper. 

 

 

Podcast of Interest: Liza Donnelly with Susan Orlean & Sarah Thyre; Update: MAD Panelists at “Satire and the City” Cartoon Festival; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; New Animated Addams Family Planned; The Tilley Watch Online

Podcast of Interest: Liza Donnelly with Susan Orlean and Sarah Thyre

Liza Donnelly visits writer, Susan Orlean and actress, Sarah ThyreHear it here.

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Update: MAD Panelists at “Satire and the City” Cartoon Festival

As promised in yesterday’s post about the upcoming Association of American Editorial Cartoonists “Satire and the City” Cartoon Festival, here are the MAD magazine panelists scheduled to appear:

John Ficarra, Senior VP & Executive Editor, a MAD staffer since 1980, co-editor (with Nick Meglin) 1985-2004, editor-in-chief 2004-present

Joe Raiola and Charlie Kadau, Senior Editors, MAD staffers since 1985

Al Jaffee, MAD contributor since 1955, creator of the Fold-In and Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions, Guiness World Record holder, “Longest Career as a Comic Artist”

Moderator, Sam Viviano, VP—Art & Design, MAD contributor since 1981, art director 1999-present.

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

 Cartoon Companion’s Max and Simon had their work cut for them this week with nearly two dozen cartoons to inspect and examine. Among the dissected: a literary plumbing problem, Tinder behavior, Nambia located, and a Frankensteinian moment.   Read it all here.

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New Animated Addams Family Planned

According to this report the creepy and kooky and altogether ooky “Addams Family” will return to delight us.

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The Tilley Watch Online
I was at a table of New Yorker cartoonists some months back when the conversation turned to the future of the print magazine.  Someone asked me what I thought and I (jokingly) said, “Two years left at most”  — it was a rock in a pond moment; my table mates eyes grew wide, their bodies shifted anxiously.  I don’t really think print is close to dead, and I don’t really believe the print version of The New Yorker will cease in two years, but I do believe that online is where the action increasingly is.  With that said, it only makes sense that the Spill pays closer attention to the New Yorker‘s online non-print features that involve — or sometimes involve — its cartoonists: The Cartoon Lounge, The Daily Cartoon, Daily Shouts and other features (video, podcasts, etc.).  Not all of these features will be noted daily.  Fickleness rules here.
 
And so off we go …
 
Video segments of last weekend’s New Yorker Festival have been posted on newyorker.com.  Of interest: the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen spoke with Kumail Nanjiani
 
And here’s a clip of Andy Borowitz doing some stand-up (Mr. Borowitz isn’t a cartoonist, but his work seems, at times, ever-so-close to captionville — that’s a compliment).  
 
Daily Shouts: Recent posts include Farley Katz on pumpkins and Lars Kenseth on Roomba Error Codes. See the pieces here
 
Daily Cartoon: Recent posts include the aforementioned Mr. Kenseth, Mick Stevens and Peter Kuper.  See a slide show of over a dozen recent Daily Cartoons here.
 
 
 
 
 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker, October 9, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

The New Yorker has gone through a number of survivable events in its 92 year history. It nearly folded in its first six months of existence, but survived when Raoul Fleischmann, its original backer, suddenly turned white knight, decided to pump more money into it. The magazine survived when the magazine’s founder and first editor Harold Ross died too soon.  The magazine survived its transition from the Fleischmann family to the Newhouse family in the late 1980s, and all the hooplah that ensued when William Shawn was succeeded by Robert Gottlieb, and when Gottlieb was in turn succeeded by Tina Brown, who was then succeeded by its current editor, David Remnick.  It won’t go without saying that yesterday’s news of the passing of Si Newhouse, owner of The New Yorker caused a lot of ink to begin flowing (online as well as print) about what his passing means for the future of the magazine.  Perhaps it’s best to acknowledge that the crystal ball is cloudiest just when we want it to be crystal clear. 

And now on to the cartoons in the latest issue.  

Two BEK covers in the last six issues of The New Yorker. Amazing. I’m always thrilled to see a cartoonist colleague’s work on the cover, and am ever hopeful more and more will be added into the mix.

Following all the up front of the book graphics (ads, of course, and illustrations) we come to the calm spread of pages 28 & 29 with a well placed Liana Finck drawing on the upper right.  I like the use of the word “monsters” in the caption.  I think the word has also suggested (at least to me) that the fellow Ms. Finck has pictured resembles ever-so-slightly the Frankenstein monster (as played by Boris Karloff).  

Six pages later we come to a Jon Adams drawing (his first New Yorker cartoon appeared last week).  The desert island cartoon, once seemingly on the verge of retirement is as present as ever in the magazine.  I’ll be curious as to how the Cartoon Companion guys dissect this drawing (we’ll find out later in the week when they post). I’m reluctant to step on their turf, but can’t help but be concerned that the angle of the palm tree which is about to catapult one of the islanders into the ocean (presumably to safety) will throw the fellow away from the container ship off in the distance. This is part of what cartoonists do, I guess.  We worry about the fate of stranded cartoon characters on a cartoon desert island.

On the very next page is a Michelangelo moment courtesy of Julia Suits.  Her drawing is based on one of the master’s greatest hits within one of his greatest hits:  the “Creation of Adam” (seen below) on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Ms. Suits has given us the origin story of a slightly shocking moment we’ve all experienced at one time or another. 

A couple of pages past the beginning of a Janet Malcolm piece on Rachel Maddow we come to a two-fer spread: an Edward Koren drawing on the left side and a Matthew Diffee on the right. Mr. Koren is our longest serving cartoon contributor, having first been published in 1962. It’s always a good week when one of his drawings graces the pages of the magazine. Selfishly, I would’ve loved to see this drawing run at least half-a-page.  But as the Rolling Stones so memorably sang, “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometime you find you get what you need.” 

A quartet of pages later we come to a drawing by newbie, Maddie Dai; the drawing itself carries a candidate for longest caption in a New Yorker cartoon.  I think of George Booth when I see a lot of caption. Here’s an example of a long-form  Boothian caption from The New Yorker, February 18th,  1985:

Strangely enough, on the page following Ms. Dai’s fortune teller drawing is another longish captioned drawing — this one by David Sipress. I like the whiskerless cat(?) on the floor of this drawing.  It looks a bit distressed. Four pages later a Roz Chast triptych incorporating the word “illuminati”;  I’m beginning to get the feeling this issue is thematic in a mystical, monstrous, space agey way (Ms. Finck’s monster, Ms. Suits Michelangelo drawing, Maddie Dai’s fortune teller, Mr. Sipress’s a newly discovered planet drawing, and now Ms. Chast’s illuminati).  Probably just coincidence. 

Two pages later, the theme goes up in smoke as P.C. Vey takes us shopping. I note that none of the products on the shelves carry labeling. I’m reminded of the books in Chairman Mao’s library. On closer inspection, there is writing present on Mao’s books, but the first impression is similar (for me anyway) to Mr. Vey’s supermarket shelving.   

On the very next page after Mr. Vey’s shopping expedition we’re thematically back to religion with an Adam and Eve drawing courtesy of Will McPhail.  I suppose it’s possible it’s not Adam and Eve as the female here has to my eyes a contemporary haircut. You can’t see much of Adam, as he’s behind a giant leaf that doesn’t quite cover the “all”  mentioned in his caption. Someone who knows leaves can set me straight if Mr. McPhail’s leaf is similar to this maple leaf I grabbed off of Google images.  

 

A couple pages later another relative newbie, Kate Curtis (her first drawing appeared in the New Yorker in January of 2016).  Back to contemporary life with an airline check-in moment. The drawing looks vaguely Kim Warpian (it’s the airline employee’s fingers I think that bring Ms. Warp’s work to mind). Seven pages later we’re whip-lashed back to King Arthur’s big sword in the stone moment with a contemporary twist, courtesy of Ben Schwartz. Lars Kenseth had a sword and stone drawing recently. I wonder if sword and stone drawings are going to give desert island drawings a run for their money.

Nine pages later, we remain (somewhat) in ancient times with a couple of medieval towers (sans Rapunzel…possibly), and a dragon…and a lawn mower?  All from Avi Steinberg’s pen. This drawing reminds me of the George Price classic below (published in The New Yorker June 3, 1939).  Both Mr. Steinberg’s and Mr. Price’s have guys outdoors doing something in the yard; both have woman in the window calling out to the guys; both have something wrapped around a structure: Mr. Steinberg has a dragon, Mr. Price has ivy.

On the following page a talking clock from Eric Lewis. I’m always reluctant to favor a drawing in the Monday Tilley Watch (again, that’s what they do over on the Cartoon Companion site), but I’m going to favor this, the last drawing in the issue. I see shades of various artists in the drawing itself — this isn’t unusual: I see some vague hint of various cartoonists’ work in every cartoonist’s drawing (including my own). In this case it’s a little Stuart Leeds, a little Gahan Wilson, and a shadow of Pierre Le-Tan.  Of course, the drawing itself is pure Eric Lewis — an excellent way to end the issue. 

— see you next week.