Chris Weyant Answers Three Questions; Steig’s Divorce Illustrations; Three Cartoonists at Pennsylvania Fest; Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

 Chris Weyant Answers Three Questions

From The Children’s Book Council, September 5, 2018, “Three Questions With Chris Weyant”

Mr. Weyant began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1998. Link here to his website.

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Steig’s Divorce Illustrations

Thanks to a fave Spill blog, Attempted Bloggery, we’re able to see some great William Steig illustrations that appeared in American Magazine in the early 1940s.

Mr. Steig’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

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Three Cartoonists at Pennsylvania Festival

Bob Eckstein, Chris Weyant, and David Borchart (above, left to right) will appear at the Milford (Pa.) Festival on September 30th.  Read all about it here.

Their work appears in the upcoming anthology, “The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons by the World’s Greatest Cartoonists” a collection edited by Mr. Eckstein. Due out, March, 2019.

Mr. Eckstein’s latest book is The Illustrated History of the Snowman (Globe Pequot Press). Out now!

Also out is Eraser (Two Lions),by Anna Kang, illustrated by Mr. Weyant.

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Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

Everybody’s got an opinion, but only two folks (“Max” & “Simon”) devote blog space on a regular basis to sizing up every cartoon in each issue of The New Yorker. Read here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 27th, 2018

  Kadir Nelson‘s cover (a tribute to Aretha Franklin) was posted last week.  Not mentioned here at the time (but noted on the New Yorker‘s Table of Contents): the image was inspired by Charles W. White’s Folksinger. 

The new issue’s “Fall Preview” accounts for the abundance of arts ads and illustrations. 

The cartoons:

Now we’re talkin’: sixteen cartoons in this issue vs last week’s nine.  A number of the sixteen cartoons stand out for various reasons. Two of them (I won’t single them out) are beyond me. Not long ago I would’ve emailed Jack Ziegler to explain them to me. It was always comforting when Jack didn’t understand a drawing either. Often he’d respond with a variation of, “I don’t know what the hell it means.”

 Now for some others that stood out (these I understand): Seth Fleishman‘s mirror ball drawing cements his reputation as the New Yorker‘s mirror ball guy. Funny drawing. Also very funny: Joe Dator‘s “hunny” sniffing Pooh airport scenario. And then there’s David Borchart‘s sea-faring koala drawing. Oh my my my. I mentioned Jack Ziegler before. I think Jack would’ve loved these drawings — they’re wonderfully in his ballpark of way-out-there. A Spill round of applause.

A thought here about the placement of every cartoon in the issue: none seemed pressed for space, in need of breathing room. Victoria Roberts doctor’s office drawing (p.69) and Ellis Rosen‘s (p.42) are good examples. The reader can really enjoy the fine drawing going on in these pieces (and in others).

This issue includes the debut New Yorker cartoon by Caitlin Cass. Ms. Cass is the seventeenth new cartoonist brought in since cartoon editor, Emma Allen was appointed in the Spring of 2017. Ms. Cass’s style — mostly the way she handles faces — reminds me of a New Yorker cover artist from the Golden Age: Christina Malman.  Oddly enough, while looking through Ms. Malman’s twenty-four covers for the magazine I came across one (shown below) thematically linked to Ms. Cass’s drawing of children looking at art in a museum.

A final thought before Rea Irvin’s classic missing masthead shows up at the end of this post: I’m wondering if Emma Hunsinger‘s funny caption for her drawing on page 77 would’ve also worked if the word “aren’t” was “are”…and if that’s so — if it’s so how often it happens in cartoon captions that a word completely flipped can still work with the drawing. In this case, substituting “are” for “aren’t” would radically change the intent. Ms. Hunsinger’s use of the word “aren’t” suggests the parents are concerned their child’s behavior is unusual. By using “are” the parents would instead be hopeful that their child’s behavior might make for a viral video.

For the record, here is the list of cartoonists in this issue:

And now, as promised, the missing Irvin masthead.

 — See you next week

 

 

 

A Thursday Round-up: Fall Cartoonist Panel of Interest Includes Eckstein, Acocella, Borchart, and Weyant; New Yorker State of Mind’s Look at the Issue of June 8, 1929; Fawkes’ Bronte Book

Fall Cartoonist Panel of Interest

Not too early to pencil this one in on your Fall calendar: Bob Eckstein, Marisa Acocella, David Borchart, and Chris Weyant will appear September 29th at the Milford Readers & Writers Festival. Here’s a piece about the festival.

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A New Yorker State of Mind Goes deep into the New Yorker issue of June 8 , 1929. One of the Spill‘s favorite blogs continues to inform and entertain. Read it here.

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Fawkes’ Bronte Book

Above: an excerpt from Glynnis Fawkes’ graphic piece on Seven Days Vermont, “A Cartoonist/Writer Draws Parallels With Charlotte Bronte” (See the rest here). Ms. Fawkes’ work has appeared on newyorker.com. According to the bio provided on Seven Days Ms. Fawkes’ bio of Charlotte Bronte will appear in 2019.

 

 

The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Fave Photo of the Day

Cartoon Companion is back with their deep-ish takes on every cartoon in the latest issue of the New Yorker (May 28, 2018). Charlie Hankin is awarded the CC’s “Top Toon” ribbon.  Read it here!

Mr. Hankin has been contributing to The New Yorker since August of 2013. Link to his website here.

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Fave Photo of the Day

Five New Yorker cartoonists today in lower Manhattan: clockwise from top left: Bob Eckstein, Ken Krimstein, Robert Leighton, Nick Downes, and David Borchart.  

Mr. Eckstein has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007; Mr. Krimstein since 2000, Mr. Leighton since 2002; Mr. Downes since 1998; Mr. Borchart since 2007.

(photo courtesy of Spill photographer, Bob Eckstein)

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at the Society of Illustrators; Interview of Interest: Tom Toro; Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden; Brendan Loper’s Town Square; Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at The Society of Illustrators

As visitors to this site know, there’s an exhibit of work by George Booth at The Society of Illustrators. The show is a real treat.  Last night Mr. Booth was on stage in front of a packed house, telling stories and answering questions. Here are some photos, courtesy of Liza Donnelly.

Above, left – right: George Booth; Jeremy Nguyen (hat, green glasses), David Borchart (green sweater); Bob Eckstein (with pen & paper).

Below,  left – right: Seth Fleishman (back to camera), Drew Dernavich, Corey Pandolph; Sam Gross, Maria Scrivan.

Below: the scene at The Society.  On stage: Sarah Booth, George Booth, and J.J. Sedelmaier, who curated the exhibit.

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Interview of Interest: Tom Toro

From Fiction Writers Review, November 7, 2017, “Setting the Tone: An Interview with Tom Toro”

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Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden

___________________________________________________________________________________  Brendan Loper’s Town Square

From the Lititiz Record Express,  November 8, 2017,  “Drawing attention to Lititiz: New Yorker cartoon causes mixed reactions”— this piece on a recent New Yorker “Daily” cartoon by Brendan Loper

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Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Coming in June, 2018 from University Press of Mississippi, Conversations: Peter Kuper (Conversations With Comic Artists Series).

From the publisher:

Along with two dozen images, this volume features ten lively, informative interviews with Kuper. The book also includes a quartet of revealing interviews with underground comix legends R. Crumb and Vaughn Bodé, Mad magazine publisher William Gaines, and Jack Kirby, co-creator of mainstream superheroes from the Avengers to the Fantastic Four. These were conducted by Kuper and fellow artist Seth Tobocman in the early 1970s, when they were teenagers. 

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