James Thurber: “What Do You People Really Want, Anyway?”

Last Sunday the 6th New Yorker Album was in this spot — today it’s The 5th New Yorker Album, published in 1932. It’s a heck of a lot of fun to look through and it has a bonus: the Foreward is by James Thurber. In 1932 he was in top form as a cartoonist and writer, as well as one of the magazine’s stars. Rereading his Foreword this rainy Fall morning I found parts of it touchingly relevant.

Here’s how it opens: 

“What do you people really want, anyway?” is awfully funny.  It makes me think of the many many comments I’ve read on the New Yorker‘s Facebook pages (its flagship page and its off-shoot New Yorker Cartoons page).  My guess is that every single New Yorker cartoon posted online receives varying proportions of praise and condemnation, validating for the zillionth time the oldie but goodie cliche, “Everyone has an opinion.”

Last year I was asked by Gil Roth on his Virtual Memories podcast, “What is a New Yorker cartoon?” and my answer (after freezing a moment) was something like “It’s whatever the editors (at the time) think is a New Yorker cartoon.” In other words, there’s no set of rules, regulations, guidelines and requirements posted on one of the magazine’s walls. How boring would that be. It would also be the death of the magazine’s cartoons. Thurber addresses this in his foreword:

Thurber sums up his Foreword perfectly.  Perfectly for 1932, and perfectly for now and tomorrow at The New Yorker:

Some notes about the 5th Album: the album itself is somewhat more difficult to find than most of the others. Finding it with a dust jacket is even more of a challenge.  This was the final Album missing from the Spill’s set of dust-jacketed New Yorker Albums.  Some years back two generous individuals helped fill the gap.  I’m indebted to Edward Sorel for finding a copy (sans dust jacket) for the Spill’s archives and equally indebted to Chris Wheeler for donating the dust jacket of his copy to the Spill’s archives.

The cover of the Album, by Julian De Miskey, was originally the New Yorker cover for the issue of April 2, 1932:

Here’s the only text appearing elsewhere on the dust jacket other than the cover and spine; it’s on the inside front flap.  The back cover is blank, as is the back inside flap.

 

 

 

Lists! New Yorker Cartoon Collections & Artists; Latest New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue

It will come as no surprise to Ink Spill visitors that I enjoy lists. “The New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” on this site being one example — the Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists Library” being another. I’ve been a fan of Chris Wheeler’s great website for years (he has been a generous contributor to the Spill’s archive).  Here are two links for New Yorker cartoon afficianados who like things orderly.  James Peterson has posted a list of New Yorker books (collections of cartoons)  as well as a list of New Yorker artists.

About the photo above: I don’t usually stack the Spill‘s collection of New Yorker Albums like that — it would be criminal to do so.  This was a one-time thing. After photographing them, I returned the albums to the safety of a horizontal shelf. If the New Yorker publishes an anthology to celebrate the magazine’s 100th birthday in 2025 — and I can’t imagine they won’t —  I’ll momentarily pile up the albums again and add the new book on the bottom.

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Latest New Yorker State of Mind Post

This particular post, looking at the issue of July 7, 1928, is chock full of cartoons, and as usual, so much more (there’s also a much appreciated shout-out to the Spill).  Read it here.

Liza Donnelly: Live-Drawing the Dems Historic Convention; E. Simms Campbell Spotlighted

 

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From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk, July 29, 2016 “Live-Drawing Hillary’s Historic Convention” — Liza Donnelly’s graphic account of her four days at the Democratic Convention.

As mentioned earlier this week on the Spill, Ms. Donnelly  spent the week embedded with CBS News in Philadelphia, drawing on-set, and in and around the convention hall. You can see some of her work here and a short video here.  Also follow Ms. Donnelly on Twitter @lizadonnelly for her latest drawings.

Below: Ms. Donnelly, second from left, with the CBS This Morning news team, Norah O’ Donnell, Charlie Rose and Gayle King,  in Philadelphia, July 28 2016.

L at DNC w: CBS This Morning News team July 28 2016

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From 1,001 Chicago Afternoons, July 27, 2016, “Cuties and The Englewood Cartoonist” this short piece on E. Simms Campbell.  Here’s  Mr. Cambell’s entry on Ink Spill’s A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell  (photo above)  Born, 1906. Died, 1971.  NYer work: 1932 -1942. Key  collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist; More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

For more information, go here to Chris Wheeler’s fabulous website to see Mr. Campbell’s cartoon collections.