The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of January 29, 2018

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

Always a pleasure to see a colleague’s work pop up as a New Yorker cover as I open up the digital edition early Monday morning. We (“we” meaning the New Yorker‘s contributing cartoonists) used to be responsible (my unofficial estimate) for 60% of the covers during the year. Since Tina Brown’s era it’s somewhere around 1% to 5%. Roz Chast, Bruce Kaplan, Danny Shanahan, Harry Bliss, and George Booth would be the five percent. In 2017, just Ms. Chast’s and Mr. Kaplan’s work appeared on the cover.  In 2016, it was just Mr. Shanahan’s; in 2015 just Mr. Bliss’s work appeared on the cover — well, you get the idea). This one by Ms. Chast is graphically eye-catching.  It was ever-so-slightly difficult to appreciate on the tablet, so it was off to the laptop for a bigger image. I think the cover perfectly captures some people’s notion  (or reality) of January in New York City. The scarf knitted, then lost days later on the train, is shown on the magazine’s strap (the traditional vertical border running on the left side of the magazine’s covers) — it’s a nice touch.

Moving into the magazine I noted an attractive snippet of a Grant Snider drawing from a Daily Shouts piece. The blues reminded me of William Steig’s blues he used in a great number of his children’s books.

Oh, here’s a thought: why not reinstate Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk of The Town masthead in the magazine’s 93rd anniversary issue — just a few issues away. How great would that be! Mr. Irvin’s is directly below, with the re-do directly below it. 

To read more on the Mr. Irvin’s gem and its replacement, check out this Spill piece

Now on to the magazine’s cartoons. The first, by Amy Kurzweil, appears on page 19. A somewhat dark (yet not-so-dark!) take on flight delays.  I’m guessing many would enjoy a bonus three hours of life.  Nice handling of the plane out on the tarmac. Eleven pages later, the aforementioned Bruce Kaplan has a couple of kitties chatting in a living room.  As one who came later to cat appreciation, I appreciate the sentiment of the drawing, as well (as usual) as the drawing itself.

Noted along the way from Ms. Kurzweil’s drawing to Mr. Kaplan’s: Rui Ruireiro’s spot drawings making good use of yellow.  I see the predominant use of yellow in the New Yorker (especially if it involves a yellow cab, such as on page 28) and I’m immediately reminded of Steinberg’s masterful use of it on a cover back in 1979:

Four pages following Mr. Kaplan’s kitties, a wonderful Edward Koren drawing (wait, is there any other kind?). As with the last number of Koren cartoons published this one is given ample space to breathe on the page. Textbook placement. 

On the very next page a drawing by a relative newcomer, Pia Guerra. Who knew guessing weights at a carnival could lead to violence.  By the look of the weight guesser he has yet to be pummeled.  

Three pages later, a rather large funnel, or, ah, tunnel, drawing by Colin Tom (sorry, no website for Mr. Tom, that i know of. Please advise). I kind’ve wish this wasn’t in a boxy border (it’s obvious by now — maybe?– that I believe New Yorker cartoons thrive in a roomy habitat). On the very next page, an Amy Hwang drawing with a terrific caption.  I was about to note that this was a cat-free Hwang drawing when I spied a framed kitty on the cubicle wall.

The cartoons keep-a-comin in this issue: two more on the next two pages. The first by David Sipress and and the next by Paul Noth. Mr. Sipress’s recalls David Letterman’s, “I do and do and do for you kids — and this is what I get.” Mr. Noth’s refers to one of my favorite scenarios: the old women who lives in a shoe. In this case she’s spending some down time at a bar. I must say that the self-proclaimed old woman in Mr. Noth’s drawing appears quite young.  Perhaps she’s just starting out in life, in the shoe? Ten pages later a subway drawing couched as a personal hygiene drawing by Carolita Johnson. Clipping one’s nails while riding the subway seems risky. 

On the very next page, a Joe Dator drawing that set-off the Spill‘s applause meter. I’m leaving the applause meter out for Tom Chitty‘s drawing five pages later. 

Another five pages later, a Mick Stevens doctor’s office. I spent a lot of time trying to figure out  if what appears to be a jar of rubber glue on the front right of the desk is in fact a jar of rubber glue.  Four pages later a Frank Cotham drawing in a very familiar Frank Cotham scenario. On the very next page, the last drawing of the issue, not counting the caption contest: a charming charming Liana Finck drawing. I don’t know why, but I wanted the Earl of Sandwich to be the one asking the other guy the question. The cartoonist’s fuss-o-meter never rests.   

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Photos from the Kovarsky Opening; “Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

Among the magazine’s Daily cartoons this week:  Kim Warp’s weary winter weather drawing; Brendan Loper’s tweeter-in-chief cartoon;  Lars Kenseth’s  take on this week’s  unusual White House media moment, and Peter Kuper’s Trumpian map of the world.   

Over on Daily Shouts, these were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen and Liana Finck

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Photos From the Kovarsky Opening at The Society of Illustrators

A packed house last night at the Society of Illustrators Opening Reception for Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker. Here’s an array of photos (all by Liza Donnelly, with one exception: the photo of Liza Donnelly and her husband– that’s courtesy of Gina Kovarsky)

Above: a wall of Kovarskys.

Below: Anatol Kovarsky’s daughter, Gina, and Mr. Kovarsky’s wife, Lucille Patton; Ellen Lind and John Lind.  Gina Kovarsky and John Lind co-curated the exhibit.

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Sam Gross and Felipe Galindo

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Liza Donnelly and Michael Maslin

Below: Sam Gross and New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein

Below: Writer/illustrator Mo Willems, Columbia University’s Curator for Comics and Cartoons, Karen Green, and John Lind

 

A closing thought on the exhibit, which runs til March 3 of this year:

This is a terrific show.  The energy bouncing off Mr. Kovarsky’s work on the walls is inspiring.   After looking at all of the covers and drawings I went back and spent more time looking at Mr. Kovarsky’s very first cartoon for the New Yorker.  It was published in the issue of March 1, 1947; here’s how it appeared:

I’ve always had a special affection for first New Yorker drawings.  It is, as they say, a moment.  Every cartoonist remembers the details surrounding their first published drawing. The unspoken mini-drama surrounding the first is that no one knows, of course, whether there’ll be a second (see the Spill‘s One Clubbers on the A-Z).  In Mr. Kovarsky’s case there was a second, and then there were hundreds more — close to 300 in fact. If that wasn’t something impressive in itself, he also contributed 40 covers.  And all this work was done in the relatively short time span of twenty-two years (according to Gina Kovarsky: “In the 1970s, Kovarsky shifted his main focus from cartooning to fine art…”).  It will not come as a surprise to anyone seeing this exhibit how Kovarsky accomplished so much in a mere two decades. It is as if he never set his pen or his brush down for a moment. Kovarsky’s world seemed to be abuzz 24/7. How lucky for us all.   

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“Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

From Westchester Magazine, January 12, 2018, “You Can Meet New Yorker Cartoonists…”

 Here’s a capsule description from the article:

“Not OK” — Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough is a collection of works by previous New Yorker-published cartoonists that fit exactly that bill. Curated by artist and Brooklynite David Ostow, this series has come to Westchester for a month-long showing following the completion of its original gallery run in Bushwick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 27: Frank Beaven; Tilley Watch Online

If you search for Frank Beaven online (as I recently have) a variety of work shows up, from “girlie” magazine covers to advertising work to New Yorker appearances (he contributed 15 cartoons to the magazine between 1933 and 1946). Here’s a slight auto-biographical piece and self-portrait he contributed to the 1941 collection, Colliers Collects Its Wits. Below that are three ads by Mr. Beaven, all courtesy of Warren Bernard: Eveready (1943), Zippo (1946), and  B.F. Goodrich (1946).

Below: another Eveready ad from the website, Hairy Green Eyeball, where you can find a nice collection of more Eveready ads by Mr. Beaven as well as by various cartoonists. 

Below:  another Zippo ad (from 1942) This one from a Zippo-centric website.

Another auto-biographical piece and self-portrait, along with a New Yorker drawing ( it appeared in the issue of March 13, 1943) from the Best Cartoons of the Year 1943:

More info:

  1. Here’s Mr. Beaven’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z: Franklin (Frank) Beaven Born, Lebanon, Indiana, c.1905. Died Allendale, New Jersey, 1975. New Yorker work: May 20, 1933 – March 2, 1946. Beaven also wrote articles for the old Life , and Judge. Besides The New Yorker, his cartoons appeared in Colliers, The Saturday Evening Post, Country Gentleman, and others.

2. The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum posted this piece about Mr. Beaven back in 2012.

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…this week’s Daily cartoon featured a senator’s eye exam (executed by David Sipress), fallen dynamos, uh, I mean dominoes courtesy of Kim Warp; a plugged-in Little Mermaid by Jeremy Nguyen; an axe-wielding President by Peter Kuper, and headlines in the morning news(paper) from Kim Warp. Daily Shouts pieces included two cartoon colleagues: Colin Tom (“Trump’s Desert-Island Sand Trap”) and Ellis Rosen (“Make Your Own G.O.P. Tax Bill”).    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Yorker Cartoonists Gather for Cartoon Bank Event

Just a few days after a gathering of New Yorker cartoonists in Brooklyn (for the Not Ok exhibit) there was another gathering — this one last night at 1 World Trade Center.  Conde Nast, The New Yorker’s parent company hosted at get-together to introduce its new Cartoon Bank team to the artists. In the photo above from left to right: Felipe Galindo, Liana Finck, Colin Stokes, Jeremy Nguyen, Colin Tom, Farley Katz, Robert Leighton, and Ben Schwartz.

Above: the placard greeting visitors to the event.

Liza Donnelly provided all the photos here as well as this synopsis of the event:

We were greeted with glasses of wine and fancy little bites of food served on trays, and met by very friendly folks from Condé Nast. At 6:00 on the dot, there were already around six cartoonists there, and many more started filtering in —  the number reaching probably 40-50+ cartoonists. Everyone seemed so happy to be able to just hang out with each other and catch up. I saw friends I hadn’t seen for decades, and met new friends. It was a lovely mixture of new cartoonists and seasoned cartoonists, talking together. Remarks were made by our Condé Nast hosts, as well as from New Yorker editor David Remnick, who went casual in a short sleeved shirt. New cartoon editor, Emma Allen also spoke and welcomed the cartoonists.

There were classic cartoons framed on the gallery wall (all art from those in attendance). Interestingly, the breathtaking view from the 34th floor of the World Trade Center where the event was held quickly took a back seat to talking and laughing with pals. The whole evening had a fun buzz- and by 8:30 when I left, a large group was still lingering.

Photo Sep 25, 6 33 23 PM.jpg

Left photo: foreground, Huguette Martel, David Borchart on the left in profile; Evan Forsch is directly above Ms. Martel, looking over his glasses.  Robert Leighton in checked shirt. Photo right: Tom Hachtman in background, left. Chris Weyant in black polo shirt facing away from camera, Marisa Acocella Marchetto center. Mark Alan Stamaty in background in plum colored shirt talking with Tom Bachtell.

Below: the New Yorker’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen on left, then Ed Steed,  Julia Suits and the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes

Below, left photo: David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, John O’Brien; Right photo: New Yorker editor, David Remnick addresses the crowd.

Below, left photo: Frank Cotham, Sam Gross, Ed Steed. Photo right: Julia Suits and Bob Eckstein

Below: Andrea Arroyo, Felipe Galindo and Peter Kuper

Below, left photo: Liana Finck and Liza Donnelly. Photo right: Sam Marlow and Ellis Rosen

Below: Felipe Galindo and George Booth

Below: front and center, Barbara Smaller with Chris Weyant, and to the left, Huguette Martel speaks with Arnie Levin

Below left photo: Emily Flake, Jeremy Nguyen, Sara Lautman.  Photo right: Joe Dator and Ben Schwartz.

Below: Colin Tom, J.A.K. (Jason Adam Katzenstein) and Pat Byrnes, in profile

Below: Glen Le Lievre, John Jonik, and John O’Brien

Below: New Yorker publisher, Lisa Hughes speaks with George Booth. In the background, center, is Teresa Nash, part of the Cartoon Bank team.

 

Below left photo: Tom Bachtell, Marisabina Russo. Photo right: David Sipress, Ben Schwartz.

Below, foreground,  Emma Allen talks with Frank Cotham. That’s George Booth on the left and Barbara Smaller on the far right.

 

Below: Mark Alan Stamaty, Marcellus Hall, and Peter Kuper

Below: Marisa Acocello Marchetto and Sam Gross (Tom Hachtman in the back, right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictures At An Exhibition: Not Ok

Here’s a great photo taken last night at the Not Ok group show (recently profiled in The New York Times). 

Front row:
Ellis Rosen, Brendon Loper, Jeremy Nguyen, Lars Kenseth, Amy Kurzweil

Back Row: Sam Marlow, Mitra Farmand, Maggie Larson, David Ostow, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Drew Panckeri, Colin Tom

Below: a miscellany from the exhibit (group photo above courtesy of Jeremy Nguyen. All other photos courtesy of Elizabeth Dickson).  My thanks to Ms. Dickson, Lars Kenseth, Mr. Nguyen, and Mitra Farmand for their assistance.

 

 

Event of Interest: Not OK: Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough; Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings; Next Week’s New Yorker Cover Revealed

Event of Interest: Not OK: Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough

What fun!  An exhibit of cartoons that did not make the cut at The New Yorker. Many of the contributing artists are newbies at the magazine, either in the print version and/or on the magazine’s website.

“Not OK” refers to the two letters every New Yorker cartoonist (and every prospective New Yorker cartoonist) longs to see in her or his inbox at week’s end in an email from the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor: OK (or sometimes: O.K.).  An OKed cartoon is a drawing that has been bought by The New Yorker. The Not OK show is comprised of selected drawings submitted to the magazine but not bought. 

Here’s a list of the participants:

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Mitra Farmand, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Lars Kenseth, Amy Kurzweil, Maggie Larson, Sharon Isadora Levy, Brendan Loper, Sam Marlow, Jeremy Nguyen, David Ostow, Drew Panckeri, Ellis Rosen, Julia Suits, Colin Tom

For more info on these artists please consult the Spill’s A-Z or the personal websites of each cartoonist.

Day, time  & place:

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Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings

The CC boys are back (sans Mystery Cartoonist!) with a look at this week’s cartoons. I particularly enjoyed their dissection of Jeremy Nguyen’s Picasso cartoon.  Go here to see what they have to say about that drawing and all the others in the issue.

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Next Week’s New Yorker Cover Revealed

It’s become somewhat routine these days for the New Yorker to allow us a look at the upcoming issue’s cover, most especially if the cover is tied-in to current events. Here’s the cover artist, Eric Drooker, talking (very briefly)  about his cover for the September 18th issue. And here’s Mr. Drooker talking about it a little more to The Washington Post’s Michael Cavna.