The New Yorker’s 91st Anniversary Issue

NYer ann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the newsstands this week and next (because it’s a double issue): The New Yorker Anniversary issue (yes, it’s called that on the Table of Contents).

 

Eustace Tilley, as you can see by the cover, has returned, albeit not Rea Irvin’s original.

 

Small ChangeS Noted:

At the bottom of the Table of Contents, the typeface used for the Drawings (meaning cartoons) has returned to this font…

font back

 

…after a brief flirtation with the font below  as part of the magazine’s re-design of certain sections (Goings On About Town, etc.):

font

 

ALSO: Was happy to see the (refined*) Rea Irvin typeface has returned to the following headings: Goings On About Town, Classical Music, Art, Night Life, Movies, The Theatre, and Above & Beyond.  (oddly, Food & Drink is still hanging in there with interlocking “oo”s — a use that goes back to the version of the font in the earliest issues).

*refined meaning that the Irvin typeface was once less perfect along its edges than it is today.  Examples:old Irvin

old

&

new

Irvin new

The New Yorker Celebrates its 90th

Eustace Tilley's Fanned Out.

Over on The New Yorker’s website there is much to dig into: cartoon slide shows from various decades, selected classic pieces, covers.   Go here to see what’s going on.

 

Note: Alas, Rea Irvin’s classic cover of the magazine’s mascot does not appear this week. Nine contemporary takes on Tilley appear instead. I took the above photo to accompany my essay “Tilley Over Time” on the magazine’s website, August of 2008.

Eustace Tilley Bids Adieu, Again

Eustace 2Eustace Tilley (via Bruce McCall) bids adieu to Times Square on the cover of this week’s New Yorker.  The magazine begins work in its new headquarters at 1 World Trade this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s top-hatted mascot bid goodbye once before, back in August of 1937, when Otto Soglow gave us Tilley, not in a Cadillac, but in the back of a  Victoria, and embarking from The Plaza Hotel, not Times Square.   Back then,  Tilley was substituting for E.B. White, who had decided on taking a leave of absence from New York & The New Yorker.  The drawing appeared at the bottom of White’s farewell Talk of The Town piece.  A tearful Thurber dog follows close by the rear wheel. Eustace tips his hat to two waving women in black, holding muffs: Peter Arno’s Whoops Sisters.

 

White's goodbye

Rea Irvin Parodies His Eustace Tilley New Yorker Cover

Irvin_Jonkey209

 

An exceptionally generous friend of Ink Spill recently donated a bundle of rare New Yorker ephemera to the archives. I’ll post some from time-to-time, beginning with this wonderful parody of the New Yorker‘s very first cover.  There have been a number of parodies of the Eustace Tilley cover over the years, but until this piece arrived in the mail I’d only seen one other Tilley parody executed by Rea Irvin, the man responsible for the magazine’s inaugural cover.  In 1926 he designed a cover for an in-house parody of the magazine — Harold Ross, the magazine’s founder, was Tilley.

The Jonkey Club founded in 1949, was designed to entertain tourists while bringing in charity funds. The big event, held on Washington’s birthday, involved a donkey race, with donkeys decked out in elaborate and colorful costumes.

 

 

Below: Irvin’s Ink Spill entry

 

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

 

Bob Eckstein on Live-Drawing the Oscars; Liza Donnelly Live Tweet-Draws the Oscars; Barbara Smaller takes over the Daily Cartoon

-1Bob Eckstein will be live-drawing the Oscars for The New Yorker‘s website later on today. Link here for the magazine’s coverage. According to a Facebook post,  he’ll also provide commentary.

I asked Bob to talk a little about the big night and here’s what he had to say:

 

I’m more excited than usual about tonight’s Oscars. This time I will be glued to the TV set with a Wacom tablet pen in one hand and a cocktail wienie in the other. My wife will be mingling and whispering in my ear what the vibe is at our friend’s fancy Oscars party and what everyone thinks of the dresses and selections. Our friend Carla, who is throwing the bash, is excited about being included in the piece and promised to save some food for me since I will be drawing non-stop.

How was I lucky enough to get this opportunity? I was lucky. And it’s a numbers game more than anything. I’ve been drawing and writing for The New York Times for over 30 years! I started with a page illustration in the magazine section when I was just a teenager. I’m not sure if I came up with the idea or someone else did but about five years ago it was suggested I draw the Super Bowl in real time. I think I pushed to just write jokes and skip the drawings. That seemed like more fun. And less work.

Anyhoo, that exposure lead to this job and otherwise I wouldn’t be drawing tonight but just stuffing my face with Oscar-shaped macaroons. You may ask, what do I know about movies.  I watched most of the nominated pictures?  I will say that for years I wrote, including reviews, for the Village Voice, Newsday and other publications. My wife and I met in art school where we were both film majors (and of course I studied film history).

As a DVD extra I’ll add that she won a student Emmy and absolutely hated my guts. I switched in my last year to an Illustration major. Twelve years later we ran into each other again at a mutual friend’s funeral. We were asked to curate the deceased friend’s retrospective together. And shortly afterwards we eloped to Iceland.

(above: Eckstein’s Oscar-wielding Tilley).

 

Further reading

Link to Bob Eckstein’s website: bobeckstein.com

Link here to see Bob Eckstein’s New Yorker work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

 

 And…

Donnelly: Oscars

Over on The Nib, Liza Donnelly, fresh from her Olympics live-tweet drawing, is live tweet-drawing the Oscars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And…

daily_cartoon_banner_smaller

Barbara Smaller takes over The New Yorker‘s Daily Cartoon today, following Tom Toro.  Link here to see her first contribution.

The New Yorker’s 89th Anniversary Issue

CVC_TNY_02_17_14_580px

 

A very happy 89th  birthday to The New Yorker.   While there’s no classic Eustace Tilley cover this year (the last time we saw Tilley as Rea Irvin* intended was in 2011, we do have, according to the Art Editor, Francoise Mouly, “the first published Tilley painted on an iPhone”; inside the magazine, not including the drawings on the Caption Contest page, are sixteen cartoons by fifteen cartoonists (Joe Dator‘s work appears twice). Two of the drawings contain some color (a cartoon by Ben Schwartz & one by Edward Steed).  Color cartoons were once so unusual in the magazine that when they appeared in The New Yorker‘s 64th anniversary issue in 1989, N.R. Kleinfield wrote a piece about it for The New York Times (“Inside New Yorker, a Splash of Color”). The color appeared in a four page spread by William Steig.

 

 

*Below: Rea Irvin’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

Below: the first issue of The New Yorker, February 21, 1925.  Cover by Rea Irvin.

Irvin