Charlie Hankin Speaks; Christoph Niemann Profiled on Netflix’s “Abstract”; Eustace Tilley’s Non-Anniversary Cover Appearances

 

 

This piece on  Charlie Hankin, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2013:  “Catching Up with New Yorker cartoonist and Park School grad Charlie Hankin” (The Baltimore Sun, March 4, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link here to Mr. Hankin’s website.

 

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Christoph Niemann, who’s contributed nearly two dozen covers to The New Yorker (and plenty of illustrations) is the subject of episode #1 in the Netflix series “Abstract”–  here’s a link to the Netflix site (where Netflix  offers a free trial…I’m not promoting Netflix, just offering the information).  — My thanks to New Yorker cover aritst, John Cuneo for bringing this series to my attention.

Link here to Mr. Niemann’s website where you can see an abundance of his work.

 

 

 

 

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There’s been a lot of Eustace Tilley talk on Ink Spill lately — below is Mr. Niemann’s take on Rea Irvin’s masterpiece. Titled “Icon” it appeared on The New Yorker, May 27 2002. It was a rare non-anniversary Tilley inspired cover appearance. I can only think of three other such occasions. They appear below Mr. Niemann’s cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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More non-anniversary Tilley-inspired cover appearances: Barry Blitt in 1999, Bob Zoell in 2002, and Ana Juan in 2005

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Tom Toro Talks Trump; Messing Around With The New Yorker’s Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the latest installment of The Cartoon Companion:  Ed Steed’s fowl: chickens or ducks?…plus Dernavich’s refrigerator, Cotham’s stairway to heaven, and more.

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Tom Toro has been drawing a lot of Trumps lately.  He talks about the experience on the Huffington Post: “New Yorker Cartoonist Explains Why Humor is the Heartbeat of Democracy”

Link here to Mr. Toro’s website

 

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The latest New Yorker features a Russian-inspired Eustace Tilley and Rea Irvin typeface.

You might wonder when the magazine has played with its look before.  Here are just a few examples:

 

Rea Irvin (of course!) broke  the mold first. Jan 2, 1932

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S. Liam Dunne in 1934

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rea Irvin (again) in 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The one-and-only Helen Hokinson in 1948

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Stevenson in 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Stevenson again in 1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being Eustace Tilley; Roger Angell Remembers James Stevenson; Oscar Time! Liza Donnelly Back on the Red Carpet Live Drawing the Oscars, Drooker’s Oscar Cover, Eckstein’s Oscar Wielding Eustace

 

 

Eustace Tilley is of course a fictional character — commonly referred to as The New Yorker‘s mascot.  There is a suggested backstory to Tilley himself in Lee Lorenz’s Art of The New Yorker: 1925-1995; there are best guesses elsewhere as to why Rea Irvin (see below) decided to submit the cover to Harold Ross to adorn Ross’s inaugural issue and there are probably just as many best guesses as to why Ross chose to use Irvin’s submission.

Following the advent of the New Yorker, it didn’t take long for a Tilley stand-in to show up; a New Yorker in-house publication featured Harold Ross as Tilley and Alexander Woollcott as the butterfly hovering at Tilley’s eye-level.  Over the years there have been innumerable parody New Yorkers (Ink Spill has a selection here).  But how many real people, after Harold Ross, have stood in for Tilley on a New Yorker cover or on another magazine’s cover.

If you search online you’ll see perhaps hundreds of Tilley stand-ins, some on the cover of The New Yorker itself, many submitted to the New Yorker as part of a contest, many just for personal amusement (Tilley as Disney’s Goofy, or Mad’s Alfred E. Neuman, Dr. Seuss’s Cat In The Hat, etc., etc.)    But here I’m concentrating on published covers featuring real people (and one real dog) as Tilley.   I’ve found just a few (please let me know of others that fit this category…update: my thanks to Attempted Bloggery for reminding me about the Eustace Clinton/Obama cover ):

 

First the real deal: Rea Irvin’s classic cover:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker‘s in-house issue featuring Harold Ross.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Renata Adler as Tilley on Manhattan, Inc. November 1986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York magazine, July 20, 1992,  with Tina Brown as Tilley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s 75th anniversary issue, February 21, 2000, with a William Wegman dog as Tilley (and one of his dogs standing in for the butterfly)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Eustace Tillarobama” (credited to Rea Irvin and Seth) February 11, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And that brings us to the March 6, 2017  The New Yorker, with Barry Blitt’s  “Eustace Vladimirovich Tilley” and Donald J. Trump as the butterfly

Image result for eustace tilley putin

 

Rea Irvin’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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…From the New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, February 25, 2017, “Looking At The Field” Roger Angell on James Stevenson’s art and writing.

photo: Mr. Stevenson in Westport, Connecticut in 2015

 

 

 

 

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Oscar Time!

…Liza Donnelly has been out in Hollywood all week drawing  the scene as the Academy Awards prepares for its big night. Following her historic appearance last year as the first ever cartoonist live drawing on the Red Carpet, she will be back again tomorrow night drawing the stars and the hooplah.

Check out her drawings @lizadonnelly  and  @CBSThisMorning

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The New Yorker’s  Oscar cover, February 27, 2017 by Eric Drooker (titled “#OscarsNotSoWhite”)

 

 

 

 

 

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…I’ll wrap up this post appropriately enough with Bob Eckstein’s Eustace holding an Oscar. Be sure to follow Mr. Ecksteins coverage of the big event on newyorker.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoonist David Sipress on Staying Sane in Trumpland; Attempted Bloggery Looks at Tomato Juice Ads by Thurber, Arno, Steig, Hoff, and Soglow; Cartoon Companion Rates the New Yorker’s Latest Cartoons; Preview: New Yorker’s 92nd Anniversary Issue Cover

 

Post of Interest:  David Sipress’s  Cultural Comment on newyorker.com, February 3, 2017 “How To Stay Sane As A Cartoonist in Trumpland”

See Mr. Sipress’s New Yorker work here on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

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Attempted Bloggery updates a post looking into Libby Tomato Juice ads featuring some of the all-time great New Yorker cartoonists. See it all here!

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Cartoon Companion has returned with a look at the latest New Yorker cartoons (the February 6 2017 issue).  Read it here.

 

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The New Yorker has posted a preview of its upcoming anniversary issue.  Eustace Tilley fans, who look forward to seeing the magazine’s mascot every mid-February on the cover will have to wait another year (if not longer, judging by the last six years). The post also includes a slide show of the non-classic Eustace covers.

For those keeping track, Rea Irvin‘s  cover has not been on an anniversary issue since 2011.

 

Need more Tilley?  Here’s  “Tilley Over Time”  — a piece of mine that ran on the New Yorker‘s website in 2008.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on Ink Spill‘s   “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z “:

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

 

 

 

Exhibit of Interest: R. Crumb’s Early Work; More Spills with Liza Donnelly, Victoria Roberts, Michael Crawford, and a Piece on newyorker.com’s Videos

zap_1-210x300The Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery will exhibit “R. Crumb: Early Works, 1965 – 1967″ Details here.

Mr. Crumb’s New Yorker debut was a cover for the 1994 anniversary issue.  His cover, titled “Elvis Tilley” marked the first break in the magazine’s sixty-eight year old tradition of running Rea Irvin’s classic Eustace Tilley  on the cover of the anniversary issue. (For more on Tilley’s anniversary appearances go here to a piece I wrote for newyorker.com back in 2008)

Elvis Tilley

 

 

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More Spills Icon Editedhere’s a short video for the blog,  Skillshare featuring Liza Donnelly. A link to a longer interview with her can be found on the site. LD Skillshare

 

 

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Link here to this interview of interest:  “New Yorker Cartoonist Victoria Roberts: Write at Home in San Miguel”

victoria4

 

 

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…Here’s an article from Nieman Lab, “Video is giving The New Yorker a way to reach new readers without turning off existing diehards” (the newyorker.com‘s Cartoon Lounge is briefly mentioned).

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Finally, this short piece from a Hudson Valley (NY) publication, Chronogram, “Parting Shot: Michael Crawford”

parting-shot_img_2607_rev-for-bleed_not-web

The New Yorker’s 91st Anniversary Issue

NYer ann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the newsstands this week and next (because it’s a double issue): The New Yorker Anniversary issue (yes, it’s called that on the Table of Contents).

 

Eustace Tilley, as you can see by the cover, has returned, albeit not Rea Irvin’s original.

 

Small ChangeS Noted:

At the bottom of the Table of Contents, the typeface used for the Drawings (meaning cartoons) has returned to this font…

font back

 

…after a brief flirtation with the font below  as part of the magazine’s re-design of certain sections (Goings On About Town, etc.):

font

 

ALSO: Was happy to see the (refined*) Rea Irvin typeface has returned to the following headings: Goings On About Town, Classical Music, Art, Night Life, Movies, The Theatre, and Above & Beyond.  (oddly, Food & Drink is still hanging in there with interlocking “oo”s — a use that goes back to the version of the font in the earliest issues).

*refined meaning that the Irvin typeface was once less perfect along its edges than it is today.  Examples:old Irvin

old

&

new

Irvin new

The New Yorker Celebrates its 90th

Eustace Tilley's Fanned Out.

Over on The New Yorker’s website there is much to dig into: cartoon slide shows from various decades, selected classic pieces, covers.   Go here to see what’s going on.

 

Note: Alas, Rea Irvin’s classic cover of the magazine’s mascot does not appear this week. Nine contemporary takes on Tilley appear instead. I took the above photo to accompany my essay “Tilley Over Time” on the magazine’s website, August of 2008.

Eustace Tilley Bids Adieu, Again

Eustace 2Eustace Tilley (via Bruce McCall) bids adieu to Times Square on the cover of this week’s New Yorker.  The magazine begins work in its new headquarters at 1 World Trade this week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker’s top-hatted mascot bid goodbye once before, back in August of 1937, when Otto Soglow gave us Tilley, not in a Cadillac, but in the back of a  Victoria, and embarking from The Plaza Hotel, not Times Square.   Back then,  Tilley was substituting for E.B. White, who had decided on taking a leave of absence from New York & The New Yorker.  The drawing appeared at the bottom of White’s farewell Talk of The Town piece.  A tearful Thurber dog follows close by the rear wheel. Eustace tips his hat to two waving women in black, holding muffs: Peter Arno’s Whoops Sisters.

 

White's goodbye