The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 18, 1984

As mentioned here last week, it’s double issue time again. We’re halfway though it now ; only a week til the new issue (dated June 18, 2018) appears online early Monday morning. Just for fun I thought I’d go back to another June 18th issue — the one from 1984. 

Here’s the cover, by Susan Davis, who contributed fifteen covers to the magazine from 1983 – 1992.

 

And here are the cartoonists in that issue:

A number of New Yorker cartoon gods in that lineup. And, as you might expect, some cartoonists  contributing to the magazine then who still contribute now. On the downside, a number of colleagues who’ve passed on: George Price, James Stevenson, William Steig, Stan Hunt, J. B. Handelsman, Steinberg, Bernie Schoenbaum, Frank Modell, Barney Tobey, Ed Arno, Mischa Richter, Ed Fisher, Eldon Dedini, and Robert Weber.

A quick tour through the issue: Ed Frascino has a very funny cartoon name-checking Indiana Jones; Lee Lorenz ( the art editor at the time) puts the word “glitz” to excellent use; a half page George Price cartoon centered on the Year of the Rat; a beautiful full page Saxon drawing about the Museum of Modern Art; a four part Stevenson spread across two pages. He animates television antenna; a titled Steig: “Eastbound Traffic.” Great drawing!;  Stan Hunt’s drawing is one of those cartoons that could’ve run anytime in the previous thirty years (previous to 1984, that is) — a boiler plate kind of cartoon; “Bud” Handelsman gives us a heaven-based piece; a Roz Chast drawing split into four boxes. It could’ve run this year; an Ed Koren drawing that just is so like butter — drawing and caption;  Steinberg provides an illustration for a Profile piece by E.J. Kahn, Jr.; opposite Steinberg is a Bernie Schoenbaum cocktail party drawing — a scenario employed by nearly every cartoonist back then; a Frank Modell drawing with his signature people — love his grumpy husband; an Arnie Levin caterpillar/butterfly drawing — that that loose Levin line is so great; a Barney Tobey drawing set in another favorite situation: the boardroom; a great Warren Miller drawing:

 Following Mr. Miller’s cartoon is an Ed Arno drawing — that fine controlled line of his! Immediately identifiable; a Mischa Richter dog at a desk drawing; Ed Fisher gives us a weather bureau drawing with lots of fun detail; Eldon Dedini’s cartoon of two guys at a bar with a caption that could run today:Everything’s a trap if you’re not careful.”;  next up, a cartoon that made me laugh out loud, by the great cartoonist, Robert Weber:

Next, a beautiful Sempe drawing (is there any other kind?); and last, a Sidney Harris restaurant drawing. Mr. Harris’s style is his and his alone: an angular line that appears to almost spin out of control, but never does.

So, there it is. A cartoon feast in mid-June, thirty-four years ago. 

 

     

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini; The Monday Tilley Watch

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini

Out of the blue, the Monterey Herald posted this fine photo of the late Eldon Dedini under the headline, “Looking Back, Portrait of a Cartoonist”

Here’s Mr. Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. New Yorker work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

And a real treat, mentioned here a long time back: there’s a multi-panel documentary of Mr. Dedini available onYouTubePart 1 here

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The Monday Tilley Watch

The issue of May 14, 2018, The “Innovators Issue”…

Record keeping: here’re the cartoonists in the issue (Liana Finck’s name isn’t below but she is listed on the Table of Contents for a Sketchbook piece titled “Life and Work”).

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead (below) is still in storage.  As the president might say: Sad!

And sorry to bring this up again, but this business of switching from the Irvin typeface on bylines (see below: “By Tad Friend”) strikes me as tweaking something that does not need tweaking. In fact, some newly incorporated design elements need to be un-tweaked. Would you tweak the top of the Empire State Building because you could? I hope not.

 

Below is a heading plucked from the Dec. 3, 2012 issue.  Notice Calvin Trillin’s name set in Irvin type. Now look back up at the byline for Superior Intelligence.  No question which is the superior typeface. 

Ok, back to cartoons, briefly.  If you want a close look at each cartoon in the issue please visit the Cartoon Companion.  They usually post their rated takes for the latest issue at the end of the week. The CC and the Spill are not affiliated, and in fact often disagree on what’s a great cartoon and what’s a dud.  I’ll return to looking closely at cartoons in this space every so often. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A 32 Year Old New Yorker Cartoon Sampler

This being a Monday, the Monday Tilley Watch would normally be here, but last week’s issue was a double — we won’t see a new issue until next Monday.  So here’s an addendum to yesterday’s post (about the magazine’s 60th anniversary album):  A Cartoon Sampler, published in 1985 (wow, what a celebratory mood the magazine was in).  Samplers were not new then, but they have somewhat fizzled out since.  I believe this Sampler would’ve been offered to new subscribers (a lot of, if not most of, other samplers were themed, and sent out as advertising incentives). 

Sitting above an Eldon Dedini drawing on the very first page is this intro:

Almost 50 pages, this isn’t a cheap-o toss-away booklet, but something savable — it tucks nicely into the 1975-1985 Album. The cartoons, all on reasonably good paper stock, are usually placed one a page with just a couple of exceptions.  There’s even a double page spread of Steinberg’s drawings (“Women”).  The cartoonists are represented in a fine balance, from George Price, the elder (in terms of years at the magazine; his first New Yorker appearance was in 1929) to newbie, Richard Cline, who was first published in the New Yorker in 1981.

A sample from the Sampler:  work by Robert Weber (the full page) and on the opposite page, Roz Chast, and Edward Koren:

The back cover:

 

 

Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro; Blog of Interest: New Yorker State of Mind; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons; More Bloggery

Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro

From the blog Smack Dab in the Middle, this interview with Ms. Munro who contributed some spectacular covers to The New Yorker, including the one above.

Link here to her website.

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker

An irresistible site if you love getting in the New Yorker weeds. As you can see the issue in the spotlight this week is dated August 4, 1928.  Cover by Julian de Miskey. Read it here.

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

And now back to the future…the Cartoon Companion boys, “Max” & “Simon” look closely at the brand new cartoons in the brand new issue of The New Yorker. Cartoons with salt, sharks, wax, thuggery, punch, groceries dissected.  Read it here.

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More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons

Thanks to a Facebook post by Mort Gerberg yesterday I was alerted to this brand new book published in late August by Beaufort Books, Playboy Laughs: The Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons of Playboy.  According  to Mr. Gerberg, the book includes interviews with Arnold Roth, Jules Feiffer, Mike Williams, Don Orehek, Al Jaffee and Mr. Gerberg. 

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More Bloggery

Stephen Nadler over at Attempted Bloggery continues providing a look into New Yorker cartoon auction art and ephemera.  Today it’s sheet music from Murray Anderson’s 1929 Almanac (and an Arno Camel ad in the show’s Playbill). Scroll on down the post and you’ll see an auctioned Eldon Dedini original and an incredible horde of originals for a 1937 Macy’s ad campaign by Gregory d’Allesio.  Fascinating stuff all.  See it here

Barbara Shermund on the Cover of…Esquire

When Warren Bernard (of SPX) offered his scanned collection of advertising work by New Yorker cartoonists for use on this site, he included some bonus scans.  Among them were non-advertising work by New Yorker contributors that appeared in Esquire.  Looking through them the other day, Barnbara Shermund’s covers for Esquire popped out on the screen. Here are the four covers Mr. Bernard sent along.  There are a number of Shermund Esquire cartoons in his collection as well — I’ll show those at a later time.  If you want to read a quick capsule history of Ms. Shermund’s career, go here. Of note: Ms. Shermund had eight covers for The New Yorker. Her first was the 17th cover in the magazine’s history. I’ll show it here to give you an idea how her work changed from 1925 to the 1940s.

If you enlarge the covers, you’ll see that cartoonists appearing in each issue are named.  You’ll also notice how many of them are New Yorker contributors (such as Garrett Price, Michael Berry, Frank Beaven, Howard Baer, E. Simms Campbell, Eldon Dedini, and Sam Cobean).  A source (okay, it’s Bob Mankoff, Esquire’s cartoon editor) informed me that Esquire has a complete digital archive of all its cartoons — I’m hoping to get my hands on it one of these days in order to share even more cross-over information. Speaking of Sam Cobean, there was one Cobean Esquire cover included in Mr. Bernard’s collection:

Here’s Barbara Shermund’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z (and Mr. Cobean’s as well):

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. NYer work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/