Books of Interest: The New Yorker Bon Appetit!, Thurber’s Favole Per Il Nostro Tempo, Steinberg’s Passaporto and The New Yorker Book of Katzen Cartoons

I occasionally travel the world without leaving my desk.  In this case a search of New Yorker cartoons on France’s Amazon site turned up this curiosity. Lookin’ sharp, Eustace!

There are plenty of variations on standard New Yorker cartoon collections (many with different covers designs). I wondered what a Thurber  title would look like in Italian and found  Thurber’s Fables For Our Time.

Sometimes, it’s just the translated title that catches my eye, such as the German cover for The New Yorker Book of Cat Cartoons. (hey, who doesn’t like katzen?).

A later edition (in Italian) of Steinberg’s Passport with an eye-catching cover: Passaporto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book of Interest: Friedman’s Chosen People; A Searle Reject; A Tilley Paperweight

Book of Interest: Friedman’s Chosen People

Due in the Fall from Fantagraphics: a new collection from New Yorker cover artist, Drew Friedman.  From the publisher: Featuring over 100 of Drew Friedman’s hyper-realistic portraits of the greats, the near-greats, and the not-so-greats, created over the past decade. Artists, cartoonists, comedians, musicians, actors, politicians, the famous and the infamous, these chosen people are just that: People chosen to be rendered by the man Boing Boing calls “The greatest living portrait artist.” 

More book info here.      And here’s the link for Mr. Friedman’s website.

_________________________________________________________________________________

A Rejected Searle Cover

Attempted Bloggery has a really nice post about this beautiful rejected New Yorker cover by Ronald Searle. To see the full cover and so much more, go here.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________

A Tilley Paperweight

Finally, here’s one of my favorite objets d’Tilley: a paperweight sold some years back (still around on various online sites, including Etsy). For the completist, there’s another Tilley-related paperweight available: Eustacia Tilley, R. O. Blechman’s take on Rea Irvin’s creation for the New Yorker‘s inaugural issue. Eustacia was the cover for the magazine’s “Women’s Issue” way back in 1996.

 

A Small Treasure From the Jack Ziegler Memorial; Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview, Pt.2; Looking For Eustace

A Small Treasure From The Jack Ziegler Memorial

Here are a few pages from the fine 10 page pamphlet that was available last Saturday at the memorial for Jack Ziegler. The pamphlet contains a  lovely unpublished cover (seen below) as well as a two-page  “killed” New Yorker spread (not shown) and a number of photographs of Mr. Ziegler, as well as a list of his collected work (shown below). 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion’s Harry Bliss Interview Pt. 2

If you enjoyed Part 1 of the Bliss interview, no doubt you’ll want to read Pt.2…  Read Mr. Bliss’s interview here.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Looking For Eustace

Here’s something I’ve done maybe just once before: ask Ink Spill visitors if anyone out there has something I’ve looked for for years but have yet to find. This time it’s the miniature (about 3 1/2 inches high, I believe) Eustace Tilley pictured here.  There were 500 manufactured by Sebastian Miniatures back in 1949 (apparently there’s a newer version, from 1981, with a black base.  Only 6 of those were made).  For me, this 1949 Tilley has become the Holy Grail of New Yorker “stuff” (the little bit of information I found about it comes from a book, The Sebastian Miniature Collection by Dr. Glenn Johnson).

If anyone out there has one and would be willing to trade for a couple of my New Yorker original drawings, please contact me.

John Donohue on Drawing Disappearing Eateries; Julia Wertz is Pencilled; The Tilley Watch: The New New Yorker Masthead

From  newyorker.com, May 23, 2017, ““Drawing the Vanishing Restaurants of New York” — this post by John Donohue, who has been tirelessly attempting to draw all the restaurants in New York.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________

Next up on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils blog is Julia Wertz, whose new book, Tenements, Towers & Trash: An Unconventional, Illustrated History of New York City will be out this coming October. 

A bunch of links to Ms. Wertz’s work, New Yorker and otherwise can be found on the Pencils post.

__________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

…Stephen Nadler, who runs Attempted Bloggery, one of my fave New Yorker-related sites, notified me last night that someone had been busy monkeying around with Rea Irvin’s  iconic New Yorker masthead. Now’s a good time to take a look at how the masthead has changed (and when it changed) in the magazine’s 92 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is how it looked in the very first issue, February 21, 1925, with Of All Things beneath Rea Irvin’s design. The Talk of The Town was elsewhere in the issue, but would soon find a better fit…

 

 

 

 

 

…in the next issue, in fact: February 28, 1925 (above). The above masthead stuck around only half-a-year…

 

 

 

 

 

…until the issue of August 22 1925 (above), when it was obviously redrawn; the typeface changed too. 

 

 

 

 

 

In January 30, 1926 a cleaner, un-boxed masthead appeared, and again redrawn. This is the masthead most of us have known our entire lives.  It has stayed like this, unchanged, excepting the disappearance of the tiny little white dots on Eustace Tilley’s shoulder — they faded away somewhere in time.  A modern addition was a designery horizontal thin line above it in the anniversary issue of February 21, 2000. 

 

 

 

 

 

This brings us up to date. The above redesign first appeared in the issue of May 22, 2017.  Mr. Irvin’s charmingly imperfect scroll-like line has met a white-out brush.  His owl has been re-drawn, his buildings re-drawn too (with the inclusion of One World Trade Center in this new assortment).  Tilley himself has changed just a bit, from the neck up.  The designery horizontal line from 2000 remains (why toss out a perfectly good clean straight line?).  

A fond farewell to Mr. Irvin’s brilliant diamond.  Perhaps we’ll meet again?  

More Tilley: here’s a piece I wrote for newyorker.com back in 2008, “Tilley Over Time”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Von Riegen, and Some Corey Ford

 

 

 

It’s good to see those anonymous critics, Max and Simon, are staying the course and digging into the cartoons appearing in each and every new issue of The New Yorker. This week they look at (and rate) cartoons featuring, among other things, a snail, a yodeler, a proud woodsman, subway rats, and some gangsters wearing matching pants and shirts. 

____________________________________________________________

And swinging back over to Attempted Bloggery, the William Von Riegen material keeps on-comin. I like that this book jacket cover featuring Mr. Von Riegen’s art was featured.  One of the book’s co-authors is Corey Ford, who will be no stranger to New Yorker history buffs (he gave name to Eustace Tilley).  Here’s the very rare book containing the Making of a Magazine pieces Mr. Ford contributed to the New Yorker in its infancy (this is a screen grab — the book is, alas, not in the Spill’s library, although a promotional booklet of the material, donated by a generous collector, is).  

You can read Mr. Ford’s pieces here

Charlie Hankin Speaks; Christoph Niemann Profiled on Netflix’s “Abstract”; Eustace Tilley’s Non-Anniversary Cover Appearances

 

 

This piece on  Charlie Hankin, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2013:  “Catching Up with New Yorker cartoonist and Park School grad Charlie Hankin” (The Baltimore Sun, March 4, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link here to Mr. Hankin’s website.

 

________________________________________________________________________________

 

Christoph Niemann, who’s contributed nearly two dozen covers to The New Yorker (and plenty of illustrations) is the subject of episode #1 in the Netflix series “Abstract”–  here’s a link to the Netflix site (where Netflix  offers a free trial…I’m not promoting Netflix, just offering the information).  — My thanks to New Yorker cover aritst, John Cuneo for bringing this series to my attention.

Link here to Mr. Niemann’s website where you can see an abundance of his work.

 

 

 

 

____________________________________________________________________

There’s been a lot of Eustace Tilley talk on Ink Spill lately — below is Mr. Niemann’s take on Rea Irvin’s masterpiece. Titled “Icon” it appeared on The New Yorker, May 27 2002. It was a rare non-anniversary Tilley inspired cover appearance. I can only think of three other such occasions. They appear below Mr. Niemann’s cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

____________________________________________________________________________

More non-anniversary Tilley-inspired cover appearances: Barry Blitt in 1999, Bob Zoell in 2002, and Ana Juan in 2005