“A Very Complicated Thing”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 At the recent event covered here on the Spill (“Wall-To-Wall Cartoonists at David Remnick’s Hello Goodbye Party”) Mr. Remnick said of the New Yorker‘s former cartoon editor, Mr. Mankoff:

“I want to tell you that Bob’s effort to bring not only the work of cartoonists and artists who’ve been around for quite awhile forward, and to put them in their best light, but also to bring new artists into the picture, which is a very complicated thing, has been an enormous boon to the New Yorker…”

 Mr. Remnick’s focus on  the magazine’s cartoonists was notable and welcome.  It struck me while reading the recent news pieces about Mr. Mankoff’s departure as The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor  that all of them focused primarily, and nearly exclusively on Mr. Mankoff himself and his work as a cartoonist, with nary an exploration of exactly what happened with and to the magazine’s cartoonists and cartoon department during the past 20 years during his watch. Of course it makes perfect sense to focus on him — after all, he was the cartoon editor, and his departure was news,  but surely the greater part of his legacy are all those cartoonists that swelled the magazine’s stable these past twenty years.  I’m slightly puzzled as to why several of these news pieces showed us, almost in the form of a greatest hits or a summing up of his career, a good number of Mr. Mankoff’s own cartoons — he’s not retiring as a cartoonist, and in fact has said he will continue to submit work.  My puzzlement is over the absence of discussion of the 128 new cartoonists he brought in to the magazine (Mr. Mankoff mentioned, but only in in passing, 17 of his discoveries in one piece. That only leaves 111 more to talk about).

R.C. Harvey did a long piece that appeared in late March on The Comics Journal site looking at Mr. Mankoff’s editorship.  Selfishly, perhaps, I’m hoping there will be more such pieces looking at how the New Yorker‘s cartoons changed, for better or worse, during these past 20 years; how Mr. Mankoff shaped those changes; and how those changes affected the culture of the New Yorker cartoon department and the cartoonists themselves.  In other words, a critical examination of the Mankoff years. “A very complicated thing” is a thing worth exploring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wall-to-Wall Cartoonists at David Remnick’s Hello Goodbye Party

 The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick threw a Hello Goodbye party last night (Hello, Emma Allen, the magazine’s new cartoon editor; Goodbye, Bob Mankoff, the former cartoon editor). It was, by far, the largest gathering of New Yorker cartoonists since  1997, when forty-one gathered for an Arnold Newman group photo (it appeared in the magazine’s first cartoon issue, December 15, 1997). Here are a bunch of photos from the evening, courtesy of Liza Donnelly, the Spill‘s official photographer for the evening; additional  photos by  Sarah Booth, Marshall Hopkins, and Paul Karasik.

Photo above, l-r: Drew Dernavich, Sarah Booth, John Klossner, George Booth, Chad Darbyshire (back to camera), Matt Diffee, (New Yorker writer) Sarah Larson, Ken Krimstein, Bob Mankoff, Eric Lewis, Bob Eckstein

Edward Koren and Francoise Mouly (The New Yorker‘s Art Editor)

 

 

 

 

 

Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Editor, and Stanley Ledbetter, the magazine’s jack-of-all trades.

 

 

 

 

 

George Booth and Roz Chast.  That’s Lars Kenseth in the background (photo courtesy of Sarah Booth)

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Karasik, Liana Finck and Gabrielle Bell (photo courtesy of Paul Karasik)

 

 

 

 

Jason Adam Katzenstein, unidentified, Roz Chast speaking with Sara Lautman (back to camera), and Chris Weyant far right.

 

 

 

Chris Weyant (partially obscured), Farley Katz, unidentified, David Sipress, New Yorker writer Matt Dellinger (in checked shirt), Andy Friedman, Danny Shanahan. The group in the back: Drew Panckeri, Mitra Farmand, Sara Lautman, Kendra Allenby

 

Sam Gross and Robert Leighton

 

Bob Mankoff and David Remnick

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Cater, with the New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes, and Avi Steinberg

 

 

 

George Booth and David Borchart

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Dator and Peter Kuper

 

 

Felipe Galindo and Carolita Johnson

 

 

 

John O’Brien and Bob Eckstein

 

 

Three former cartoon department assistants: Marshall Hopkins, Emily Votruba, and Andy Friedman (photo courtesy of Marshall Hopkins)

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Weyant and Paul Noth

 

 

Matt Dellinger with  Stanley Ledbetter, and Matt Diffee (and way back by the window: Chad Darbyshire to the left, and Amy Hwang to the right)

 

 

 

 

P.C. Vey and Trevor Hoey

 

 

 

 

 

Kim Warp, Pat Byrnes, and George Booth

 

 

 

Sam Gross and Roz Chast

 

 

 

 

l-r: P.C. Vey, Liza Donnelly, Danny Shanahan, George Booth, and Michael Maslin (photo courtesy of Sarah Booth)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Weyant and Liana Finck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Gross and Lars Kenseth

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Lewis, Andy Friedman, and Barbara Smaller

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pat Byrnes, Paul Karasik, and Peter Kuper

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marc Philippe Eskenazi and Ben Schwartz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie Hankin, Amy Hwang, Kendra Allenby, and Avi Steinberg

 

 

 

Marshall Hopkins with Bob Mankoff’s first assistant, Emily Votruba (Mr. Hopkins was also at one time Mr. Mankoff’s assistant)

 

 

 

Far left: David Sipress speaks with Andy Friedman.  Foreground: Barbara Smaller, Emily Flake and P.C. Vey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

l-r: Felipe Galindo, Marshall Hopkins, Sam Gross, Mort Gerberg, and Ed Koren

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Koren, Michael Maslin, Liza Donnelly and a photobombing David Remnick. That’s Charlie Hankin in the back, far right.

 

 

 

 

Here’s an  incomplete list of all the cartoonists who were there (if you were there and don’t appear on this list, please let me know)

Kendra Allenby, George Booth, David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, Chris Cater, Roz Chast, Joe Dator, Chad Darbyshire, Drew Dernavich, Matt Diffee, Liza Donnelly, Bob Eckstein, Mitra Farmand, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat), Felipe Galindo(aka feggo), Mort Gerberg,  Sam Gross, Charlie Hankin, Marshall Hopkins, Amy Hwang, Edward Koren, Trevor Hoey, Carolita Johnson, Paul Karasik, Farley Katz, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Lars Kenseth,  John Klossner, Ken Krimstein, Peter Kuper, Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman, Robert Leighton, Eric Lewis, Bob Mankoff, Sam Marlow, Michael Maslin,  Paul Noth,  Jeremy Nguyen, John O’Brien, Drew Panckeri, Corey Pandolph, Ellis Rosen, Jennifer Saura, Ben Schwartz, Danny Shanahan, David Sipress,  Avi Steinberg, P.C. Vey, Kim Warp, Chris Weyant.  

The Passing of the Baskets

 

This week, as has been noted here, and plenty of places elsewhere, is Bob Mankoff’s last as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor.  Emma Allen, who is the magazine’s Daily Shouts editor, will become the center of the New Yorker cartoon world next week, and as such, will automatically become the focus of all existing New Yorker cartoonists and all want-to-be New Yorker cartoonists on the planet. And along with all the perks and pecks of being cartoon editor, Ms. Allen will take the New Yorker cartoon version of the baton from Mr. Mankoff  — the baton in this case: three wire baskets —  the three most important baskets in the New Yorker cartoonists’ universe. The baskets, labeled Yes, No, and Maybe are brought to the editor’s desk every week along with a pile of submissions selected by the cartoon editor out of thousands that have come into the office.

  David Remnick, the current editor of the New Yorker, then sifts through the pile, selecting the chosen few that land in the Yes basket. These are the “OKed” drawings so valued by every cartoonist submitting to the magazine. 

In Mr. Mankoff’s twenty years, he’s carried those baskets to Mr. Remnick’s office countless times (there’s possibly or probably a log noting the date of every Art Meeting, so technically, they can be counted, but who’s counting). The Yes basket has been filled and refilled hundreds of times with  the work of veteran cartoonists and over a hundred new cartoonists Mr. Mankoff brought into the magazine. A couple of years ago, when I interviewed Lee Lorenz, Mr. Mankoff’s predecessor, he told me that he felt the most important part of his job was finding new artists for the magazine. Mr. Lorenz, who held the job for twenty-four years, brought in approximately forty cartoonists (I’ll list them someday.  And note, I’m only talking about cartoonists here, not artists who were strictly cover artists).  Mr. Mankoff, whose “open door” policy made it far easier to sell a cartoon to the magazine, brought in close to one hundred and thirty (by my unofficial but not too off the mark count). Cartoon scholars will no doubt debate the ripple effects of these two schools of introducing new cartoonists. 

If Mr. Mankoff was not a cartoonist himself and the originator of the Cartoon Bank, I’d say these cartoonists he brought in were his legacy at the magazine.  But the cartoonists he brought in are surely a big part of what he leaves behind (as is how their work changed the magazine’s cartoon landscape).  And so in the spirit of wrapping things up with a nice big bow, I’m listing all of those whose work first hit the Yes basket on Mr. Mankoff’s watch (it is possible less than a handful of these cartoonists were brought in by the magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.  As always, corrections are welcome).  Ink Spill will of course carry on noting the new cartoonists brought in under Ms. Allen.  Exciting times ahead!

Cartoonists are presented in order of the year their first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker

1997: Aaron Bacall

1998: Christopher Weyant, Pat Byrnes, Nick Downes, Joe Duffy, William Haefeli, Aline Kominsky (Crumb), Marisa Acocella Marchetto, David Sipress

1999: Paul Karasik, John Caldwell, Matt Diffee, Benita Epstein, Alex Gregory, Michael Shaw, Steve Way, Robert Sikoryak, Kim Warp

2000: Ken Krimstein, Eric Lewis

2001: Chad Darbyshire, Steve Duenes, Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat)

2002: Jonny Cohen, Drew Dernavich, Felipe Galindo ( aka feggo), Robert Leighton, Seth

2003: Donna Barstow, Erik Hilgerdt, Carolita Johnson, John Kane

2004: Marshall Hopkins, Keith Bendis, John Donohue, Glen Le Lievre, Paul Noth, Jason Patterson, Emily Richards

2005: Zach Kanin, Rob Esmay, Arthur Geisert, Sam Means, Ariel Molvig

2006: Joe Dator, Pete Holmes, Evan Forsch, Martha Gradisher, Jason Polan, Julia Suits

2007: Farley Katz, Dave Coverly, David Borchart, Caroline Dworin, Bob Eckstein, Ward Sutton

2008: Emily Flake, John Klossner, Rini Piccolo, Michael Rae Grant, Jose Arroyo, Sean O’Neill

2009: Trevor Hoey, Karen Sneider, Shannon Wheeler

2010: Amy Hwang, Kate Beaton, Isaac LittleJohn Eddy, Kaamran Hafeez, Steve Macone, Mark Thompson, Tom Toro

2011: Corey Pandolph, Jennifer Saura, Ben Schwartz, Liam Walsh

2012: Avi Steinberg, Erik Bergstrom, Rich Feldman

2013: Liana Finck, Charlie Hankin. Julian Rowe, Ed Steed

2014: Tom Chitty, Jake Goldwasser, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Will McPhail, Jacob Samuel, Trevor Spaulding, Adam Cooper & Mat Barton, Chris Cater, T.S. McCoy, Jeanne Darst & Andrew Swift, Ali Rushfield, Peter Berkowitz, Michael Kupperman

2015: Zohan Lazar, Matthew Stiles Davis, Cameron Harvey, Mitra Farmand, Drew Panckeri, Dan Roe, Tim Hamilton, Julia Wertz & Josh Wertz, Colin Tom, Tom Hamilton, Dan Abromowitz & Eli Dreyfus, Brian McLachlan, Andrew Hamm

2016: Kendra Allenby, Seth Fleishman, Darrin Bell, Kate Curtis, Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman, Brendan Loper, Christian Lowe, John McNamee, Rich Sparks, Emily Nemens, Sam Marlow, Ellis Rosen, Lars Kenseth

2017: Jeremy Nguyen, Alice Cheng, Jim Benton, Maddy Dai
Maggie Larson, Jason Chatfield

Note:

  • Bolded names: these cartoonists were at one time cartoon department assistants
  • If you see two names joined by an “&” it means they worked as a team, and were acknowledged as such in the magazine’s Table of Contents.

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Emma Allen To Succeed New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a memo to all New Yorker Cartoonists this afternoon, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick announced that  Emma Allen, a New Yorker editor will succeed Bob Mankoff as cartoon editor in two months time.

In part, the memo reads:

The person I’ve chosen to be the next cartoon editor is Emma Allen, who has worked in recent years an editor of The Talk of the Town, a writer, and the driving force behind Daily Shouts, which is one of the best features of newyorker.com. Unlike Bob and Lee, she is not a cartoonist, but then neither was James Geraghty, who did the job before Lee. (Hell, William Shawn was not a writer, either, and he wasn’t too bad in the editing department.) Emma has a terrific eye for talent, knows the history of cartooning deeply, and is an immensely energetic and intelligent and sympathetic editor. She will work with Colin Stokes on selecting cartoons, running the caption contest, and creating a bigger digital footprint for cartoons. I am quite sure that we have only just begun to figure out new ways to explore and exploit digital technologies as a way to distribute your work to more and new readers. All of this is intended to stake out a healthy future for cartoons at The New Yorker.

Ms. Allen will be the third person in the magazine’s history in charge of editing its cartoons (Rea Irvin, who helped the magazine’s founder develop the New Yorker’s cartoon culture, was considered the art supervisor).  James Geraghty,  hired in 1939, was the first official cartoon editor (his title was Art Editor).  Lee Lorenz succeeded Mr. Geraghty in 1973 and held that position (as Art Editor from 1973 -1993 and then as cartoon editor from 1993-1997) until Mr. Mankoff was appointed in ’97.

Update: In a statement released to the press, Mr. Mankoff had this to say:

“My greatest gratitude goes to the cartoonists. I know how much easier it is to pick a good cartoon than do one, much less the many thousands they have done and will continue to do,” Mankoff said. “And, continue they will, with Emma Allen who now takes over this most iconic of all New Yorker features. I wish her and them the best of luck. And me, too—I’ve got to find that old cartoon pen of mine.” 

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The filmmaker Sally Williams has been hard at work on her documentary about James Stevenson. Here’s a brief clip from the film.

Link here for even more on Sally Williams

Link here to see some of Mr. Stevenson’s New Yorker work

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The New Yorker is Ad Age’s Magazine of the Year; The Tilley Watch: A New Yorker Christmassy Carol

Eustace Tilley's Fanned Out.

 

I took this photo of the Spill‘s Eustace Tilley collection a few years ago — seems appropriate to post it today to celebrate Advertising Age naming The New Yorker Magazine of the Year, its editor, David Remnick as Editor of the Year and Lisa Hughes as Publisher of the Year. Congrats to all!  Read the article here.

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_______________________________________________________________________________________Tilley Watch...

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From newyorker.com, December 19, 2016 “Comma Queen: A Christmassy Carol”  See the video here

 

Below: the folks appearing in the video:

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