A Moose in The Hoose; Material Goods: The New Yorker Diary 2018 & Tilley Pins

A Moose In The Hoose

Here’s a fun looking book I ran into online yesterday.  Had never seen or heard of it before.  The author, Frank Sullivan, and illustrator, George Price, are familiar, of course. Mr. Price had quite a side career as an illustrator (the Spill library has a number of the books he illustrated, but not this one).

I believe that Mr. Price was the New Yorker‘s most prolific artist interpreter — that is to say, he never worked from his own ideas but relied entirely on writers.*  My source on this is Lee Lorenz, the magazine’s former art editor (and later cartoon editor), who was Mr. Price’s editor for nearly twenty years.

* The exception was Mr. Price’s one New Yorker cover (below), which, obviously, was caption-less. What a beauty!

 

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z including the cover of a Spill favorite collection of his, published in 1977:

Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. He contributed nearly 1300 cartoons to the New Yorker.

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Material Goods

Perhaps this should’ve been mentioned in yesterday’s Monday Tilley Watch… but it wasn’t. Several ads in this week’s New Yorker are worth noting.  The first is for the magazine’s wonderful yearly diary.  It’s usually loaded with cartoons. The ad copy says there’s “a cartoon on every page”…hmmm, I think the example shown in the ad, and the samples shown on the magazine’s store contradict that, but whatever. There are always plenty of cartoons,  meaning it might be the closest thing we’ve had as an annual collection these past many decades.

The other ad, headlined A Dash Of New Yorker Style , is for some of the stuff that is sold on the magazine’s “official store”; as one who is a sucker for anything Tilley, I think the keepers here are the Eustace Tilley pin and the butterfly that is usually fluttering just off of Eustace’s nose.

Below: the ads in this week’s New Yorker:

Arno Olio #2: Comic Relief

Here’s a favorite obscure Peter Arno cover, executed for Comic Relief: An Omnibus of Modern American Humor, published in 1932,  edited by Robert N. Linscott. There are but four drawings in the collection, none by Arno (one’s a Thurber drawing from Is Sex Necessary, his 1929 collaboration with E.B. White; two drawings accompany Corey Ford pieces, and one drawing appears with an Ogden Nash contribution). The book is loaded with work by many of the big names of the day: Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, Frank Sullivan, Don Marquis, Marc Connelly, Milt Gross among them.

Arno Comic Relief dj