The New Yorker’s First Father’s Day Cover

I took a moment to look up when Father’s Day began and found it wasn’t officially designated as a nationwide event until 1972 ( footnote: the first Father’s Day was celebrated in Washington state on June 19, 1910).  A quick look through the must-have Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker (Knopf, 1989) led me to the above beauty, dated June 15, 1987, by one of the magazine’s cartoon gods, the great Edward Koren.  Surprising that the magazine took so long to tie-in Dad’s Day with a cover? Yes, and no. It’s entirely possible there’s an earlier non-official Father’s Day New Yorker cover, but the day’s more than half-done and the blank page awaits.

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Personal History: David Sipress & His Father & Baseball

In the spirit of the day here’s a brand new piece on newyorker.com , “My Father and Sandy Koufax” by the cartoonist, David Sipress.

The Tilley Watch Online: May 21- 25, 2018; Edward Sorel’s Rise and Fall of Truman Capote

Mostly Trumpian Daily cartoons this week (as they’ve been for quite some time), with a bonus Daily courtesy of Barry Blitt on Friday. Others contributing through the week: Peter Kuper (twice), Lars Kenseth, David Sipress and Brendan Loper.  

Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists were:  Sophia Warren & Jeremy Nguyen (a team effort, Liana Finck, Jason Adam Katzenstein (with Karen Chee), and Maggie Larson.

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Edward Sorel in The New York Times Book Review

I should’ve mentioned this a while back, but better late than…well you know. Our grand master of caricature, Edward Sorel has been working on a series of back pages for The New York Times Book Review. His latest: “The Rise and Fall of Truman Capote” appears this week.

Mr. Sorel has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1990.

Link to his website here.

 

The Tilley Watch Online, May 14-18, 2018

The Daily Cartoon continues to reside in Trumpland (no surprise!), with an exception for today’s big wedding in jolly ‘ole England. This week’s artists: Ellis Rosen (Royal Wedding), Olivia de Recat (Trump), Jeremy Nguyen (Trumpish), Peter Kuper (Trumpish), David Sipress (Trumpish).

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Liana Finck, Will McPhail, Sara Lautman, and special mention to Colin Stokes, the New Yorker‘s Assistant Cartoon Editor for his piece.

To see all of this work, and more, go here.

The Tilley Watch Online: The Week of April 23 – 27

This week’s Daily cartoons: Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, TV.  

Brought to you by: David Sipress, whose work book-ended the week, first with a Trumpian cartoon on Monday, and on Friday with a Handmaid’s Tale/Westworld themed cartoon; a very very Trumpian cartoon by Peter Kuper, a Trumpish cartoon by Brendan Loper, and a Lars Kenseth Trump/Macron cartoon.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to the Daily Shouts: Jason Adam Katzenstein (with Phil McAndrew), and Barry Blitt.

All of the above and more can be found here.

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of April 16, 2018

Tom Gauld’s cover for this new issue is one of the best covers I’ve seen in the post-Lee Lorenz as editor era (Mr. Lorenz was the New Yorker‘s art editor from 1973 through 1993, and cartoon editor from 1993 through 1997. During his years as art editor he edited both covers and cartoons). Here’s Mr. Gauld talking about his Spring offering. 

Ink Spill puts its hands together for the cover.

My first run through of the issue earlier today made me wonder if this was the Illustration Issue (there isn’t an official Illustration Issue, but if there was, this could be it).  Here’s what I saw:

Goings On About Town, is as usual nearly a full page photograph.

A small color illustration in the Theater section.

A nearly half-page illustration for Night Life.

A three column wide photograph for Food & Drink.

A more than quarter-page photograph for Personal History.

A two column wide illustration for Shouts & Murmurs.

A nearly half-page photograph for The Sporting Scene.

A full page illustration for Profiles.

A page-and-a-half illustration for The World of Fashion.

A full page photograph for Fiction.

A three-quarter page illustration for The Theater.

An large illustration center of the page for Vinson Cunningham’s review in Books.

A more than quarter-page illustration for James Woods review in Books.

A center of the page illustration for Cinema.

And now to the cartoons:

The very first cartoon is by the veteran Mick Stevens. It’s an inside a whale cartoon. I immediately paused to consider the bend in the gullet of the whale. Having never been inside a whale I don’t know what it looks like in there but the cartoonist in me has always thought the inside of a whale was one huge space, like an airplane hanger. So yes, the bend caused me to stop and think awhile.

Up next five pages later is a super-dee-duper detailed William Haefeli drawing. Its graphic-ness (I don’t think that’s really a word) is startling. Perhaps it’s the use of so much black space (windows especially).  

Five pages later a Paul Noth drawing (Mr. Noth has a new book out, so congrats to him). This is an airlines passengers themed cartoon. As someone who has almost never flown I’m outta the loop on the whole boarding routine, so…

Two pages later a Seth Fleishman captionless drawing (as mentioned in previous posts here, Mr. Fleishman is solidly in the captionless cartoon school — which isn’t to say there are never captions). Here we have brick-oven pizza blended with a fossil fuel. I can’t get enough of pizza parlor cartoons. I’m sure everyone remembers this classic from Gahan Wilson.

Six pages later, a P.C. Vey cartoon. Not sure anyone else could’ve done this (maybe the aforementioned Mr. Wilson). There’s a tiny bit of sinisterism (is that a word?) in the air with this drawing. Seven pages later an outta the box (or boxes) Roz Chast drawing. We’ve become accustomed to her comics-like structure of three panels (or more). This single panel is striking, graphically.

Equally striking on the very next page is a teethy Edward Koren drawing starring one of his famous beasts. Perhaps the best placed drawing in the issue (there are several cartoons vying for worst placed cartoons). Breathing room galore for Mr. Koren’s dental drawing.

Four pages later Kate Curtis three bears cartoon (one bear unseen, as is Goldilocks). The window in the drawing looks out onto a dark forest. My gaze kept returning there, expecting to see something. But no…

Three pages later an ashes in an urn drawing from David Sipress. Comedic use of ashes in urns summons up (for me) this scene from Meet the Parents Mr. Sipress makes use of Milton Glaser’s I heart NY campaign, introduced in 1977. 

Two pages later a Ben Schwartz scientists observing behavior cartoon. The cartoon rests on the hope that the reader has some familiarity with a particular author mentioned. If you’re not familiar with the author then it’s off to Wikipedia for a crash course.

Four pages later, Julia Suits has a toga drawing featuring some lovely draping. On the very next page Trevor Spaulding has a cartoon related to a recent cultural movement.  Interesting drawing.

Three pages later a somewhat complex drawing from Lars Kenseth combining fringe mob activity with fine art (see Mickey Blue Eyes for more on this). 

Seven pages later, the last drawing in the issue (not counting those that are part of the caption contest): a Carolita Johnson cartoon in a slim space on the bottom of page 72. The drawing is about lip balm which strangely(?) reminds me of an interview I saw the other day with Joseph Kennedy III wherein he discusses “Chapstick-gate.” 

And that’s that, except for this *

*Rea Irvin’s classic Talk of the Town masthead design has been missing for nearly a year now. Just as a reminder, it looks exactly like this:

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Grossman, Illustrator, Cartoonist Extraordinaire: 1940-2018; The Tilley Watch Online

Robert Grossman, Illustrator, Cartoonist Extraordinaire, 1940 – 2018

  Robert Grossman a multi-talented artist with an instantly recognizable style, has passed away. Mr. Grossman enjoyed a spectacular career as an illustrator and cartoonist with his work appearing on the cover of numerous major publications. For far more information please go to Drew Friedman’s 2013 piece about Mr. Grossman’s career. 

In the early 1960s Mr. Grossman worked briefly as an assistant to the New Yorker‘s Art Editor, James Geraghty. He contributed two cartoons in the Geraghty years: January 13, 1962 (seen above) and December 14, 1963. His work returned to the magazine in the Tina Brown years in the form of six comic strips; his last contribution ran under David Remnick’s editorship.

( Mr. Grossman’s Yale Record parody cover of the New Yorker appears at the top of this piece)

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Trumpian cartoons were in the majority again this week in the Daily Cartoon slot:  a reflection on teachers & guns-in-the-classroom by Avi Steinberg, Stormy weather by Kim Warp, March Madness by Lars Kenseth, a tribute to Stephen Hawking by David Sipress (that was a ‘bonus” Daily), Trump & school walkouts was a team effort by Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley.  The week ended with Ellis Rosen‘s nod to the nationwide closing of the Toys r Us chain. 

Contributing cartoonists appearing on Daily Shouts: Emma Hunsinger, Will McPhail, and Ben Schwartz.

All the work (and more) can be seen here.