The Monday Tilley Watch (Part 1)

Double issues (as we’ve just experienced) have a way of creating the impression it’s been ages since the last new issue. So, yay, finally: the late August New Yorker (dated, for the record:  August 21, 2017). There are a lot of cartoons in this issue, so the Monday Tilley Watch will be broken up into two parts. I’ll post the second half in a few days…possibly tomorrow (a Tuesday Tilley Watch?)

The cover, by Adrian Tomine, is certainly summery (and a sort of summary of some summers). 

Skipping through the front of the magazine (this is, after all, a look at the drawings in the issue) I pause to note that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of the Town masthead is still on holiday (wishful thinking that it might’ve returned!).  Now on to the cartoons:

The first, Mr. Tator Tot, is descended from the world of Mr. Potato Head and is pure Danny Shanahan.  I can see these being sold in nice little packages wherever toys are sold (with a warning that they should be kept out of the hands of small children).  As a side note, when Mr. Shanahan was discussing this drawing with me not long ago we went off into a brief recounting of the various potato-related drawings we’d both done.  Someone should do a New Yorker book of potato cartoons.  The next drawing (I’ll shorthand it as “hip disease”)  is by Jason Adam Katzenstein, who is closing in on his third anniversary of appearing in The New Yorker. I’m a big fan of doctor office drawings. The eye chart in this one really caught my…eye (sorry). I’d say someone should do a book of New Yorker doctor cartoons, but it’s been done, and done well. 

A few pages later we come to a summertime baseball in the park drawing by yours truly. For those who keep track of things, this is my second major appliance-related drawing in the magazine (there was at least one cartoon of mine featuring a small appliance (a blender) back in the 1980s).  Seven pages later we come to a Tom Toro desert island drawing (Mr. Toro was profiled here on the Spill not long ago, talking about his new book Tiny Hands, among other things). The desert island fellow, judging by his look, has somehow managed to survive on the island for a very long time. Good for you, island guy. I’m a little worried about the cruise ship being so close to shore, but then remind myself that this is a cartoon. (fyi: Mr. Toro’s been contributing to The New Yorker since 2010).  Next up is a drawing by newish-comer, Kate Curtis (she’s been contributing to the magazine for about a year-and-a-half).  I love set piece cartoons (folks sitting at a dining room table or a kitchen table, people in bed or sitting on living room sofas, etc.). Challenging, and so much fun when they work out well, as this one has. Several pages later is another newcomer, Maddie Dai (Her first New Yorker cartoon appeared this past June).  A hopscotch drawing! We don’t see many of those.  This one has a Charles Addams-ish flavor to it.  And speaking of Mr. Addams, who did a number of wonderful gingerbread house drawings in his time, our next drawing, by Liana Finck, is of a house made of kale.  Worth noting here: as has been the case for at least the past five issues of the magazine, the placement and sizing of most drawings has been splendid. (Ms. Finck’s first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker, February 2013). The next drawing, by Sara Lautman (first cartoon in The New Yorker: March, 2016) is a blast of color…and madras (!) — making for an exciting visual. A few pages later, and again, well-placed and sized, is an Ed Steed cartoon. Love the child-like house on the horizon. Mr. Steed’s first appearance in the magazine: March 2013. There’s a Sketchbook by Will McPhail a few pages following Mr. Steed’s drawing.  The use of the Sketchbook — and I could be very wrong — goes back to the Tina Brown era. Next up is a drawing by Emily Flake (like Mr. Toro, she was the subject of a piece on The Spill not long ago). Ms. Flake has been contributing to the magazine since September of 2008. This is a set piece drawing, with a lot of emotion.

Part 2 of The Monday Tilley Watch coming later this week…

Flake’s “Mama Tried” on IFC’s 2018 Slate of Projects; Books of Interest: Seth, Ben Katchor; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 7: Charles Saxon

Flake’s “Mama Tried” on IFC ‘s 2018 Slate of Projects

From Deadline Hollywood, July 29, 2017, “IFC Sets 2018 Slate…” — in a list of projects following this sentence:

IFC has given episodic script orders to the following projects:

is:

Mama Tried
A show about the seamy underbelly of new motherhood, Mama Triedfollows the struggles (and occasional triumphs) of Liz Callahan who’s finding that she could care less about being a “super-mom”- she just wants to survive. Mama Tried weaves Emily Flake’s darkly funny animation to help bring to life all of motherhood’s graphic, and sometimes gruesome, realness. Written by Emily Wilson (Cougar Town, Superior Donuts) and animated by and based on the graphic novel by Emily Flake, executive produced by Jax Media (Full Frontal, Broad City, Search Party).

Ms. Flake was a recent subject of the Spill’s “Checking In With…” series.  Read it here.

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Books of Interest: Seth, Ben Katchor

Never too early to think about upcoming books.  Both of these are University Press of Mississippi titles. Forging the Past: Seth and the Art of Memory –  (the paperback edition; the hardcover was published in 2016) — this edition comes out in December. Seth has been a New Yorker contributor since 2002. 

Ben Katchor: Conversations due in February of 2018. Mr. Katchor began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.

Link here to Seth’s Wikipedia entry.

Link here to Mr. Katchor’s website.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 7: Charles Saxon

A June 8, 1980 New York Times article, “The New Yorker’s Humor Merchants” lead off with this: Charles Saxon, a cartoonist for The New Yorker for the last 25 years, has a problem. So many companies have been buying his drawings for their ads that last year he was able to do only 15 cartoons for the magazine, half his usual total. “I was just swamped with ad assignments and my New Yorker work suffered,” he said.  “This year, I’m setting aside more time for the magazine which I consider my home home and where I can really express myself.”

It is true that, back then, ads using Saxon drawings seemed to be everywhere.  Here’s the very tip of the iceberg, courtesy of SPX’s Executive Director, Warren Bernard, who spent a  great deal of time and effort collecting ads featuring New Yorker cartoonists (and then allowed Ink Spill to reap the rewards).  Dates for ads: Polaroid, 1969; Chivas Regal,1981; Jacuzzi, 1979; IBM, 1963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Mr. Saxon’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Saxon (self portrait above left from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

Interview of Interest: Frank Cotham; Karasik Talks “Nancy”; Shannon Wheeler at SPX; The Tilley Watch: A Flake Follow-Up & Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cartoon Companion has posted Part 1 of an interview with long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Frank CothamRead it here.  Above: one of Mr. Cotham’s porch drawings published in the New Yorker,.  April 1, 2013 (click on it to enlarge).

Note: For more Cotham, you might enjoy this Spill interview from 2013

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Karasik Talks “Nancy”

Paul Karasik and his co-author Mark Newgarden will be at The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium this Fall discussing their forthcoming How To Read Nancy.  Details here.

 

 

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Shannon Wheeler at SPX

Too Much Coffee Man himself, Shannon Wheeler will appear at the upcoming Small Press Expo this Fall. Details here.

 

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A Tilley Watch Follow-Up to “Checking In With: Emily Flake”

…For a Cartoon Lounge segment, released today featuring Emily Flake  at the New Yorker‘s offices with the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, go here.

 

The New Yorker has rush released next week’s cover (by Barry Blitt):

 

 

 

 

 

 

Checking In: The Spill Talks Pies and Target Practice With Emily Flake

Checking In With Emily Flake

You never know what you’ll learn when you go (virtually) knocking on a cartoonist’s door. As part of the Spill’s “Checking In With…” series I asked my colleague, Emily Flake, whose ninth anniversary as a New Yorker cartoonist is in September, what she’s been up to lately, and she replied: 

“As always, plugging away at gag cartoons and longer stuff to pitch to The New Yorker. I have a bi-weekly slot with The Nib, so there’s that! I suspended operations on Lulu Eightball about a year ago – I was in the throes of a writing job that was fun and lucrative but took up a lot of time, and something had to give; I’d been doing Lulu since 2001 and figured it was time to step back. I’ve just learned that the paper where Lulu got its start, the Baltimore City Paper, is shutting down, so I’ve been in a bit of a funk over that.

In general I also do illustration work; writing this out reminds me that I’m overdue on some sketches for a project about the process of dying (a laff a minute!). I have a 4 year old, and those things are remarkably time-consuming. I also spend a lot of time falling down internet rabbit holes and mucking around in a swamp of self-doubt and loathing. I did however just get a sulus-vide device for my birthday, so there’s that! Also I make pies.”

Michael Maslin: I’m almost afraid to ask — but what’s a “sulus-vide device” (I could look it up but then I might end up falling into that very same internet rabbit hole).

Emily Flake: Whoa, sorry! I mis-typed “sous-vide” – it’s a thing that creates a hot water bath so you can cook things in it. It’s supposed to be amazing. I will keep you posted on the results as soon as I have any.

Left: A sous vide. Thanks to Emily, I just learned something.

MM:Your “process of dying” project sounds fascinating, especially as your book, Mama Tried  was about the beginning years of the life cycle.  Many cartoonists tend to visit and revisit death on a regular basis (in their work). Do you as well?

EF: Well, the dying project is something I’m doing for someone else – it’s not necessarily *my* thoughts on dying. I’ve done some “death personified” gags for the magazine, because who hasn’t; I think about death almost every day. Not in a particularly morbid way, just in terms of what the eventual end of a thing means for the thing itself. It all became unbearably precious to me once I had a kid (not that you have to have a kid to feel that life is precious, but for me it really raised the stakes). 
left: a drawing by Ms. Flake published in The New Yorker, November 1, 2011
 
MM:  Congrats on joining the Full Page club in the New Yorker  Was that your first?   Are you thinking “full page” when you submit? 
 
EF: Thanks! It was indeed my first full-page, and I liked that feeling. I’ve submitted full-pagers before; I like having a bit more room to explore a thing, and I’ve always enjoyed being able to riff on a joke – I’ve published a few 3 or 4 beat gags, which is my preferred method of joke-crafting.
 
MM: Are you going into the New Yorker’s offices on a regular basis?
 
EF: I am extraordinarily lazy and prefer not to leave a six-block radius if I can avoid it. For what do we have an internet if not to facilitate that kind of sloth? Emma’s [Emma Allen, the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] not really doing the sit-down immediate review of batches and prefers to get them digitally, so that saves me wearing pants. 
 

MM: You mentioned you make pies. What kind of pies?

EF: You name it. I recently made a blueberry galette that was an absolute knockout. Now that it’s summer, peach pies, berry pies, etc; I also made a caramelized onion galette (the lazy man’s pie!) recently that turned out great. I made a pistachio cream pie a couple summers ago that I think I’ll revisit – cream/pudding pies are great for this kind of weather. I also recently came across a recipe for tahini brownies that I can’t wait to try – I used tahini in chocolate chip cookies recently and holy shit. I’m not much of an innovator in baking – I follow recipes – but I do love to do it.

MM: Pistachio cream! Wowzers. Do you happen to have a photo of a Flake pie?

EF: [I’m sending you photographs of] a bunch of baked goods and also a paper target, because as I was looking through my photos I remembered that I also like to go to the Westside  Range and shoot off a few rounds.

MM: What are you usually shooting at the range: pistols or rifles?

EF: I’ve only shot rifles at the range – you need a serious permit to shoot pistols in NYC (which I think is a good thing! I like to shoot, but I am all for gun control).

MM: Have you been shooting guns a long time, or is this something new?
 
EF: The first time I ever shot was at a friend’s home range upstate, and I shot pistols there; despite an almost incapacitating hangover, I found I had a knack for it (or possibly just beginner’s luck). Last year I went and took a class at the Westside Range, and then I joined as a member so I can shoot whenever I want. I am only slightly embarrassed to tell you that my interest in shooting was rekindled mainly by a mixture of the current ghostly political climate and, um, watching too much Walking Dead.

Below: An array of some of Ms. Flake’s pies. One of her paper targets, along with a slice of one of her pies, appears at the top of this post

 

 

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A Note to Ink Spill Visitors

Keen-eyed visitors may notice the first ever appearance of an advertisement on this site.  I’ve resisted advertising these past ten years, but have made an exception for The American Bystander as it’s such a welcome addition to the landscape. 

Resist! #2 Arrives July 4th With An Abundance of New Yorker Contributors

 

The second issue of Resist!, a free “political comics zine of mostly female artists” (a “Man Cave” section is included) edited by Nadja Spiegelman and The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, will be distributed this coming July 4th in comic book stores and out on the streets by volunteers (approximately 60,000 copies of the first Resist! were distributed this past January).

Go here to find out where you can find a copy near you

According to a press release “the free distribution of Resist! is intended as an Independence Day celebration of the First Amendment, of our diverse country and of our resilience.”

The Editors write in the introductory pages of #2: “These pages contain many individual realities.  They reflect topics as diverse as their contributors: the environment, immigration, racism and the economy.”

Artists represented in this 96 page anthology are from all over the world, but as the Spill’s focus is  primarily New Yorker contributors, I’m  listing the artists whose work has been published there.  In order of appearance:  Roz Chast, Kendra Allenby, Carol Lay, Ana Juan, Anita Kunz, Emily Flake, Amy Kurzweil, Kim Warp, Abigail Gray Swartz, Andrea Arroyo, Liniers, John Cuneo, Tom Toro, Peter Kuper,  Frank Viva, Paul Karasik, Art Spiegelman, R. Sikoryak, Dean Rohrer, Shannon Wheeler, and Daniel Clowes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, link here to the Resist! website.

Credits:

Resist! #2 cover by Malika Fravre, a French artist living in London, England.

Across the Great Red States by Kendra Allenby, a cartoonist and storyboard artist living in Brooklyn, NY.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker

“We’re looking for something that says ‘Death to the Patriarchy’…” by Amy Kurzweil, author of Flying Couches: A Graphic Memoir.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker.

All art copyrighted by the respective artists.

 

Wall-to-Wall Cartoonists at David Remnick’s Hello Goodbye Party

 The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick threw a Hello Goodbye party last night (Hello, Emma Allen, the magazine’s new cartoon editor; Goodbye, Bob Mankoff, the former cartoon editor). It was, by far, the largest gathering of New Yorker cartoonists since  1997, when forty-one gathered for an Arnold Newman group photo (it appeared in the magazine’s first cartoon issue, December 15, 1997). Here are a bunch of photos from the evening, courtesy of Liza Donnelly, the Spill‘s official photographer for the evening; additional  photos by  Sarah Booth, Marshall Hopkins, and Paul Karasik.

Photo above, l-r: Drew Dernavich, Sarah Booth, John Klossner, George Booth, Chad Darbyshire (back to camera), Matt Diffee, (New Yorker writer) Sarah Larson, Ken Krimstein, Bob Mankoff, Eric Lewis, Bob Eckstein

Edward Koren and Francoise Mouly (The New Yorker‘s Art Editor)

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor, and Stanley Ledbetter, the magazine’s jack-of-all trades.

 

 

 

 

 

George Booth and Roz Chast.  That’s Lars Kenseth in the background (photo courtesy of Sarah Booth)

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Karasik, Liana Finck and Gabrielle Bell (photo courtesy of Paul Karasik)

 

 

 

 

Jason Adam Katzenstein, unidentified, Roz Chast speaking with Sara Lautman (back to camera), and Chris Weyant far right.

 

 

 

Chris Weyant (partially obscured), Farley Katz, unidentified, David Sipress, New Yorker writer Matt Dellinger (in checked shirt), Andy Friedman, Danny Shanahan. The group in the back: Drew Panckeri, Mitra Farmand, Sara Lautman, Kendra Allenby

 

Sam Gross and Robert Leighton

 

Bob Mankoff and David Remnick

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Cater, with the New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes, and Avi Steinberg

 

 

 

George Booth and David Borchart

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Dator and Peter Kuper

 

 

Felipe Galindo and Carolita Johnson

 

 

 

John O’Brien and Bob Eckstein

 

 

Three former cartoon department assistants: Marshall Hopkins, Emily Votruba, and Andy Friedman (photo courtesy of Marshall Hopkins)

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Weyant and Paul Noth

 

 

Matt Dellinger with  Stanley Ledbetter, and Matt Diffee (and way back by the window: Chad Darbyshire to the left, and Amy Hwang to the right)

 

 

 

 

P.C. Vey and Trevor Hoey

 

 

 

 

 

Kim Warp, Pat Byrnes, and George Booth

 

 

 

Sam Gross and Roz Chast

 

 

 

 

l-r: P.C. Vey, Liza Donnelly, Danny Shanahan, George Booth, and Michael Maslin (photo courtesy of Sarah Booth)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Weyant and Liana Finck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Gross and Lars Kenseth

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Lewis, Andy Friedman, and Barbara Smaller

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Byrnes, Paul Karasik, and Peter Kuper

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marc Philippe Eskenazi and Ben Schwartz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie Hankin, Amy Hwang, Kendra Allenby, and Avi Steinberg

 

 

 

Marshall Hopkins with Bob Mankoff’s first assistant, Emily Votruba (Mr. Hopkins was also at one time Mr. Mankoff’s assistant)

 

 

 

Far left: David Sipress speaks with Andy Friedman.  Foreground: Barbara Smaller, Emily Flake and P.C. Vey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

l-r: Felipe Galindo, Marshall Hopkins, Sam Gross, Mort Gerberg, and Ed Koren

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Koren, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly and a photobombing David Remnick. That’s Charlie Hankin in the back, far right.

 

 

 

 

Here’s an  incomplete list of all the cartoonists who were there (if you were there and don’t appear on this list, please let me know)

Kendra Allenby, George Booth, David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, Chris Cater, Roz Chast, Joe Dator, Chad Darbyshire, Drew Dernavich, Matt Diffee, Liza Donnelly, Bob Eckstein, Mitra Farmand, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat), Felipe Galindo(aka feggo), Mort Gerberg,  Sam Gross, Charlie Hankin, Marshall Hopkins, Amy Hwang, Edward Koren, Trevor Hoey, Carolita Johnson, Paul Karasik, Farley Katz, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Lars Kenseth,  John Klossner, Ken Krimstein, Peter Kuper, Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman, Robert Leighton, Eric Lewis, Bob Mankoff, Sam Marlow, Michael Maslin,  Paul Noth,  Jeremy Nguyen, John O’Brien, Drew Panckeri, Corey Pandolph, Ellis Rosen, Jennifer Saura, Ben Schwartz, Danny Shanahan, David Sipress,  Avi Steinberg, P.C. Vey, Kim Warp, Chris Weyant.