Exhibit of Interest: Mary Petty; Article of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist John Cuneo; The Tilley Watch Online; And Even More E. Simms Campbell

Exhibit of Interest: Mary Petty

 What fun! 30 Mary Petty watercolors on exhibit at the Huntsville (Alabama) Museum of Art:  The Life and Art of Mary Petty.

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Article of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist John Cuneo

From HV1, April 11, 2018, “Dancing Bears and John Cuneo’s Portable Therapy” — this good read about the fascinating Mr. Cuneo.

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The Tilley Watch Online: April 9-13

The week’s Daily Cartoons were courtesy of: Peter Kuper (Trump’s cabinet), Ellis Rosen (politics: Michael Cohen), Kim Warp ( Facebook), Brendan Loper (politics: Trump-related), and Paul Noth (taxes)

On Daily Shouts, contributing the New Yorker cartoonists were Maddie Dai, Kim Warp, and Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell

All of the above, and more, can be seen here.

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And Even More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

As the world turns, let’s not forget that Stephen Nadler continues his E. Simms Campbell fest on his wonderful blog.  So much to see there (here).

Here’s Mr. Campbell’s entry on the A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell (photo above) Born, 1906. Died, 1971. NYer work: 1932 -1942. Key collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist); More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

 

 

Robert Grossman, Illustrator, Cartoonist Extraordinaire: 1940-2018; The Tilley Watch Online

Robert Grossman, Illustrator, Cartoonist Extraordinaire, 1940 – 2018

  Robert Grossman a multi-talented artist with an instantly recognizable style, has passed away. Mr. Grossman enjoyed a spectacular career as an illustrator and cartoonist with his work appearing on the cover of numerous major publications. For far more information please go to Drew Friedman’s 2013 piece about Mr. Grossman’s career. 

In the early 1960s Mr. Grossman worked briefly as an assistant to the New Yorker‘s Art Editor, James Geraghty. He contributed two cartoons in the Geraghty years: January 13, 1962 (seen above) and December 14, 1963. His work returned to the magazine in the Tina Brown years in the form of six comic strips; his last contribution ran under David Remnick’s editorship.

( Mr. Grossman’s Yale Record parody cover of the New Yorker appears at the top of this piece)

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Trumpian cartoons were in the majority again this week in the Daily Cartoon slot:  a reflection on teachers & guns-in-the-classroom by Avi Steinberg, Stormy weather by Kim Warp, March Madness by Lars Kenseth, a tribute to Stephen Hawking by David Sipress (that was a ‘bonus” Daily), Trump & school walkouts was a team effort by Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley.  The week ended with Ellis Rosen‘s nod to the nationwide closing of the Toys r Us chain. 

Contributing cartoonists appearing on Daily Shouts: Emma Hunsinger, Will McPhail, and Ben Schwartz.

All the work (and more) can be seen here.

A Visit to “Jim’s Bench”; Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Tilley Watch Online; Live New Yorker Cartoons Part VI on Late Night with Seth Meyers

A Visit to “Jim’s Bench”

The filmmaker Sally Williams recently asked me if I’d like to meet with her at “Jim’s bench” on Central Park West and 77th Street, right across the street from the Museum of Natural History. I couldn’t possibly resist the invitation. Ms. Williams has been working on a documentary about James Stevenson for quite some time now; we’ve had numerous conversations over the years about Mr. Stevenson and, of course, The New Yorker. 

 Mr. Stevenson is on a long list of New Yorker cartoonists who have lived and worked in New York City (some still do) and whose work reflected their city. I think also of Steinberg and Alan Dunn as cases in point.

Sitting on this bench near where Mr. Stevenson lived I couldn’t help but imagine him experiencing the traffic, the sounds, sights, types of individuals bicycling by, walking by, running by; the dogs and dog-walkers, the flurry of activity at the museum. I could see it all in Stevenson’s style: gracefully casual, with spark. Ms. Williams confirmed that Mr. Stevenson was, like so many cartoonists, a watcher (I once likened cartoonists to sponges. Consciously or subconsciously, we take everything in).  

If you find yourself near the Museum of Natural History, you might want to take a seat on Jim’s bench and spend a few moments watching Manhattan go by, Stevenson-style. 

  The bench is the one closest to the Humboldt StatueIt bears a small plaque:

 (I’ve written about Mr. Stevenson here on the Spill a number of times.  Here’s one piece which might be of interest). 

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

Messrs. Max and Simon are back with thoughts & ratings on work by Frank Cotham, Carolita Johnson, Drew Dernavich, Avi Steinberg, Emily Flake, Roz Chast, Olivia de Recat, Mike Twohy, Bob Eckstein, Edward Koren, and Darrin Bell.  Read it here!

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Daily Cartoons this week by: Paul Noth, Mary Lawton, Kim Warp, David Sipress, and Lars Kenseth (4/5ths of the drawings were Trumpian).

And the contributing New Yorker cartoonists on Daily Shouts:  P.C. Vey, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, and JAK (with Hartley Lin).  

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Live New Yorker Cartoons Part VI on Late Night with Seth Meyers

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick returns to Late Night with Seth Meyers in the best segment yet. Cartoons by Carolita Johnson, Charlie Hankin, Will McPhail, Maddie Dai, and Ellis Rosen brought to life.   See them here!

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Photos from the Kovarsky Opening; “Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

Among the magazine’s Daily cartoons this week:  Kim Warp’s weary winter weather drawing; Brendan Loper’s tweeter-in-chief cartoon;  Lars Kenseth’s  take on this week’s  unusual White House media moment, and Peter Kuper’s Trumpian map of the world.   

Over on Daily Shouts, these were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen and Liana Finck

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Photos From the Kovarsky Opening at The Society of Illustrators

A packed house last night at the Society of Illustrators Opening Reception for Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker. Here’s an array of photos (all by Liza Donnelly, with one exception: the photo of Liza Donnelly and her husband– that’s courtesy of Gina Kovarsky)

Above: a wall of Kovarskys.

Below: Anatol Kovarsky’s daughter, Gina, and Mr. Kovarsky’s wife, Lucille Patton; Ellen Lind and John Lind.  Gina Kovarsky and John Lind co-curated the exhibit.

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Sam Gross and Felipe Galindo

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Liza Donnelly and Michael Maslin

Below: Sam Gross and New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein

Below: Writer/illustrator Mo Willems, Columbia University’s Curator for Comics and Cartoons, Karen Green, and John Lind

 

A closing thought on the exhibit, which runs til March 3 of this year:

This is a terrific show.  The energy bouncing off Mr. Kovarsky’s work on the walls is inspiring.   After looking at all of the covers and drawings I went back and spent more time looking at Mr. Kovarsky’s very first cartoon for the New Yorker.  It was published in the issue of March 1, 1947; here’s how it appeared:

I’ve always had a special affection for first New Yorker drawings.  It is, as they say, a moment.  Every cartoonist remembers the details surrounding their first published drawing. The unspoken mini-drama surrounding the first is that no one knows, of course, whether there’ll be a second (see the Spill‘s One Clubbers on the A-Z).  In Mr. Kovarsky’s case there was a second, and then there were hundreds more — close to 300 in fact. If that wasn’t something impressive in itself, he also contributed 40 covers.  And all this work was done in the relatively short time span of twenty-two years (according to Gina Kovarsky: “In the 1970s, Kovarsky shifted his main focus from cartooning to fine art…”).  It will not come as a surprise to anyone seeing this exhibit how Kovarsky accomplished so much in a mere two decades. It is as if he never set his pen or his brush down for a moment. Kovarsky’s world seemed to be abuzz 24/7. How lucky for us all.   

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“Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

From Westchester Magazine, January 12, 2018, “You Can Meet New Yorker Cartoonists…”

 Here’s a capsule description from the article:

“Not OK” — Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough is a collection of works by previous New Yorker-published cartoonists that fit exactly that bill. Curated by artist and Brooklynite David Ostow, this series has come to Westchester for a month-long showing following the completion of its original gallery run in Bushwick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tilley Watch Online; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind; A Reminder: Kovarsky Exhibit Now Up & Running at The Society of Illustrators

Tilley Watch Online

New Yorker cartoonists doing the Daily cartoon this week: Jeremy Nguyen (a new book rains down), David Sipress (dressing well for the cold), Kim Warp (big button stuff), and Brendan Loper (back in time, politically).

This week’s Daily Shouts New Yorker cartoonists: Tom Chitty (“Why You Shouldn’t Go Outside Today”),  Julia Wertz (“Conversations with Ma: Harry Potter and the Internet”), and Jason Adam Katzenstein & Phil McAndrew (“Mistakes You’re Going to Keep Making Forever”)

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion

Cartoons appearing in the issue of January 8th ’18, go under the microscope in this latest edition of the Cartoon Companion. See it here!

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

A fascinating and relaxed stroll through the issue of November 24, 1928. What fun it is, this blog. Read it here.

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And a Reminder: Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker

The Anatol Kovarsky exhibit at The Society of Illustrators is now open.   Go see!

Info here

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 29: Otto Soglow for Pepsi

 Aliens, Banned CDC words, special prosecutor Robert Mueller, and the Republicans’ tax bill — all explored this week on the Daily Cartoons slot via Kim Warp, Lars Kenseth, and David Sipress. Over on Daily Shouts, contributing cartoonist Emma Hunsinger’s “Meet the Corporatesens: A Working Family” appeared on Wednesday.   

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt.29: Otto Soglow for Pepsi

This is the third appearance of Mr. Soglow’s advertising work…and it won’t be the last.  His fun friendly line and characters were obviously irresistible to advertisers.  Here’s part of a 1942 series he did for Pepsi.

–For his generosity in allowing the Spill to post this work, a big round of applause once again for Warren Bernard.

Otto Soglow’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.