Books of Interest: The New Yorker Bon Appetit!, Thurber’s Favole Per Il Nostro Tempo, Steinberg’s Passaporto and The New Yorker Book of Katzen Cartoons

I occasionally travel the world without leaving my desk.  In this case a search of New Yorker cartoons on France’s Amazon site turned up this curiosity. Lookin’ sharp, Eustace!

There are plenty of variations on standard New Yorker cartoon collections (many with different covers designs). I wondered what a Thurber  title would look like in Italian and found  Thurber’s Fables For Our Time.

Sometimes, it’s just the translated title that catches my eye, such as the German cover for The New Yorker Book of Cat Cartoons. (hey, who doesn’t like katzen?).

A later edition (in Italian) of Steinberg’s Passport with an eye-catching cover: Passaporto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 8: James Thurber; Seth’s Sesquicentennial Piece

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 8: James Thurber (Bug-A-Boo Ads)

It was a real thrill seeing these Bug-A-Boo Thurber ads in the collection of scans offered to Ink Spill by Warren Bernard, cartoon collector extraordinaire. 

I wish we knew if Thurber wrote or at least tinkered with the copy.  The wording was obviously designed to resemble some of his work found in The New Yorker and in his collected works (four books by 1934, with a fifth appearing in the latter part of 1935, the year these ads appeared). 

Whatever the case, these drawings are delightful, and you can’t beat the very Thurberish sounding product name. 

 

Here’s Mr. Thurber’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

James Thurber (pictured above) Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously. Key anthology: The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). Link here to a short biography on the Thurber House site

 

 

 

 

 

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Seth’s Sesquicentennial Piece

        According to the Globe and Mail website, Seth is one of a group of writers, Canadian and otherwise, invited to celebrate Canada’s history in fiction.  Here’s a link to his piece, Hazel.

Seth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

— my thanks to cartoonist biographer, Mike Rhode for bringing Seth’s Hazel  piece to my attention

 

Thurber’s Dogs Set to Music; The Spill Responds to a Response; Time Traveling: Saturday Evening Post Cartoons From the 1950s

Thurber’s Dogs Set to Music

Attempted Bloggery has posted this curio: Thurber’s Dogs set to the music of Peter Schickele.  Until yesterday, I’d never heard of this. 

It’s not the first time Thurber’s work has crossed over from print to music. In one of the many high points of Thurber’s career, his best-seller, The Thurber Carnival was transformed into a  a very successful playwith Thurber himself taking the stage. 

A soundtrack for the show was issued –it includes a booklet of his drawings.

The play won a Special Tony Award in 1960.  Video exists of Thurber accepting the award (with Burgess Meredith). You can see it here (Thurber takes the stage at the 25:50 mark).

 

 

 

 

 

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Blog of Interest

In response to The Spill‘s mention of Arnold Zwicky’s Blog the other day,  Mr. Zwicky posted this on his site:

“Note from Michael Maslin on his Inkspill blog (“New Yorker Cartoonists News and Events”), appearing as a comment on a recent posting of mine here:

As you see, Mr. Zwicky’s blog is “mostly about language”; when it’s about the language of New Yorker cartoons it will be mentioned here

This could get burdensome. I’ve posted here over a hundred times about New Yorker cartoons and covers; these are indexed in a Page on this blog, with subpages for (so far) 25 specific artists…”

Ink Spill’s response to Mr. Zwicky’s response:

Dear Mr. Zwicky,

It is a burden The Spill will happily bear.

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Time-Traveling: Saturday Evening Post Cartoons From the 1950s

Mike Lynch’s has posted Eisenhower-era  Saturday Evening Post cartoons (and a few that appeared in Collier’s) including this one from the late great New Yorker cartoonist,  Barney Tobey.

Here’s Mr. Tobey’s A-Z entry on the Spill:

Barney Tobey (photo above from Think Small, a book of humor produced by Volkswagon) Born in New York City, July, 18, 1906, died March 27, 1989, New York. New Yorker work: 1929 -1986. Essential collection: B. Tobey of The New Yorker (Dodd Mead & Co., 1983)

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Note:  An exhibit of Bob Mankoff’s work will run from July 20 through Oct. 20 at the Charles P. Sifton Gallery in the Theodore Roosevelt United States Courthouse in Brooklyn.

 

 

 

 

A Couple of Visual Primers: Thurber & Steinberg

Here are two Pinterest  destinations that are a fun way to start off this shortened work week.  During my usual morning Google search I came across “131 Best Images about Saul Steinberg”  and thought it funny that the page was “131 best images”  — “131” seemed very Steinbergian.  Also found:  “Best 25+ James Thurber Ideas” — surely Mr. Thurber had at least as many best ideas as Steinberg.  Oh well.

I really liked scrolling through these pages — they’re a quick way to brush up on, or be reinvigorated by, the fabulous graphic worlds of Steinberg and Thurber, while getting a sense of their iconic styles all across the graphic board: New Yorker cartoons (drawings), covers, book jackets, advertisements. And, bonus:  there are photographs as well. 

 

Objet D’art of Interest: A Thurber Bobblehead

Well here it is: the ultimate (?) gift for a Thurberite.  I’m not sure if any other New Yorker artist has been so honored.  A quick search for an Addams bobblehead and a Steinberg bobblehead turned up nada (I would love to see a Steinberg bobblehead).  

As you can see on the packaging, the bobblehead was issued as part of Columbus Ohio’s bicentennial.

The only similar object I’ve ever seen was a small painted plaster Eustace Tilley figurine. Neither the Tilley nor the Thurber objets d’art are in the Spill‘s archives, but one can dream.

The Thurber bobblehead can be found on Ebay for a song.

 

 

How A Cartoonist Falls In Love With Cartoons; A Thurber Home For Sale

From The Daily Beast, May 20, 2017, “This Is How A Cartoonist Falls In Love With Cartoons” — a piece by Anthony Haden-Guest (with Charles Addams content), His exhibit, The Further Chronicles of Now is at Anderson Contemporary, 180 Maiden Lane, NYC, until June 9th. .

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From Connecticut’s News-Times , April 7, 2017, “James Thurber Slept Here” — this piece about a Thurber home for sale.

— my thanks to the New Yorker writer, Bill Franzen for passing along this piece.