Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro; Blog of Interest: New Yorker State of Mind; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons; More Bloggery

Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro

From the blog Smack Dab in the Middle, this interview with Ms. Munro who contributed some spectacular covers to The New Yorker, including the one above.

Link here to her website.

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker

An irresistible site if you love getting in the New Yorker weeds. As you can see the issue in the spotlight this week is dated August 4, 1928.  Cover by Julian de Miskey. Read it here.

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

And now back to the future…the Cartoon Companion boys, “Max” & “Simon” look closely at the brand new cartoons in the brand new issue of The New Yorker. Cartoons with salt, sharks, wax, thuggery, punch, groceries dissected.  Read it here.

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More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons

Thanks to a Facebook post by Mort Gerberg yesterday I was alerted to this brand new book published in late August by Beaufort Books, Playboy Laughs: The Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons of Playboy.  According  to Mr. Gerberg, the book includes interviews with Arnold Roth, Jules Feiffer, Mike Williams, Don Orehek, Al Jaffee and Mr. Gerberg. 

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More Bloggery

Stephen Nadler over at Attempted Bloggery continues providing a look into New Yorker cartoon auction art and ephemera.  Today it’s sheet music from Murray Anderson’s 1929 Almanac (and an Arno Camel ad in the show’s Playbill). Scroll on down the post and you’ll see an auctioned Eldon Dedini original and an incredible horde of originals for a 1937 Macy’s ad campaign by Gregory d’Allesio.  Fascinating stuff all.  See it here

Barbara Shermund on the Cover of…Esquire

When Warren Bernard (of SPX) offered his scanned collection of advertising work by New Yorker cartoonists for use on this site, he included some bonus scans.  Among them were non-advertising work by New Yorker contributors that appeared in Esquire.  Looking through them the other day, Barnbara Shermund’s covers for Esquire popped out on the screen. Here are the four covers Mr. Bernard sent along.  There are a number of Shermund Esquire cartoons in his collection as well — I’ll show those at a later time.  If you want to read a quick capsule history of Ms. Shermund’s career, go here. Of note: Ms. Shermund had eight covers for The New Yorker. Her first was the 17th cover in the magazine’s history. I’ll show it here to give you an idea how her work changed from 1925 to the 1940s.

If you enlarge the covers, you’ll see that cartoonists appearing in each issue are named.  You’ll also notice how many of them are New Yorker contributors (such as Garrett Price, Michael Berry, Frank Beaven, Howard Baer, E. Simms Campbell, Eldon Dedini, and Sam Cobean).  A source (okay, it’s Bob Mankoff, Esquire’s cartoon editor) informed me that Esquire has a complete digital archive of all its cartoons — I’m hoping to get my hands on it one of these days in order to share even more cross-over information. Speaking of Sam Cobean, there was one Cobean Esquire cover included in Mr. Bernard’s collection:

Here’s Barbara Shermund’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z (and Mr. Cobean’s as well):

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. NYer work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/

Ohio State’s Dedini Exhibit “The Art of Humor”

 

Dedini Art of Humor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy to note this upcoming exhibit of Eldon Dedini‘s work at Ohio State’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. It runs from February 13 through May 22. Link to the Billy Ireland website.

There will be a screening of Dedini: A Life of Cartoons on February 20th.

From the Museum’s brochure:

Eldon Dedini (1921 – 2006) was a master of the gag cartoon. For almost half a century, both The New Yorker and Playboy regularly published his work, which featured a unique blend of art and humor informed by his insatiable appetite for knowledge and his love of fine art, jazz, wine and life.

 

From Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957)  Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. NYer work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

Regan Arts to Publish Maslin Peter Arno Biography, Mad At Something

 

arno

I’m pleased to announce that  Mad At Something, my biography of the late and very great New Yorker cartoonist, Peter Arno will be published by Regan Arts.

 

Arno is one of the pillars of The New Yorkers earliest days, a group that includes Harold Ross, E.B. White, Katharine White, and James Thurber.  Ross, the magazine’s founder and first editor called Arno “our pathfinder artist”  and “the greatest artist in the world.”  It is indeed the case that Arno’s work for the magazine raised the graphic bar so high that “New Yorker cartoon” became synonymous with excellence in the field.

 
The idea for an Arno biography began back in 1999 in true cartoonist fashion: as an A-Ha! moment as I was driving in the vicinity of Arno’s home just outside of Manhattan; I realized that he had never been the subject of a biography.  Since that moment I’ve spent the past fifteen years researching and writing about his life.

 
Mad At Something is not just an examination of Arno’s life and work, it is also an exploration of the birth and development of the New Yorker cartoon, as well as the magazine’s fabled art department, and its artists. One of the many wonderful things about being a New Yorker cartoonist is the opportunity it’s afforded me to meet other New Yorker cartoonists.  Since beginning the biography I’ve reached out to my colleagues asking them to share their thoughts on Arno’s work. The list includes Arno contemporaries such as William Steig, Syd Hoff, Robert Weber, Frank Modell, Eldon Dedini,  Ed Fisher, through post-Arno contributors such as Jack Ziegler, Roz Chast, Peter Steiner,  Bruce Eric Kaplan and Edward Sorel.  I am especially pleased that the book’s curtain closer is composed of their contributions.

Mad At Something will be published in 2016.

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Happy Birthday, Mr. Arno

Arno

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The late great New Yorker artist, Peter Arno was born 110 years ago today at home in Morningside Heights, New York.  As many regular visitors to Ink Spill know, I began a biography of Mr. Arno back in 1999.   Someday, a publisher willing, Mad At Something: The Life and Times of Peter Arno will be available to all those wishing to know a whole lot more about him.

 

Arno began contributing to The New Yorker in June of 1925 and continued contributing until his death in 1968 (his last cover for the magazine appears above). Over the past fifteen years I’ve asked New Yorker cartoonists to talk to me about Arno.  Today I’ve decided to run a handful of their responses. Some of these cartoonists were contemporaries of Arno’s, and some are in the early phase of their New Yorker cartoonist adventure.

 

 Frank Modell  began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 1946.  I first  interviewed Frank in February of 2000 and then again this past Fall.At 95 he is one of the two New Yorker contributors still with us who actually met Arno (Lillian Ross is the other.  Roger Angell told me he spoke with Arno on the phone, but never actually met him).

Let me tell you something about [Arno] – he was a worrier.  As good as he was, and as strong an artist as he was, surprisingly he was the most worried of all the cartoonists about his drawing.  He would call up [The New Yorker’s Art Department] and say,  ‘Did you get that drawing, the finish I sent in – did you print it yet?’  And I’d say no, then he’d say, ‘Don’t print it!  Tell Geraghty I’m doing another one – I don’t want him to print it until I do another one.’  Then he’d send in another version that didn’t look any different than the first.”

 

 

Syd Hoff, who died in 2004, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1931

“Arno belonged to the great era of Benchley, E.B. White, Perelman, etc., the era of the Great Depression and two emerging classes, upper and lower.  Arno belonged to the upper. Who’ll ever forget his Park Avenue types, on their way to a newsreel theater ‘to hiss Roosevelt’? Those bold drawings!  Nobody could imitate them.  They had to come out of the bourgeoisie!  I remember him standing outside 25 West 43rd Street!  He was big and narrow, just like his men, without [the] handlebar mustaches…”


Robert WeberIf you ask 20 cartoonists to name the top ten cartoonists to come out of the post-Harold Ross years, Robert Weber’s name will surely be on that list.  Mr. Weber’s distinctive bold effortless line is a thing to behold.  Mr. Weber will be 90 this coming April. He began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962.

“I wish I had known or even just met Arno and I regret I didn’t.  I’ve always admired his work, particularly his later work for The New Yorker.  I don’t think I ever consciously tried to emulate him, although I’ve learned a lot from his superb sense of composition and drama.  He had a marvelous ability to simplify.  He never permitted anything extraneous, and he developed a powerful style unlike anyone else.  And, of course, he was funny.  Put me down as a big fan.”

 

Alex Gregory began contributing to The New Yorker in  1999. Besides his work for the magazine he works in television and film. 

 “As far as Arno’s impact on me personally, I grew up looking enviously at his drawings in anthologies.  I would say that Arno is the New Yorker artist that I would most like to have emulated yet had the least capacity to do so.  His cartoons are like black-and-white Matisses. but in some ways even more accomplished. – they capture a person’s mood, character, and breeding with just a few thick supremely confident brush strokes.  The art direction in each panel is flawless; characters are placed perfectly, and the action is always expressive without being broad.   And as rich as each image is, he never gets bogged down in any details that could slow down the joke. His drawings appear to be done by a man who has never known a moment of fear or self-doubt in his life.   I suppose it was Arno more than any other cartoonist save Thurber that made me think of cartooning as an actual art form.”

 


Al Ross, who died in 2012, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1937.

“Arno was special.  He was special like Charles Addams was special, and Price was special.  You know what I mean?”

 

George Booth  began sharing his wonderful world of dogs, cats and characters with The New Yorker’s readership in 1969. 

 “Peter Arno’s work stands out and holds up in the test of time. His drawings and words were never timid, or just clever. They stated high quality, joy, confidence, strength, style, humor, idea, life, simplicity.  His color was right; black and white became color.  His cartoons were researched, with words well applied.  The communication was clear and timely.  He knew what he was doing.  Peter Arno was an artist worthy who gave something of value to the world.  A hero.”

 

 

Eldon Dedini,  who died in 2006, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1950.

“[Arno’s] cartoons were a major inspiration to me.  His staging of a gag was masterful in its simplicity.  No extra crap — the point -bang!  Even today when I have trouble with a drawing I ask myself ‘How would Arno do it?’ and look in collections of his for the answer…Arno is still the model for me and for any thinking cartoonist.”

 

Paul Noth  began contributing to The New Yorker in 2004.  Besides his work for the magazine he has also written for television.

“I was attracted to library books of his when I was a kid because of the sexy ladies (I was raised a strict Catholic, so actual nudity was too much for me, but cartoons like his were somehow okay).

 

Mischa Richter,  who died in 2001, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1950.

“A modern Daumier.”

 

Barbara Smaller began  contributing to The New Yorker in  1996.

  “Arno’s sophisticated bad boy sensibilities never resonated with me in the way a William Steig or George Price’s more plebian ones did.  Still there is much I admire about his drawings, particularly his wonderful deep blacks and dramatic compositions.  I also admit to enjoying the People magazine aspects of his private life;  the high highs and the satisfying low lows.  They are an object lesson to all wayward cartoonists!”

 

Henry Martin began contributing to The New Yorker in 1964

 “… Jim Geraghty bought three ideas from me for Arno in 1964 and 1965.  He was the master, but like so many of the greats the idea wells ran dry, but, lord, how they could create memorable drawings.”

 

Kim Warp began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

Peter Arno wasn’t the reason I became a cartoonist in particular but he was always part of the cartoon collections  that fascinated me as a child…I was impressed by the graphic power of his drawings ( although I wouldn’t have called it that at the time of course) and by the world he portrayed.  In particular I remember the “I’m checking up for the company, Madam.  Have you any of our fuller Brush men.?” Cartoon which somehow melded in my mind with his man in the shower cartoon. This was a much  more interesting world of possibility than  I was being led to believe existed by 1960s TV shows. When I think of him now I’m struck by the grown-up playfulness and joy of life his cartoons portray which contrasts with the work-obsessedness of today.  Maybe it’s just me but I don’t know too many people who have wild cocktail parties after work or fuller brush men hidden in their apartment.  Everyone is at soccer practice with the kids.”

 

 

Edward Sorel began contributing to The New Yorker in 1990.  Mr. Sorel, I believe, is the closest we’ve come to a modern day Arno. 

“It was Arno, not John Held, Jr. who was the true artist of the Jazz Age. Not only was his canvas much larger—including not only the coeds in their yellow slickers, but rich clubmen, gold-diggers, Hollywood illiterates, the unemployed, and most especially, satyrs and other pursuers of sex. And beyond his subject matter, his style of drawing, so spontaneous looking, is much more in keeping with the spirit of the roaring, anything goes, twenties, than Held’s meticulous, carefully designed cartoons. Once the Jazz Age was over, Held seemed antique, whereas Arno’s style not only kept going, but attracted several imitators.”

 

And last, but certainly not least, William Steig.  Mr. Steig, who died in 2003, began his New Yorker career in 1930.

  “I like his work.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday, Mr. Roth

Philip Roth, who celebrates his 80th birthday today, was first published in The New Yorker the issue of March 14, 1959, with his story, “Defender of the Faith” causing an immediate stir (see the upcoming PBS American Masters profile “Philip Roth: Unmasked”  for, among so many other things,  Mr. Roth’s recollection of buying, opening up, reading and rereading his story in this particular issue — jokingly(?) saying he even read it “upside down”).

 

The issue featured a cover by the wonderful Abe Birnbaum, who contributed nine cartoons and nearly a hundred and fifty covers to The New Yorker.  His New York Times obit (June 20, 1966) contains this quote by Mr. Birnbaum: “Nothing is ugly. Everything is what it is.”

 

Brendan Gill reprinted the robin cover in his book,  Here At The New Yorker, writing of it:

 

“Nobody was satisfied with the ‘rough’ of this giant robin as it was first seen at the weekly art meeting. At the time, the background consisted merely of landscape. Geraghty [the New Yorker’s Art Editor from 1939 thru 1973] suggested the addition of birdwatchers. That simple change changed everything.”

 

When Philip Roth read, reread, and read his first New Yorker story upside down, he ran across cartoons by the following cartoonists — a roster that’s just about as good a snapshot of The New Yorker cartoon universe late 1950s as any:

William O’Brian, Frank Modell, Robert Kraus, Saul Steinberg, Everett Opie, Barney Tobey, William Steig, Ed Fisher, Robert Day (whose cartoon appeared on the first page of Roth’s story), James Stevenson, Otto Soglow, Syd Hoff, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Charles Saxon, Anatol Kovarsky, Dana Fradon, Eldon Dedini,  and Lee Lorenz