Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Tom Toro Talks Trump; Messing Around With The New Yorker’s Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the latest installment of The Cartoon Companion:  Ed Steed’s fowl: chickens or ducks?…plus Dernavich’s refrigerator, Cotham’s stairway to heaven, and more.

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Tom Toro has been drawing a lot of Trumps lately.  He talks about the experience on the Huffington Post: “New Yorker Cartoonist Explains Why Humor is the Heartbeat of Democracy”

Link here to Mr. Toro’s website

 

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The latest New Yorker features a Russian-inspired Eustace Tilley and Rea Irvin typeface.

You might wonder when the magazine has played with its look before.  Here are just a few examples:

 

Rea Irvin (of course!) broke  the mold first. Jan 2, 1932

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S. Liam Dunne in 1934

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rea Irvin (again) in 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The one-and-only Helen Hokinson in 1948

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Stevenson in 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Stevenson again in 1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen Hokinson on A Case For Pencils; A “New” Cartoonist from 1999; Swann Galleries New Yorker Cartoon Offerings

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils post features the late very great Helen Hokinson. Take a look!

Ms. Hokinson’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

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This morning while revisiting Thomas Kunkel’s Man In Profile: Joseph Mitchell of The New Yorker (Random House, 2015), I came across a passage about  former New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb speaking of his meetings with Mr. Mitchell. The source of the quote led me to the 1999  New Yorker anniversary issue (with an Edward Sorel cover. Eustace Tilley was relegated to a small box on the advertising flap partially obscuring the cover) where Mark Singer’s “Joe Mitchell’s Secret” appears.  On the way to Mr. Singer’s piece I came upon a cartoon by a cartoonist that somehow missed my attention while compiling Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:   Ham Khan.

This is the first and only appearance (at this date) by Ham Khan in the magazine. The number of new cartoonists brought in by Bob Mankoff since he became Cartoon Editor has risen to 129.

Ink Spill will eventually take a close look at how this influx of cartoonists compares to Mr. Mankoff’s predecessors, James Geraghty (1939-1973) and Lee Lorenz (1973-1997).

 

 

 

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The Swann Galleries latest catalog is online.  It’s much fun for those who love original cartoon and cover art from The New Yorker.

Shown here: a gorgeous cover by Arthur Getz.

Mr. Getz’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913;  died, 1996. NYer work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career  was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published,  and one cover).    According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

 

 

A Time-Out with Helen Hokinson

hokinson-paris-is-a-womans-town-636

 

Here are two obscure Helen Hokinson book jackets, courtesy of Tom Bloom, without whom the Ink Spill Library would be a far less interesting place. The title above was published in 1929 by Coward-McCann.  The title below was published in 1933 by MacMillan.  Mr. Bloom had this to say about What Shall I Eat?:

 

“[It’s] a curious item–in that it is a very bare-bones production. The back of the dust jacket is totally blank, and the interior pages take
a little time to get to the body of the book. The inside flap describes the illustrations by Helen Hokinson “in the style of her famous
New Yorker Sketches.” This is basically a dietary book with recipes and planned meals, 10 illustrations, about the size of a small novel.

 

book-dj-helen-hokinson-what-shall-i-eat-gh-a-debutante-665
Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:
helen_hokinson
Helen Hokinson Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

“Bending of Lines: The Women of Cartooning” Exhibit at the Kenosha Festival of Cartooning; More Spills with Liza Donnelly and Bob Eckstein

KFOC+2016+KPM+Poster+image+SSThe Kenosha (Wisconsin) Festival of Cartooning is almost upon us (September 15 – 17).  Three days of presentations as well as an exhibit of original work by over 30 artists, including the likes of Helen Hokinson*, Liza Donnelly, Trina Robbins, Isabella Bannerman,  Rina Piccolo, Maria Scrivan, Hilda Terry, Ramona Fradon, Jen Sorensen & Hilary Price.  Details here.

*bolded names are New Yorker contributors

 

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More Spills Icon Edited

arts Mid-Hudson logoMs. Donnelly will also be in an exhibit closer to home this Fall, joining me in a show of some of our New Yorker cartoons at Arts Mid-Hudson .  Details here.

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Bob Eckstein‘s eagerly awaited  Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments from Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers is the subject of Brenda Cronin’s  Wall Street Journal  article (& video), “Bob Eckstein’s Tribute to Beloved Bookstores”

Eckstein's books

 

 

A Reminder: There’s A Mary Petty Exhibit Happening in Pensacola

MPI was reminded today while reading an article that there is right this very moment an exhibit of Mary Petty’s work at the Pensacola Museum of Art. Here’s a link.

Shown here is my favorite cover of hers (I’ve no idea if it’s in the exhibit), and one of my favorite New Yorker covers of all-time (let’s say it’s in the top 100).

In that issue of August 4, 1945 are two cartoons by Ms. Petty’s husband, Alan Dunn as well as two by the great Helen Hokinson. Also in the issue are drawings by: Steinberg, Robert Day (a full page!), Whitney Darrow, Jr., Otto Soglow, Julian de Misky (a sequential drawing running over the gutter and onto the following page), Eric Ericson, Sam Cobean, Charles Addams, Garrett Price, Perry Barlow, and Chon Day. For anyone interested in why this era was called the golden age of New Yorker cartooning, seek out and enjoy the artistry of these contributors. (it’s available to New Yorker subscribers online; it’s also available on  the Complete New Yorker, and any library still holding bound New Yorkers).   

 

George Booth: An Ink Spill Appreciation

Screen+Shot+2016-06-30+at+12.21.02+AMAttempted Bloggery has been focusing on George Booth this past week (including a close look at the drawing shown here), and why not? Mr. Booth turned 90 the other day; what better time to sing his praises and talk about what he brought to the New Yorker when his work first  appeared in the magazine in 1969. Mr. Booth’s style was a brand new creature, unlike anything the magazine had published before.

Booth arrived at the tail end of a decade that saw the introduction of a tidal wave of new artists appearing in The New Yorker: J.B. Handelsman in 1961, Charles Barsotti in 1962, Edward Koren in 1962, Robert Weber in 1962, Henry Martin in 1964, Donald Reilly in 1964, Edward Frascino in 1965, Mort Gerberg in 1965, Peter Porges in 1965, Ronald Searle in 1966, Dean Vietor in 1967, Rowland B. Wilson in 1961, Vahan Shirvanian in 1968,  Sam Gross in 1969 and George Booth in 1969.

Looking at the dates of entry, one can see how carefully James Geraghty (the magazine’s Art Editor at the time; he was hired by Harold Ross as Art Editor in 1939) had  infused the magazine with new blood. These fifteen arrivals  were scattered  over the course of a decade, fitting easily into (and not displacing) the existing pool of talent. In the best tradition of the magazine’s art department, they all brought something of lasting value to the magazine.  Indeed, every one of them had long careers.

Mr. Booth was and is no exception. His use of reappearing characters is somewhat akin to  Helen Hokinson’s so-called “lunch ladies” and Syd Hoff’s Bronx families of the the 1930s as well as George Price’s eclectic characters appearing in his drawings all through his long career. Booth, however, revisits specific characters in his work, people we’ve come to know and in situations we’ve grown to love:  the man in the claw-foot bath tub, for instance, or the garage mechanics in their oily splotched coveralls, or Mawmaw, a character based on his mother.  Henry Martin once said to me that certain cartoonists “draw funny” (trust me, it’s a highly complimentary remark).  Booth draws funny.  Before you reach the caption, the drawing itself has already begun working on you the way the very thought  of Charlie Chaplin works on you. No one draws like Booth.  As a beginning cartoonist I found his graphic mastery intimidating.  But it was also, of course, highly educational.  Look at the way he’s drawn the ceiling and the ceiling fan in the drawing accompanying this piece; the inclusion of the floor boards found behind cafe counters; the characters in wash in the background.  Each one of those customers has a story.  The two cooks in the foreground (Laurel & Hardy types) are perfect, most especially the smaller fellow. This is a scene out of life filtered through Booth’s comic genes.  These elements of style are what Booth does best. Lee Lorenz (who succeeded James Geraghty as Art Editor in 1974) once said that the best cartoonists are the ones who bring their own world into their work. In all of his work for the magazine in all these years Booth has stayed true to his world. He is, by definition, one of the best.

 

More Booth:

Here’s a George Booth interview  conducted by Richard Gehr in 2013

and David Owen’s  Profile of Mr. Booth in The New Yorker in 1998

All of Mr. Booth’s cartoon collections can easily be found on AbeBooks.com

A selection of both Booth’s drawings and covers (and even a few products adorned with his drawings) can be found on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.