A Thursday Round-up: Fall Cartoonist Panel of Interest Includes Eckstein, Acocella, Borchart, and Weyant; New Yorker State of Mind’s Look at the Issue of June 8, 1929; Fawkes’ Bronte Book

Fall Cartoonist Panel of Interest

Not too early to pencil this one in on your Fall calendar: Bob Eckstein, Marisa Acocella, David Borchart, and Chris Weyant will appear September 29th at the Milford Readers & Writers Festival. Here’s a piece about the festival.

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A New Yorker State of Mind Goes deep into the New Yorker issue of June 8 , 1929. One of the Spill‘s favorite blogs continues to inform and entertain. Read it here.

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Fawkes’ Bronte Book

Above: an excerpt from Glynnis Fawkes’ graphic piece on Seven Days Vermont, “A Cartoonist/Writer Draws Parallels With Charlotte Bronte” (See the rest here). Ms. Fawkes’ work has appeared on newyorker.com. According to the bio provided on Seven Days Ms. Fawkes’ bio of Charlotte Bronte will appear in 2019.

 

 

The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Fave Photo of the Day

Cartoon Companion is back with their deep-ish takes on every cartoon in the latest issue of the New Yorker (May 28, 2018). Charlie Hankin is awarded the CC’s “Top Toon” ribbon.  Read it here!

Mr. Hankin has been contributing to The New Yorker since August of 2013. Link to his website here.

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Fave Photo of the Day

Five New Yorker cartoonists today in lower Manhattan: clockwise from top left: Bob Eckstein, Ken Krimstein, Robert Leighton, Nick Downes, and David Borchart.  

Mr. Eckstein has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007; Mr. Krimstein since 2000, Mr. Leighton since 2002; Mr. Downes since 1998; Mr. Borchart since 2007.

(photo courtesy of Spill photographer, Bob Eckstein)

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at the Society of Illustrators; Interview of Interest: Tom Toro; Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden; Brendan Loper’s Town Square; Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at The Society of Illustrators

As visitors to this site know, there’s an exhibit of work by George Booth at The Society of Illustrators. The show is a real treat.  Last night Mr. Booth was on stage in front of a packed house, telling stories and answering questions. Here are some photos, courtesy of Liza Donnelly.

Above, left – right: George Booth; Jeremy Nguyen (hat, green glasses), David Borchart (green sweater); Bob Eckstein (with pen & paper).

Below,  left – right: Seth Fleishman (back to camera), Drew Dernavich, Corey Pandolph; Sam Gross, Maria Scrivan.

Below: the scene at The Society.  On stage: Sarah Booth, George Booth, and J.J. Sedelmaier, who curated the exhibit.

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Interview of Interest: Tom Toro

From Fiction Writers Review, November 7, 2017, “Setting the Tone: An Interview with Tom Toro”

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Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden

___________________________________________________________________________________  Brendan Loper’s Town Square

From the Lititiz Record Express,  November 8, 2017,  “Drawing attention to Lititiz: New Yorker cartoon causes mixed reactions”— this piece on a recent New Yorker “Daily” cartoon by Brendan Loper

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Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Coming in June, 2018 from University Press of Mississippi, Conversations: Peter Kuper (Conversations With Comic Artists Series).

From the publisher:

Along with two dozen images, this volume features ten lively, informative interviews with Kuper. The book also includes a quartet of revealing interviews with underground comix legends R. Crumb and Vaughn Bodé, Mad magazine publisher William Gaines, and Jack Kirby, co-creator of mainstream superheroes from the Avengers to the Fantastic Four. These were conducted by Kuper and fellow artist Seth Tobocman in the early 1970s, when they were teenagers. 

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The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of October 23, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

This week’s cover (by R. Kikuo Johnson, who we learn from the Contributors page teaches cartooning at the Rhode Island School of Design) is of robots on their way to wherever robots go to. One has an on-the-go cup of coffee(?) while another carries an old-fashioned lunch box.  When I was a little kid, I was slightly fascinated by the lunchbox a neighbor (his name was Joe) carried to and from his factory job everyday. I sometimes wondered what was in his lunchbox and whether he had the same lunch everyday. Anyway, back to the cover. I thought seeing all the technology, it was going to be a Technology Issue, but no… it’s the Money Issue. The semi-Tilley on the Table of Contents alerts us to the theme:

Anyone who reads Ink Spill can probably guess that Tilley tampering (see yesterday’s Spill) will be duly noted here. Other examples :

Now on to the issue’s cartoons, and it doesn’t take long at all to find one. A nicely placed Tom Cheney drawing appears on page 4 directly following the end of the magazine’s Table of Contents.  I like that the magazine does this every so often and not all the time.  It’s a fun surprise.  Mr. Cheney takes one of the cartoonist’s most reliable  characters, death, to an artist’s studio. Artists studios, and artists, were very popular in years past, especially in the James Geraghty era (the New Yorker’s art editor from 1939 through 1973). Many of the best were gathered in The New Yorker Album of Art & Artists (New York Graphic Society, 1970).

There’ve been several other art-themed collections since (shown above: The New Yorker Book of Art Cartoons (Bloomberg, 2005), and The Museum of Modern Art Book of Cartoons (Museum of Modern Art, 2008 — a custom production), but the 1970 collection  is the mother ship, containing some of the most famous art cartoons in the magazine’s canon. 

Moving through the front of the magazine, I really like the beautiful photograph of a cow (in an ad for Louis Roederer) on page 15. What can I say? I love cows (to look at, admire, and occasionally pat on the head).

David Borchart has the second drawing of the issue. Age, of course, comes up most every time (heck, every time) there are Galapagos tortoises involved. Charles Addams (and there it is: an Addams reference and it’s only the second drawing of the issue) did several (I can remember three) — here’s one. Mr. Borchart delivers a caption that many can relate to, and just as many have probably heard said, or said.  As usual with his work, it’s beautifully drawn. The elder tortoises look kind’ve happy.

I don’t usually comment on the illustrations but I do really like the cup of coffee by Golden Cosmos on page 40. Six pages later we have an Amy Hwang  Jack and the Beanstalk drawing.  A more complicated drawing than we’re used to seeing from Ms. Hwang. I like the beanbag chairs — I picture them in color for some reason: left to right:  baby blue, brown, and rust colored.  Two pages later another keeper from BEK (Bruce Eric Kaplan). I’m reminded here of the late James Stevenson’s barely disguised textbook political satire.

On the very next page is a Mike Twohy cornucopia drawing. Cornucopia drawings aren’t as plentiful (haha?) as artist drawings once were, but they showed up from time-to-time, sometimes on the cover. Here’s a beauty by Arnie Levin from 1978 (and how convenient it is that it’s a baseball themed cover in this heavy-duty baseball time of year).

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Mr. Twohy’s cartoon, referring to a certain mega-online shopping site, is concerned with way more than baseballs. Eight pages later is a darkish Ed Steed drawing. His fishnet roller coaster recalls Lou Myers’s style (a snippet from a 1969 Myers United Airlines ad below left. On the right, a portion of Mr. Steed’s drawing). 

Three pages later a dog walk in the park drawing from the long-time Wildwood, New Jersey lifeguard (retd), John O’Brien. As mentioned in the last Monday Tilley Watch, Mr. O’Brien excels at captionless drawings (to my mind the hardest to do; Charles Addams told Dick Cavett captionless drawings were his personal favorites). Mr. O’Brien’s drawing is placed perfectly on the page.

Four pages later, newbie Maddie Dai returns with, yes, an Addamsy situation. If it seems like there are a lot of references to Mr. Addams in these posts it might be because his work — well over a thousand cartoons published in The New Yorker — touched on so many situations favored-by-cartoonists, especially, of course in his case, dark side situations. Of the notes I received from former New Yorker Art editor, Lee Lorenz during my years of his tenure (he was editor from 1973 – 1997;  I began receiving notes from him in 1977) at least three-quarters of them said, “Sorry — Addams already did this.” 

Three pages following Ms. Dai’s drawing is a Julia Suits be careful what you say out thereit just might get you in trouble drawing. On the very next page is an oddity that’s now appeared for the second issue in a row (wait, does that mean it’s not an oddity anymore): a collaborative drawing by Kaamran Hafeez and Al Batt. Mr. Hafeez is responsible for the drawing itself. The setting is that old New Yorker cartoon chestnut: a  business meeting.

Three pages later, a drawing by Farley Katz, a cartoonist who always shakes things up somehow.  I like the complexity of the drawing – the stethoscope connecting both doctors with the patient —  but I’m unsure who the “we” is in this case. Even on a very large screen it appears both women’s mouths are open, suggesting that they are both speaking.  Someone write in please and clarify.

Three more pages and we find Batman, beginning his memoir, recalling his childhood.  Nice drawing by Zach Kanin. I like how he’s shown us the Wayne family portrait over the mantel.  When I see a New Yorker Batman cartoon I immediately recall this 1989 classic by Danny Shanahan:

Three pages following Mr. Kanin’s Batman is the the second sidewalk Liana Finck drawing in two issues.  The beginning of a sidewalk series perhaps?  I like the little birds on the sidewalk. 

Alice Cheng, another newbie (her first New Yorker cartoon appeared in February of this year) is next with a salmon swimming upstream drawing. I love that this is here as it gives me an opportunity to recall the great 1998 Bill Woodman bears and salmon cartoon shown below.  Look at this drawing! Lovely, funny. This is what the late very great Jack Ziegler had to say about Mr. Woodman: “Bill Woodman is a great cartoonist and one of the funniest “draw-ers” of all time, right up there with George Booth.” 

 

Three pages later, a drawing of mine. I believe it’s the first time that I’ve had Uncle Sam in a New Yorker drawing.  Four pages later is a not-quite-so-empty nest drawing by another newbie, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who made her debut this month (not counting her caption contest appearance in September). I like the framed items on the wall, including the coffee mug, or mugs(?). On the very next page is what at first appears to be a doorman at an exclusive club situation.  But as it’s a Peter Vey drawing, it’s not, of course — it’s a writer needs to escape drawing. Nice stanchions!

The next to last drawing in the issue belongs to Avi Steinberg. A man at a diner counter encounters a teeny coffee cup.  As in an earlier drawing not long ago — not by Mr. Steinberg (I don’t think), I wonder about the level of the counter top in relation to the customer.  It’s either a very low counter, or a very tall customer. One wonders too if the customer is just walking by the counter and has remarked on the little cup of coffee.  There’s no indication of seating, so he isn’t about to sit; there are, however, items on the counter indicating customers might sit.  As I’ve said before, I like imagining a backstory. Good caption.

The final drawing in the issue (not counting the caption contest drawings) is by Carolita Johnson. A fortune teller!  As with Mr. Steinberg’s drawing, there’s some kind of perspective thing going on (with the door and the room) that caught my eye. You’ll see.

 — Back next Monday

 

 

 

Avi Steinberg

Carolita Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Gather for Cartoon Bank Event

Just a few days after a gathering of New Yorker cartoonists in Brooklyn (for the Not Ok exhibit) there was another gathering — this one last night at 1 World Trade Center.  Conde Nast, The New Yorker’s parent company hosted at get-together to introduce its new Cartoon Bank team to the artists. In the photo above from left to right: Felipe Galindo, Liana Finck, Colin Stokes, Jeremy Nguyen, Colin Tom, Farley Katz, Robert Leighton, and Ben Schwartz.

Above: the placard greeting visitors to the event.

Liza Donnelly provided all the photos here as well as this synopsis of the event:

We were greeted with glasses of wine and fancy little bites of food served on trays, and met by very friendly folks from Condé Nast. At 6:00 on the dot, there were already around six cartoonists there, and many more started filtering in —  the number reaching probably 40-50+ cartoonists. Everyone seemed so happy to be able to just hang out with each other and catch up. I saw friends I hadn’t seen for decades, and met new friends. It was a lovely mixture of new cartoonists and seasoned cartoonists, talking together. Remarks were made by our Condé Nast hosts, as well as from New Yorker editor David Remnick, who went casual in a short sleeved shirt. New cartoon editor, Emma Allen also spoke and welcomed the cartoonists.

There were classic cartoons framed on the gallery wall (all art from those in attendance). Interestingly, the breathtaking view from the 34th floor of the World Trade Center where the event was held quickly took a back seat to talking and laughing with pals. The whole evening had a fun buzz- and by 8:30 when I left, a large group was still lingering.

Photo Sep 25, 6 33 23 PM.jpg

Left photo: foreground, Huguette Martel, David Borchart on the left in profile; Evan Forsch is directly above Ms. Martel, looking over his glasses.  Robert Leighton in checked shirt. Photo right: Tom Hachtman in background, left. Chris Weyant in black polo shirt facing away from camera, Marisa Acocella Marchetto center. Mark Alan Stamaty in background in plum colored shirt talking with Tom Bachtell.

Below: the New Yorker’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen on left, then Ed Steed,  Julia Suits and the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes

Below, left photo: David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, John O’Brien; Right photo: New Yorker editor, David Remnick addresses the crowd.

Below, left photo: Frank Cotham, Sam Gross, Ed Steed. Photo right: Julia Suits and Bob Eckstein

Below: Andrea Arroyo, Felipe Galindo and Peter Kuper

Below, left photo: Liana Finck and Liza Donnelly. Photo right: Sam Marlow and Ellis Rosen

Below: Felipe Galindo and George Booth

Below: front and center, Barbara Smaller with Chris Weyant, and to the left, Huguette Martel speaks with Arnie Levin

Below left photo: Emily Flake, Jeremy Nguyen, Sara Lautman.  Photo right: Joe Dator and Ben Schwartz.

Below: Colin Tom, J.A.K. (Jason Adam Katzenstein) and Pat Byrnes, in profile

Below: Glen Le Lievre, John Jonik, and John O’Brien

Below: New Yorker publisher, Lisa Hughes speaks with George Booth. In the background, center, is Teresa Nash, part of the Cartoon Bank team.

 

Below left photo: Tom Bachtell, Marisabina Russo. Photo right: David Sipress, Ben Schwartz.

Below, foreground,  Emma Allen talks with Frank Cotham. That’s George Booth on the left and Barbara Smaller on the far right.

 

Below: Mark Alan Stamaty, Marcellus Hall, and Peter Kuper

Below: Marisa Acocello Marchetto and Sam Gross (Tom Hachtman in the back, right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of September 18, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

 Visitors to the Spill (and social media) have already had the weekend to digest the cover of the latest issue — it features the looming top-noggin of North Korea’s leader. The cover artist, Eric Drooker told Michael Cavna in a Washington Post piece: “I came up with the concept for next week’s New Yorker cover when I realized how little I know about Kim Jong Un. He’s an enigma. Who knows what goes on under the hood?…All we can see is the tip of the iceberg — an incomplete picture.” Fair enough.

Before getting to the cartoons this week, and instead of zipping through the GOAT (Goings On About town ) section, I’d like to mention a couple of non-cartoon graphics that made me pause, for better or worse:  a painting on page 6 by the artist Brian Calvin and a (colorized?) photograph on page 12. I won’t say which made me pause for the better or which  made me pause for the worse; the Monday Tilley Watch is not my soap box — it’s the curb I sit on while watching a parade go by.  

Now on to the cartoons. It doesn’t take long to reach David Borchart’s C.S. Lewis flavored drawing (If I’m wrong about this, someone please speak up). (Above: an illustration from the The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe)

Mr. Borchart, who has been contributing to the magazine since September of 2007, uses one of the most reliable tools in the cartoonist’s kit: a mash-up of fantasy and the all too real. As with every new cartoon I come across I automatically recall some previous cartoon with a similar stand-out characteristic — in this case the unicorn. I cannot see a drawing of a unicorn and not picture this classic Charles Addams drawing. It appeared in The New Yorker, March 10, 1956.

Four pages later is a subway drawing by  J.A.K. (Jason Adam Katzenstein — his first New Yorker cartoon appeared in November of 2014. It’s not my imagination, the magazine has run a goodly number of New York City subway drawings in the past few months (I’m not going to go back and count them. Trust me). It has dawned on me this very second that I could probably summon up a Charles Addams classic drawing somehow related to every cartoon in this issue.  In this case, Addams had a number of subway classics (here’s one). But enough of that game. 

Seven pages later is a Joe Dator bar scene. Mr. Dator’s first New Yorker appearance was in August of 2006. It’s always a gift when the cartoon gods hand a cartoonist a one-word switcheroo to make for a successful caption: in this case using “stopping” instead of “starting.” Fun sidebar: Mr. Dator has a podcast,  Songs You’re Sick Of.

A Roz Chast three panel drawing is next (her first cartoon appeared in 1978).  I like that Ms. Chast has ventured out of what we’ve (perhaps?) come to think of as a Chastian living room setting. We get to see a kitchen and foyer.  I’d love even more of a tour around her cartoon environment.  For instance: let’s see the basement…or the attic  (It’s possible we’ve already seen these spaces… Ms. Chast has published well over a thousand cartoons in the magazine).

Ten pages later, after a long piece about North Korea, is a Stephen King-ish  Will McPhail drawing. I have great sympathy for Mr. McPhail’s cartoon pinata in this cartoon. I’m resisting the  temptation here to recall one of many many Charles Addams’ drawings featuring mischievous children (or a mischievous child). I think I can safely say that none of Mr. Addams’ cartoon children ever threatened to harm a cartoon pinata.  (Mr. McPhail’s first New Yorker cartoon: December of 2014).

On the very next page is a thief-in-a-in-home drawing by newcomer Maddie Dai. As mentioned earlier in this post and previous posts, I try hard to keep subjectivity in check  in the Monday Tilley Watch, but this drawing gets a check plus. Can’t wait to see what the Cartoon Companion boys say about it later this week (their stock-in-trade is cartoon dissection and evaluation).  Ms. Dai’s first New Yorker appearance was this past June.

Three pages later is a BEK (Bruce Eric Kaplan) drawing.  Signature style, signature caption. Mr. Kaplan’s first drawing appeared in 1991.  Six pages later, an Emily Flake drawing, sort of in the area of Mr. Borchart’s: a mash-up of contemporary technology (texting) and slowing-moving-out-the-door lingo: actually hanging up a phone (and slowly-moving-out-the-door actual activity of hanging up a phone).  Ms. Flake’s first drawing appeared in September of 2008. Five pages later, a drawing by Barbara Smaller.  Like Mr. Kaplan: signature style, signature caption. Here Ms. Smaller avoids  the cartoonist’s go-to shrink’s divan for the patient and opts for a sofa.

 

Three pages later is the last drawing in the issue (not counting the Caption Contest drawings), and it’s by the ever reliable Paul Noth (in earlier years such cartoonists as James Stevenson, Frank Modell, and Donald Reilly were among the magazine’s sturdy cartoon oaks (seemingly) effortlessly providing us with good work week after week after week (after year after year after year).  Mr. Noth began at the New Yorker thirteen years ago.

See you next Monday.