An Ink Spill Exclusive: Tom Toro’s 4 Page Playboy Spread; Attempted Bloggery, Past & Present; New Case For Pencils w/ Joana Avillez

An Ink Spill Exclusive: Tom Toro’s 4 Page Playboy Spread

Playboy‘s recently revived cartoon presence features Tom Toro in a big way, namely a four page spread in the July/August issue. Courtesy of Mr. Toro and Playboy, Ink Spill is pleased to show you the feature, “Travels With Toro” in its entirety (click on the work to enlarge): 

 

 

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Attempted Bloggery, Past & Present

Through the magic of Facebook or Twitter (can’t recall, and it’s not that important) I ran across mention of a three year old Attempted Bloggery post on the great artist Alajalov.  So, belatedly, here it is, from June 14, 2014: “Summing Up Constantin Alajalov”

(pictured left: Mr. Alajalov)

…and posted more  recently  this interesting Attempted Bloggery piece about Ray Rohn, a  New Yorker cover artist with one cover to his credit. “Ray Rohn: A Portrait of a Serviceman”

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A New Case For Pencils with Daily Shouts artist, Joana Avillez

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils is up, with this look at Joana Avillez‘s tools of the trade.  Ms. Avillez’s work has been seen on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts as well as in print on Shouts & Murmurs.

See it here!

Danny Shanahan Pencilled; Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview

Danny Shanahan Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s  latest Case For Pencils spotlights one of the greatest contemporary New Yorker cartoonists, Danny Shanahan.   See it here!

Below: Mr. Shanahan’s work area.

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Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview

The latest Cartoon Companion turned up early this week with a new look and a very fun read: an interview with Harry Bliss (it’s a two-parter…this is part one).  The CC will post again later this week with their customary rated reviews of the New Yorker‘s current issue cartoons.  Go here to read the interview.

Two Notes:

*It’s interesting that the subjects of the above two posts mention the two schools of thought regarding gagwriting and gagwriters.  Mr. Bliss uses them, Mr, Shanahan vows he never will.

*When you visit the new CC  you’ll see that they have very generously linked to the Spill.  My thanks to them. 

 

Color Work From Some Cartoon Greats; Audio: George Booth Talks Tools of the Trade

From Mike Lynch’s site, courtesy of Dick Buchanan, here’s a fun post of some color cartoon work from a variety of magazines. Included, among others, are New Yorker artists, William Steig, Garrett Price, Stan Hunt, William Von Riegen, Gahan Wilson, and Robert Day.

See them all here! 

 

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Jane Mattimoe has posted two short audio clips of the great George Booth talking about his tools of the trade.  Listen to them here

John Donohue on Drawing Disappearing Eateries; Julia Wertz is Pencilled; The Tilley Watch: The New New Yorker Masthead

From  newyorker.com, May 23, 2017, ““Drawing the Vanishing Restaurants of New York” — this post by John Donohue, who has been tirelessly attempting to draw all the restaurants in New York.

 

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Next up on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils blog is Julia Wertz, whose new book, Tenements, Towers & Trash: An Unconventional, Illustrated History of New York City will be out this coming October. 

A bunch of links to Ms. Wertz’s work, New Yorker and otherwise can be found on the Pencils post.

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…Stephen Nadler, who runs Attempted Bloggery, one of my fave New Yorker-related sites, notified me last night that someone had been busy monkeying around with Rea Irvin’s  iconic New Yorker masthead. Now’s a good time to take a look at how the masthead has changed (and when it changed) in the magazine’s 92 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is how it looked in the very first issue, February 21, 1925, with Of All Things beneath Rea Irvin’s design. The Talk of The Town was elsewhere in the issue, but would soon find a better fit…

 

 

 

 

 

…in the next issue, in fact: February 28, 1925 (above). The above masthead stuck around only half-a-year…

 

 

 

 

 

…until the issue of August 22 1925 (above), when it was obviously redrawn; the typeface changed too. 

 

 

 

 

 

In January 30, 1926 a cleaner, un-boxed masthead appeared, and again redrawn. This is the masthead most of us have known our entire lives.  It has stayed like this, unchanged, excepting the disappearance of the tiny little white dots on Eustace Tilley’s shoulder — they faded away somewhere in time.  A modern addition was a designery horizontal thin line above it in the anniversary issue of February 21, 2000. 

 

 

 

 

 

This brings us up to date. The above redesign first appeared in the issue of May 22, 2017.  Mr. Irvin’s charmingly imperfect scroll-like line has met a white-out brush.  His owl has been re-drawn, his buildings re-drawn too (with the inclusion of One World Trade Center in this new assortment).  Tilley himself has changed just a bit, from the neck up.  The designery horizontal line from 2000 remains (why toss out a perfectly good clean straight line?).  

A fond farewell to Mr. Irvin’s brilliant diamond.  Perhaps we’ll meet again?  

More Tilley: here’s a piece I wrote for newyorker.com back in 2008, “Tilley Over Time”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Rea Irvin Exhibit Recalled; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Ali Fitzgerald Pencilled

What fun: my three favorite New Yorker cartoon-related sites are present and accounted for today.

 

 

More New Yorker art history from Attempted Bloggery, which has unearthed yet another New York Times piece — this time about the spectacular Rea Irvin, who left his fingerprints all over the magazine (and they’re still all over it). I was lucky enough to attend the Irvin exhibit that the Times covered. The Museum of the City of New York did a bang-up job.  I hope they or some other great New York cultural institution has an exhibit in mind for the New Yorker‘s 100th birthday in 2025 (it’s never too early to start planning!).  Here’s the Attempted Bloggery post.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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The online New Yorker cartoon critics, Max and Simon are back with a look at the drawings in the May 1st issue, which includes a rescued kitty, a couple of snakes, and a police lineup. Read it here. Oh, and the CC’s “Mystery Cartoonist” also makes a short but succinct appearance.

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Jane Mattimoe’s  wonderful Case For Pencils blog  is back with the spotlight on Ali Fitzgerald’s tools of the trade.  Ms. Fitzgerald’s work has appeared on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts. See the Pencils post here.

Link here for Ms. Fitzgerald’s website

 

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Peter Steiner Pencilled; Jeremy Nguyen Profiled

Peter Steiner, who brought us this classic New Yorker cartoon, tells us about his tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils. Read it here!

Link to Peter Steiner’s website.

 

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Jeremy Nguyen, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker this past February, is the subject of this brief profile in Bedford + Bowery.

Link to Jeremy Nguyen’s website.