Bob Eckstein Named Writer’s Digest Columnist; The Tilley Watch: A Steed Full Page; Emma Allen Plays Ball

 

 

Writer’s Digest has announced that Bob Eckstein, whose latest book (shown to the left) has received great notices, will become their recurring columnist beginning this summer. Read all about it here.

Visit Mr. Eckstein’s website here (where you’ll find links to his New Yorker work, and work elsewhere)

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In the latest episode of The Cartoon Lounge, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen plays ball with Colin Stokes, the associate cartoon editor.  And they also take a look at Ed Steed’s full page (yes, a full page!) drawing appearing in the magazine’s latest issue. Nice glimpse of the Thurber wall drawing around the 2:05 mark.

also of note: Kim Warp is now doing the Daily Cartoon.  

Attempted Bloggery Looks at an Addams Cover; Kim Warp on Meeting Jack Ziegler

One of my go-to New Yorker-related sites, Attempted Bloggery, takes a look at a recently auctioned later Charles Addams New Yorker cover. See it here.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Charles Addams Born in Westfield, New Jersey , January 7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker publishes his work posthumously. Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981).

In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Website: http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Kim Warp (left) has sent along this memory of meeting Jack Ziegler, who passed away on March 29th of this year:

I admired Jack Ziegler greatly, of course. I only met him one time, at a New Yorker cartoonist’s lunch. I was too intimidated to go talk to him but he came up and introduced himself and was very nice. I managed to say something like, “You’re really good at perspective” to which he just smiled. He was an inspiration to all of us, expanded the possibilities of the form, and was a master draftsman, which is what I was trying to say.

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New Yorker Cartoons of the Year 2016 Index

new-yorker-best-cartoons-of-the-year-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Ink Spill tradition continues with the posting of an Index for the Cartoons of the Year bookazine.   Why an Index you might ask.  Mostly because I always enjoyed seeing them in the magazine’s hardcover anthologies (the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Albums) and missed having an Index for these yearly bookazines (they started in 2010). I wouldn’t read too too much into the numbers of drawings you see listed for each cartoonist, but the Index itself is a reasonably good snapshot of the New Yorker‘s somewhat boisterous stable of cartoonists in these last few years.

You’ll see that few of the entries have a “(cc)” beside certain page numbers.  The “cc” refers to the Caption Contest.  So those particular drawings appeared on the magazine’s back page.  You might notice that there’s an asterisk next to Julia Wertz’s name.  That’s because her name does not appear on the list of contributing cartoonists found on page 4 of the bookazine. She is, however, included on the Contributors page (p.2).

And here you go:

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Darrin Bell   62

Harry Bliss 5, 12, 15, 45, 53, 57, 60, 77, 115, 142 (cc)

David Borchart 12

Pat Byrnes 32

Roz Chast 7, 55, 75-76, 89, 117, 138

Tom Cheney 9, 48

Tom Chitty 29

Frank Cotham 30, 34

Michael Crawford 78, 96, 133

Joe Dator 46, 120, 134, 139(cc)

Drew Dernavich 60, 90, 117

Matthew Diffee 138

Liza Donnelly  28

J. C. Duffy 59

Bob Eckstein 70, 102

Liana Finck 13, 37-40, 55, 95, 137

Emily Flake 26, 28, 87, 121

Seth Fleishman 79, 80

Alex Gregory 70, 124

Sam Gross 135

William Haefeli 22, 122

Kaamran Hafeez 74, 94, 123

Tim Hamilton 93

Charlie Hankin 6, 25, 36, 56, 88

Amy Hwang 21, 51, 54

Carolita Johnson 136

Zachary Kanin 11, 27, 59, 69, 93, 140(cc)

Bruce Eric Kaplan 14, 25, 67, 91, 123,

Farley Katz 11, 15, 24

Jason Adam Katzenstein 10, 13, 57, 62, 136

John Klossner 91

Edward Koren 8

Ken Krimstein 19, 82

Peter Kuper 17

Amy Kurzweil 122, 124

Robert Leighton 53, 72, 98, 101, 102, 104

Christian Lowe 78

Robert Mankoff 35, 119

Michael Maslin 80, 132

William McPhail 23, 42, 45, 63, 81, 98, 141(cc)

Paul Noth 61, 65, 71, 73, 74, 79, 83, 85, 92, 97, 135

John O’Brien 44

Drew Panckeri  88

Jason Patterson  86, 133

Victoria Roberts  120

Dan Roe  14

Benjamin Schwartz  13, 33, 56, 64, 83, 84, 101, 116

Danny Shanahan  8, 9, 23, 64, 141 (cc)

Michael Shaw  67

David Sipress 10, 24, 33, 52, 58, 66, 71, 116, 119, 134

Barbara Smaller  19, 22, 27, 30, 36, 54, 94, 118

Trevor Spaulding  43, 85

Edward Steed  16, 34, 43, 44, 49, 68, 86, 99, 103, 105-114

Avi Steinberg  96, 99

Mick Stevens  6, 47, 52, 86, 89, 103

Matthew Stiles Davis 18

Mark Thompson  61

Tom Toro 16, 21, 46, 48, 50, 69, 82, 104

P.C. Vey 31, 35, 90, 95, 137, 140(cc)

Liam Walsh 18, 41, 47, 49, 50, 84

Kim Warp 7

Julia Wertz * 125-131

Christopher Weyant  31, 42

Shannon Wheeler  73

Gahan Wilson  20

Jack Ziegler  63, 66, 100

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R. Crumb: “…Born Weird”; Kim Warp Does The Daily Cartoon

CrumbFrom The Guardian, April 24, 2016, this interview, “Robert Crumb: ‘I Was Born Weird'”

 

 

 

 

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Tilley Watch...

 

 

 

 

Daily logo

 

 

 

 

 

The fabulous Kim Warp is now in charge of The New Yorker‘s Daily Cartoon.  See her Daily work here.

 

Ms. Warp’s website.

Her New Yorker work as seen on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

Below, a Warp cartoon from the April 6th 2015 New Yorker

Warp April 2015

Leo Cullum: The Pilot Who Made People Smile; Kim Warp Pencilled

LeoHere’s a nice piece about the late Leo Cullum: “The Pilot Who Made People Smile” from a Bangor Daily News blog.

Link here to Mr. Cullum’s New Yorker work.

 

 

 

 

 

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06b4556Kim Warp is the latest New Yorker cartoonist to talk about tools of the trade on the blog, A Case For PencilsSee it here.

Link here to Ms. Warp’s New Yorker work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

Link here to Ms. Warp’s website.

Happy Birthday, Mr. Arno

Arno

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The late great New Yorker artist, Peter Arno was born 110 years ago today at home in Morningside Heights, New York.  As many regular visitors to Ink Spill know, I began a biography of Mr. Arno back in 1999.   Someday, a publisher willing, Mad At Something: The Life and Times of Peter Arno will be available to all those wishing to know a whole lot more about him.

 

Arno began contributing to The New Yorker in June of 1925 and continued contributing until his death in 1968 (his last cover for the magazine appears above). Over the past fifteen years I’ve asked New Yorker cartoonists to talk to me about Arno.  Today I’ve decided to run a handful of their responses. Some of these cartoonists were contemporaries of Arno’s, and some are in the early phase of their New Yorker cartoonist adventure.

 

 Frank Modell  began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 1946.  I first  interviewed Frank in February of 2000 and then again this past Fall.At 95 he is one of the two New Yorker contributors still with us who actually met Arno (Lillian Ross is the other.  Roger Angell told me he spoke with Arno on the phone, but never actually met him).

Let me tell you something about [Arno] – he was a worrier.  As good as he was, and as strong an artist as he was, surprisingly he was the most worried of all the cartoonists about his drawing.  He would call up [The New Yorker’s Art Department] and say,  ‘Did you get that drawing, the finish I sent in – did you print it yet?’  And I’d say no, then he’d say, ‘Don’t print it!  Tell Geraghty I’m doing another one – I don’t want him to print it until I do another one.’  Then he’d send in another version that didn’t look any different than the first.”

 

 

Syd Hoff, who died in 2004, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1931

“Arno belonged to the great era of Benchley, E.B. White, Perelman, etc., the era of the Great Depression and two emerging classes, upper and lower.  Arno belonged to the upper. Who’ll ever forget his Park Avenue types, on their way to a newsreel theater ‘to hiss Roosevelt’? Those bold drawings!  Nobody could imitate them.  They had to come out of the bourgeoisie!  I remember him standing outside 25 West 43rd Street!  He was big and narrow, just like his men, without [the] handlebar mustaches…”


Robert WeberIf you ask 20 cartoonists to name the top ten cartoonists to come out of the post-Harold Ross years, Robert Weber’s name will surely be on that list.  Mr. Weber’s distinctive bold effortless line is a thing to behold.  Mr. Weber will be 90 this coming April. He began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962.

“I wish I had known or even just met Arno and I regret I didn’t.  I’ve always admired his work, particularly his later work for The New Yorker.  I don’t think I ever consciously tried to emulate him, although I’ve learned a lot from his superb sense of composition and drama.  He had a marvelous ability to simplify.  He never permitted anything extraneous, and he developed a powerful style unlike anyone else.  And, of course, he was funny.  Put me down as a big fan.”

 

Alex Gregory began contributing to The New Yorker in  1999. Besides his work for the magazine he works in television and film. 

 “As far as Arno’s impact on me personally, I grew up looking enviously at his drawings in anthologies.  I would say that Arno is the New Yorker artist that I would most like to have emulated yet had the least capacity to do so.  His cartoons are like black-and-white Matisses. but in some ways even more accomplished. – they capture a person’s mood, character, and breeding with just a few thick supremely confident brush strokes.  The art direction in each panel is flawless; characters are placed perfectly, and the action is always expressive without being broad.   And as rich as each image is, he never gets bogged down in any details that could slow down the joke. His drawings appear to be done by a man who has never known a moment of fear or self-doubt in his life.   I suppose it was Arno more than any other cartoonist save Thurber that made me think of cartooning as an actual art form.”

 


Al Ross, who died in 2012, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1937.

“Arno was special.  He was special like Charles Addams was special, and Price was special.  You know what I mean?”

 

George Booth  began sharing his wonderful world of dogs, cats and characters with The New Yorker’s readership in 1969. 

 “Peter Arno’s work stands out and holds up in the test of time. His drawings and words were never timid, or just clever. They stated high quality, joy, confidence, strength, style, humor, idea, life, simplicity.  His color was right; black and white became color.  His cartoons were researched, with words well applied.  The communication was clear and timely.  He knew what he was doing.  Peter Arno was an artist worthy who gave something of value to the world.  A hero.”

 

 

Eldon Dedini,  who died in 2006, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1950.

“[Arno’s] cartoons were a major inspiration to me.  His staging of a gag was masterful in its simplicity.  No extra crap — the point -bang!  Even today when I have trouble with a drawing I ask myself ‘How would Arno do it?’ and look in collections of his for the answer…Arno is still the model for me and for any thinking cartoonist.”

 

Paul Noth  began contributing to The New Yorker in 2004.  Besides his work for the magazine he has also written for television.

“I was attracted to library books of his when I was a kid because of the sexy ladies (I was raised a strict Catholic, so actual nudity was too much for me, but cartoons like his were somehow okay).

 

Mischa Richter,  who died in 2001, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1950.

“A modern Daumier.”

 

Barbara Smaller began  contributing to The New Yorker in  1996.

  “Arno’s sophisticated bad boy sensibilities never resonated with me in the way a William Steig or George Price’s more plebian ones did.  Still there is much I admire about his drawings, particularly his wonderful deep blacks and dramatic compositions.  I also admit to enjoying the People magazine aspects of his private life;  the high highs and the satisfying low lows.  They are an object lesson to all wayward cartoonists!”

 

Henry Martin began contributing to The New Yorker in 1964

 “… Jim Geraghty bought three ideas from me for Arno in 1964 and 1965.  He was the master, but like so many of the greats the idea wells ran dry, but, lord, how they could create memorable drawings.”

 

Kim Warp began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

Peter Arno wasn’t the reason I became a cartoonist in particular but he was always part of the cartoon collections  that fascinated me as a child…I was impressed by the graphic power of his drawings ( although I wouldn’t have called it that at the time of course) and by the world he portrayed.  In particular I remember the “I’m checking up for the company, Madam.  Have you any of our fuller Brush men.?” Cartoon which somehow melded in my mind with his man in the shower cartoon. This was a much  more interesting world of possibility than  I was being led to believe existed by 1960s TV shows. When I think of him now I’m struck by the grown-up playfulness and joy of life his cartoons portray which contrasts with the work-obsessedness of today.  Maybe it’s just me but I don’t know too many people who have wild cocktail parties after work or fuller brush men hidden in their apartment.  Everyone is at soccer practice with the kids.”

 

 

Edward Sorel began contributing to The New Yorker in 1990.  Mr. Sorel, I believe, is the closest we’ve come to a modern day Arno. 

“It was Arno, not John Held, Jr. who was the true artist of the Jazz Age. Not only was his canvas much larger—including not only the coeds in their yellow slickers, but rich clubmen, gold-diggers, Hollywood illiterates, the unemployed, and most especially, satyrs and other pursuers of sex. And beyond his subject matter, his style of drawing, so spontaneous looking, is much more in keeping with the spirit of the roaring, anything goes, twenties, than Held’s meticulous, carefully designed cartoons. Once the Jazz Age was over, Held seemed antique, whereas Arno’s style not only kept going, but attracted several imitators.”

 

And last, but certainly not least, William Steig.  Mr. Steig, who died in 2003, began his New Yorker career in 1930.

  “I like his work.”