Blitt and Kuper on Society of Illustrators Panel; Gil Roth Roth Interviews Glen Baxter; Another Look at Abner Dean; Felipe Galindo In Conference on Political Satire in Latin America; A Case For Pencils’ Pencils




Last Minute Notice!

“Can Art Affect Social Change?”  Barry Blitt and Peter Kuper, among others, will discuss tonight at The Society of Illustrators.  Details here



Check out Gil Roth’s wonderful interview with Glen Baxter on Mr. Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast here.

(Mr. Baxter talks about coming to The New Yorker in the Robert Gottlieb era).

While on the Virtual Memories site also be sure to take a look at past episodes, especially the long list of cartoonists (full disclosure, this cartoonist is among those listed).



dean jacket.inddFrom New York Review Comics comes a new edition of Abner Dean’s What Am I Doing Here? originally published in 1947.  Read Mark Frauenfelder’s piece on it here on Boing Boing.

Here’s Mr. Dean’s entry on Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC.  According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.”  He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven  (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960. 



71440 Felipe Galindo  (aka Feggo) is participating in  Bitter Laughter: A Conference on Political Satire and Press Freedom in Latin America — a conference taking place in New York City this coming Saturday:  Details here.



a-case-for-pencils-logoJane Mattimoe, who runs the wonderfully informative blog, A Case For Pencils, wherein New Yorker cartoonists share their tools of the trade, is sharing her own tools of the trade this week.  Check it out here.

Out Today! Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist

Arno cover














My thanks to Karen Green of Columbia University for last night’s wonderful send-off for Arno at Butler Library.  And thanks too to Edward Sorel for co-piloting the program with me.

A big thank you to all who attended, including those from my New Yorker family: Roxie Munro, George Booth, Tom Bloom, Sam Gross, Robert Leighton, Felipe Galindo, David Borchart, Liza Donnelly, Peter Kuper and Bob Eckstein.

From the book’s afterword, where 60 New Yorker cartoonists talk about Arno,  here’s what George Booth had to say:

 Peter Arno’s work stands out and holds up in the test of time. His drawings and words were never timid, or just clever. They stated high quality, joy, confidence, strength, style, humor, idea, life, simplicity. His color was right; black and white became color. His cartoons were researched, with words well applied. The communication was clear and timely. He knew what he was doing. Peter Arno was an artist who gave something of value to the world. A hero.

Photos of Interest: Sam Gross and Company; Attempted Bloggery’s Arno Week

Courtesy of Bob Eckstein,  a quartet of photographs from last night’s event celebrating Sam Gross‘s work. [From the top: Sam Gross; a projected Gross drawing; David Borchart, Felipe Galindo (aka Feggo), and Amy Kurzweil, a brand new New Yorker cartoonist (her first cartoon appeared in the April 4th issue); Mr. Gross and long -time contributor, Mort Gerberg]



-5 -3 -4-2

















Sam Gross’s Wikipedia page

Bob Eckstein’s website

Felipe Galindo’s website

Amy Kurzweil’s website

Mort Gerberg’s website











Attempted Bloggery has had plenty of interesting Peter Arno posts this week.  Check ’em out!


…and from the Department of Self-promotion: 

just six days til Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist is released. Pre-order here.Arno cover 2

An Excellent Interview with Roz Chast; Felipe Galindo Pencilled; A New Cartoon From Peter Steiner

Roz photo 2016

From Design Matters,  Debbie Millman’s  interview with Roz Chast.

Link to Ms. Chast’s website here.






Courtesy of Eugenio Castro
[photo:  Eugenio Castro]
The latest subject on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils blog: Felipe Galindo (aka Feggo).  See it here!

Link here to Mr. Galindo’s website.






Hopeless but

Ever alert to Peter Steiner‘s  blog, Hopeless But Not Serious, Ink Spill  sends you over there to see his latest cartoon.


Link here to Mr. Steiner’s website.

Fave New Yorker Holiday Party Pix

It happened last night: The New Yorker’s first Holiday Party way downtown near its new offices in The World Trade Center.  The venue was dark (see photos), small, and filled with throbbing music. The joint was packed (yes, like sardines) with happy folk. Saw Calvin Trillin  anchored near the entrance, while the magazine’s editor, David Remnick shouldered through the crowd, stopping to chat here and there. I believe that Mark Singer (or someone who looked like him) and I passed like ships in the night. Also spotted: 2014’s winner of The Thurber Prize, John Kenney, and the magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.

A number of cartoonists were present. Top photo: a blurry Felipe Galindo (whose exhibit “New York Stories” just opened at The Mark Miller Gallery), and David Borchart. 2nd photo: Ben Schwartz and Joe Dator.  3rd: Andy Friedman (sometimes aka Larry Hat) and Liana Finck.  4th: Amy Hwang, Liza Donnelly, P.C. Vey and Charlie Hankin. 5th: Drew Dernavich in the middle of the crowd. 6th: Danny Shanahan and Robert Leighton. Felipe and David[all photos courtesy of Liza Donnelly]


Ben and JoeAndy and LianaAmy, Liza, Peter and LizaDrewDanny and Robert 2





























Other cartoonists present who escaped the camera: Barbara Smaller, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Bob Mankoff(The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, and New York Times bestselling author for his memoir, How About Never — Is Never Good For You?), the one and only Sam Gross, David Sipress, Mort Gerberg, Corey Pandolph, and Marisa Acocella Marchetto (whose graphic novel, Ann Tenna hit The New York Times Bestseller list this year).