Video: Paul Noth; Eli Stein celebrates Al Ross’s 100th; New Book: a Wolcott Gibbs anthology

From a blog by Peter McGraw, October 26, 2011, “Will these cartoons be funny in other countries?” – this post, including a short video of an interview with Paul Noth

 

From Eli Stein’s website, “We All Have to Start Somewhere Dept. Case in Point #16,” this post featuring work by Al Ross

 

From Salon, October 21, 2001, “The New Yorker writer that time forgot,” this review of a Wolcott Gibbs anthology, Backward Ran Sentences

[ in the earliest days of The New Yorker, Gibbs, as Katharine White’s assistant, was  given the sometimes unenviable task of hand holder, which meant talking to the artists, sending them notes, handing them rejections, etc..

Charles Addams fans might remember that Addams illustrated several book jackets for Gibbs, including Season in the Sun (Random House, 1951) and More in Sorrow (Holt, 1958) ]

Posted Note: Cartoon Library

 

A few years ago I put up eight foot long by eight foot high bookshelves exclusively devoted to holding the sprawling collection of cartoon books my wife (and fellow cartoonist) Liza Donnelly, and I have collected over the years. Before the cartoon library wall of shelves went up, our cartoon collection was here and there throughout the house, in piles on various shelves.  It might take twenty minutes to find a desired book, or it might never happen.

 

Once the shelves were up, and the shelving of books began, it became obvious that the cartoon library wouldn’t be the place to go for cartoon books in our home –- it was just another place to go.

 

What I didn’t realize was that I was reluctant to remove favorite cartoon collections from my work room. Most of these books have been at arm’s reach my entire cartoon working life – they had to stay put (included among the within reach books: certain titles by Thurber, Addams, Peter Arno, Steinberg, and Soglow).  Our Thurber collection had to stay nearby my work room, on bookshelves in our living room.  So did our small collection of graphic novels and comic book anthologies.

 

In the last few months I’ve taken certain books out of the cartoon library, and brought them back closer to my desk.  The most recent transfer was Superman: The Complete History by Les Daniels.  I love its cover – a blow up of the early Superman. One of these days Daniel’s companion volume, Batman: The Complete History will be retrieved from the library.   As there’s no space left on any of the shelves in my room, it will have to rest on top of the Superman book, in a pile.