The New Yorker’s First Fourth

 This stunning Ilonka Karasz cover graced the New Yorker‘s first fourth of July issue. Ms. Karasz  contributed a remarkable 187 covers to the magazine; her first was on the 7th issue, April 4, 1925, her last appeared on the issue of October 22, 1973. Of note within the issue: this Helen Hokinson drawing appearing on the Talk of The Town’s lead page:

In 1925, Ms. Hokinson, newly arrived in New York (from Chicago) enrolled at Parsons School of Design. According to Liza Donnelly’s book Funny Ladies:

One day [Hokinson’s] instructor sent the students out to sketch in the streets of New York. Hokinson drew an elderly woman waving goodbye to a departing ocean liner. Upon her return to the classroom, her teacher, Howard Giles, laughed and suggested she take this and other drawings to the new magazine down the street.

This simple drawing of a woman waving immediately won over Harold Ross and Rea Irvin. Her work had an ease to it: Ross recognized the humor in her line quality, but also in what she chose to draw. Ross purchased her first submission and invited her to return every Tuesday  with more sketches for consideration.

Latest Addition to Ink Spill’s Archives: “Drawings of the Theatre 1927” with Arno, Karasz, Birnbaum, and Covarrubias; More Spills: Bob Eckstein Cracks Wise for The New York Times on Debate Night; Donnelly Live-Tweet Draws Debate for CBS News

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Thanks to the generosity of the illustrator Tom Bloom (who is an  indefatigable collector of cartoon-related books & ephemera)  Drawings of the Theatre 1927 has been added to the archives. I’d not heard of or seen this until a few weeks ago. Published just two years after Arno started at The New Yorker it’s an excellent example of how quickly his star was rising in the publishing world. New Yorker aficionados will also recognize some of the company he kept: the great cover artist, Ilonka Karasz (187 covers between 1925 and 1973)  Abe Birnbaum (141 covers and 9 cartoons in a career that lasted from 1929 through 1974) and Miguel Covarrubias (7 cartoons, all published in 1925).

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This is a small pamphlet, measuring 4″ x 6″, that opens up like a file folder.   Four attached postcards are slipped into the right side, each postcard featuring one of these four New Yorker artists. . The work of the two non-New Yorker artists, Gil Spear and Samuel Rogers appear on the pamphlet itself — those portraits you see running vertically along the right edge.

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More Spills Icon Edited…Bob Eckstein has posted on Facebook: “I hope you watch [tonight’s] debate along with The New York times website where they will have me doing commentary, doodles and cracking wise.”   (Link to Mr. Eckstein’s exploits on the Times’ site  here).

While you’re waiting to link to the Times, don’t forget to pre-order his forthcoming book, Footnotes From The World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments from Book Buyers, Book Sellers, and Book Lovers.  Out October 4th. Eckstein's books

 

 

 

 

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…And  Liza Donnelly will be Live Tweet-Drawing the debate for CBS News.  You can find her work on Instagram:

and on Twitter: 

NYC Subway Car of Interest: Mark Alan Stamaty’s Illustrated Shuttle; More Spills… Harry Bliss in a Salinger Home… the new Swann Catalog with Original Art by 18 New Yorker Artists

timessquare-grandcentralshuttlemarkstamatyRead all about Mark Alan Stamaty’s NYC illustrated subway car on Mike Lynch‘s blog here.

 

Mr. Stamaty’s New Yorker debut was with this cover in November of 1992. Here’s a link to his website.

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Bliss

From newyorker.com, September 8, 2016,  “Salinger’s House, Artists Retreat” — the New Yorker‘s Sarah Larson visits Harry Bliss in a Salinger home, now owned by the cartoonist.

 

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The new Swann catalog is now available online.  Anyone interested in original New Yorker art will absolutely love looking through.  New Yorker artists represented (both cartoonists and cover artists) are Charles Addams, Frank Modell, Ed Fisher, Tom Toro, William Steig, James Stevenson, Mischa Richter, Barbara Shermund,  Ilonka Karasz,   Laura Jean Allen, Beatrice Szanton, John Jonik, Peter Arno, Ludwig Bemelmans, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Richard Decker, Arthur Getz, and Leonard Weisgard.

The New Yorker’s First July 4th Cover

IKThe New Yorker‘s first issue was dated February 21, 1925. When the magazine’s first opportunity for a July 4th cover arrived it was handled by  Ilonka Karasz, already a veteran New Yorker cover artist. She had also provided the April 4th, April 25th, and May 30th covers, just one cover short of tying Rea Irvin, who had provided 5 covers by July (including, of course, the magazine’s very first cover).

Ms. Karasz went on to contribute 183 more covers  following this incredible 4th of July 3D-like beauty   (her last cover appeared October 22, 1977).  There’s a good sized Wikipedia entry on her life & career.

To see more of her covers, visit The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank here.