Spiegelman on Maus & Post-Maus; Cartoonists & Cookbooks

From Kentwired.com, March 7, 2018, “Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Art Spiegelman Discusses Politics and Identity”Maus and more from the celebrated cartoonist who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1992.

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Cartoonists & Cookbooks

The Cartoonist Cookbook popped up on an online search yesterday.  Published in 1966 by Hobbs, Dorman & Co., it includes 45 favorite recipes by strip cartoonists. I was only able to find a partial list of contributors.*  Here’s a short post about the book.

 

I’m certain that that’s a Virgil Partch drawing in the first column, five squares down on the front cover. Here’s his Spill A-Z entry:

Virgil Partch ( VIP) (pictured above) Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. NYer work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

Also showing up online was this Charles Addams cookbook that I somehow missed over the past few years (Simon & Schuster, 2005):

The only thing close to either of these in the Spill‘s library is the below desserts cookbook featuring a Peter Arno cover (but, alas, no recipes by Arno, who liked to cook).

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*Thanks to the cartoonist, Eli Stein, we now have the entire list of contributors to the Cartoonist Cook Book.  My thanks to Mr. Stein for forwarding. 

 

Video: Paul Noth; Eli Stein celebrates Al Ross’s 100th; New Book: a Wolcott Gibbs anthology

From a blog by Peter McGraw, October 26, 2011, “Will these cartoons be funny in other countries?” – this post, including a short video of an interview with Paul Noth

 

From Eli Stein’s website, “We All Have to Start Somewhere Dept. Case in Point #16,” this post featuring work by Al Ross

 

From Salon, October 21, 2001, “The New Yorker writer that time forgot,” this review of a Wolcott Gibbs anthology, Backward Ran Sentences

[ in the earliest days of The New Yorker, Gibbs, as Katharine White’s assistant, was  given the sometimes unenviable task of hand holder, which meant talking to the artists, sending them notes, handing them rejections, etc..

Charles Addams fans might remember that Addams illustrated several book jackets for Gibbs, including Season in the Sun (Random House, 1951) and More in Sorrow (Holt, 1958) ]