Lists! New Yorker Cartoon Collections & Artists; Latest New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue

It will come as no surprise to Ink Spill visitors that I enjoy lists. “The New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” on this site being one example — the Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists Library” being another. I’ve been a fan of Chris Wheeler’s great website for years (he has been a generous contributor to the Spill’s archive).  Here are two links for New Yorker cartoon afficianados who like things orderly.  James Peterson has posted a list of New Yorker books (collections of cartoons)  as well as a list of New Yorker artists.

About the photo above: I don’t usually stack the Spill‘s collection of New Yorker Albums like that — it would be criminal to do so.  This was a one-time thing. After photographing them, I returned the albums to the safety of a horizontal shelf. If the New Yorker publishes an anthology to celebrate the magazine’s 100th birthday in 2025 — and I can’t imagine they won’t —  I’ll momentarily pile up the albums again and add the new book on the bottom.

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Latest New Yorker State of Mind Post

This particular post, looking at the issue of July 7, 1928, is chock full of cartoons, and as usual, so much more (there’s also a much appreciated shout-out to the Spill).  Read it here.

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt. 17: Sam Cobean

No New Yorker cartoonist milked the humorous possibilities of (mostly female) total nudity like the late Sam Cobean (an example above), but you wouldn’t know it by the ads below. Mr. Cobean’s two collections, Cobean’s Naked Eye, and The Cartoons of Cobean (arranged and selected by Steinberg, with an Introduction by Mr. Cobean’s good friend, Charles Addams, published posthumously) are easily found online (Abebooks is a reliable destination). 

These ads, like every other part of this series (save the Absolut ads) were provided by the Executive Director of SPX, Warren Bernard. My continued thanks to Mr. Bernard for his generosity.

Ad dates:  top row, both 1946. Bottom row, left: 1948. Zippo ad: 1950

 

 

Mr. Cobean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z

 

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. New Yorker work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/

Cartoon Companion’s Amy Hwang Interview (Pt.1); Columbia University Libraries’ “Comics In the Curriculum”; The Tilley Watch:The New Yorker Festival

Cartoon Companion’s Amy Hwang Interview (Pt.1)

Cartoon Companion has expanded its features, offering glimpses of rough drawings and interviews with New Yorker cartoonists.  Here’s the latest with Amy Hwang, who began contributing to the magazine in November of 2010.  Link here to her website.

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Columbia Universities Libraries’ “Comics in the Curriculum”

Karen Green, over at Columbia University, has been busy busy busy these past many years building a comics collection.  Read about “Comics in the Curriculum” here and take a look at the work.

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Here’s a link to all the New Yorker Festival events.

As of now (and unless other events are added) there is no cartoon or cartoonist-specific event this year.  However, the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen will be in  conversation with comedian Kumail Nanjiani,  the art editor Francoise Mouly will be speaking with cover artist, Barry Blitt (he has a new book coming out) and there’ll be an event with television’s Pete Holmes

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of September 11, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

We’ve come to expect, in these modern New Yorker times, that the cover will likely be a graphic comment on the biggest news of the week, and so it is with this new issue, featuring Chris Ware’s reflection on Hurricane Harvey. On a week like this it’s not really a surprise what the magazine’s cover will be about — the only question is, who will have the cover. Selfishly, I would love to see what other artists had submitted (perhaps the magazine will provide a slide show?).

And now on to the issue’s cartoons. First, of course, we must page through the Goings On About Town (GOAT) section. As a sidebar, I clearly recall looking through the first copies of The New Yorker I found when I began collecting older issues (by older, I mean issues from the magazine’s earliest decades). A read through GOAT in those issues was (and can still be) a form of time travel. For instance: in the After Theater Entertainment listed in the issue of November 15, 1930 there’s this:

Grill Neptune, Hotel Pierre, 5 Ave. at 61. (Regent 5901) –- A new and unusual room for supper dancing. For the more fastidious. Must dress.

Wow, Peter Arno’s Manhattan did exist, once.

This morning, with my mission quite clear, there’s no time to pause to see what’s happening at the Metropolitan Museum, and yet, sheepishly, I do stop at the full page ad for Zabar’s. For a brief moment, I wish I was a hundred feet from the entrance to Zabar’s instead of a hundred miles away.

Onward to the Talk of The Town — there’ll be a Spill “Posted Note” one day soon about Rea Irvin’s classic masthead — and to the first cartoon ( like last week’s issue, it doesn’t take very long to come upon: page 28). The cartoon is by newish-comer Jeremy Nguyen (recently a subject of Jane Mattimoe’s Case for Pencils blog). It opens up a whole new situation for cartoonists to mine: artists in cages. Mr. Nguyen’s first cartoon appeared in the magazine February 7, 2017.

Flipping through to the next cartoon I can’t help but notice a Personal History piece by  Calvin Trillin (now in his 54th year of contributing to The New Yorker).  Note to myself: read later! Several pages later is a John McNamee Garden of Eden drawing. Mr. McNamee’s first New Yorker work appeared in June of 2016, unless the magazine’s search function is mistaken.  I’ve just realized Mr. McNamee is not on The Spill’s A-Z.  My only excuse is that his work appeared in the year when more new cartoonists appeared (16) in The New Yorker than in any other year in modern times. Things were a little nutty then. [I just added his name. Again, my apologies to Mr. McNamee].  Here’s the Case For Pencils post on him and his tools of the trade.

Seven pages later we come upon an Amy Kurzweil drawing nicely situated in the upper right hand corner of the page. Ms. Kurzweil’s graphic memoir, Flying Couch  (Black Balloon Publishing, 2016) was a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice.  In this issue  she visits one of the cartoonist’s tried-and-true situations: the boardroom. I’ve scurried around my memory library for sterling boardroom cartoons and two immediately came to mind, but I’ll mention just one, by the late great Charles Saxon,  published May 25, 1981. “Of course, honesty is one of the better policies.” (also the title of a wonderful 1984 collection of his work).

Five pages later is another standard situation and character utilized by scores of cartoonists: the King on his throne (I’ve done way more than my share).  The curtains In this drawing vaguely remind me of this classic scene from Monty Python’s Holy GrailThe cartoonist, Kaamran Hafeez, first published in The New Yorker in 2010 (you can see his work on the Cartoon Bank site here). For me, Mr. Hafeez’s cartoon (both the setting and the caption itself) is, in a way, a step-child to many drawn by master cartoonist,  Dana Fradon over his long New Yorker career (Mr. Fradon, now in his 90s, is still drawing and occasionally posting the drawings on social media).

Four pages later is a well-placed Tom Chitty drawing of two businessmen. The anatomy here reminded me of those plastic cowboys from the 1950s or 1960s who were designed to sit on a plastic horse.

Mr. Chitty’s work began appearing in the magazine, October 13, 2014.

Three pages later, a Barbara Smaller back-to-school drawing sans Smaller people(!).  Ms. Smaller’s first cartoon appeared in the magazine in 1996. (Ms. Smaller’s work can be found on the Cartoon Bank site). A few pages later is a Robert Leighton drawing that takes place at some sort of event that involves a dais.  It’s fun when a cartoonist widens the scene and gives us a lot to look at. Mr. Leighton’s first drawing in the magazine: 2002. (See his work on the CB site). 

Next up is Liana Finck drawing.  I appreciate the Thurberesque framed piece Ms. Finck has placed on the wall and the electrical socket near the floor. Somewhere in my research for the Arno biography I ran across a cartoonist discussing how, in ancient times at the magazine, certain cartoonists were allowed or not allowed to show plugged-in lamps, depending on their abilities (or was it seniority?). Thanks to Thurber’s influence,  I’ve always drawn sockets and plugged in my lamps — how else would they work?  Ms. Finck’s work first appeared in February of 2013 (visit the Cartoon Bank site to see more).

After a page-and-a-half color politically-themed spread (called a”Sketchbook” on The Table of Contents) by the great Edward Sorel, we come to a Will McPhail drawing based on the ever popular Whac-A-Mole.  I did not know, until this moment that Whac-A-Mole was invented in 1975.  An unscientific survey of Whac-A-Moles images show most moles with their mouths closed.  Mr. McPhail’s mole’s mouth is open, suggesting the mole is speaking. I suppose that makes sense as the seated fellow pictured is trying to understand the mole. How I wish I knew what the mole was saying. (Link here to Mr. McPhail’s website.  His first New Yorker appearance was in 2014).

Immediately following Mr. McPhail’s mole drawing is a beautifully placed color piece by Roz Chast with a political twist.  Ms. Chast’s work first appeared in the New Yorker in 1978. Five pages later is a full page Ed Steed piece about the eclipse.  Responding to this piece just graphically, it seems like a page out of The National Lampoon (sort of a graphic mixture of Mark Marek‘s work with Randall Enos’s and Charles Rodrigues’s). Mr. Steed’s work first appeared in The New Yorker in March of 2013.  You can see more here on the Cartoon Bank site.

Five pages later is an Avi Steinberg drawing incorporating boxing and music. My personal laugh-o-meter responds well to this drawing even though the “kid” looks like he’s well past a career in boxing. Mr. Steinberg’s work first appeared in the magazine in December of 2012. His work can be found on the CB site.

In the final cartoon of the issue, not counting the Cartoon Caption Contest work on the back page, is a David Sipress drawing (first New Yorker cartoon: 1998…see his work on the CB here). Mr. Sipress mashes tennis with Shakespeare. The caption immediately  takes me away from the tennis court to the televised court of public opinion, to the  McCarthy era and to William R. Murrow’s famous use of the line.  None of that had anything to do with tennis, but then again — and here we return to Mr. Ware’s Hurricane Harvey cover — everything is political. 

 — See you next Monday.

 

 

 

New Site of Interest: Weekly Humorist

There’s a relatively new humor site in town: Weekly Humorist, featuring cartoons, humorous writing and podcasts. The WH’s Publisher, Marty Dundics tells the Spill that he’s “…launching a digital tablet weekly issue soon and the site, which has a lot of articles and cartoons from contributors from New Yorker/Shouts & Murmurs, MAD, American Bystander, Funny or Die, McSweeny’s, NY Times, WSJ etc…

…Our tagline is The Satire Magazine. The standard in American immaturity.”

Visit the Weekly Humorist site here!

 

Two Blog Posts of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind & Attempted Bloggery

Two favorite New Yorker-related blogs making for fun Saturday reading.

First, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker with its look at the issue of June 30, 1928 featuring the ever pleasing work of Helen Hokinson on the cover. Work shown in the post: Alice Harvey, Al Frueh, and Peter Arno. 

And then there’s Attempted Bloggery, frequently mentioned on the Spill, and for good reason. Stephen Nadler, who runs the site, tirelessly examines all kinds of New Yorker cartoon and cartoonist related angles (original art, auctions, obscurities, etc). Right now he’s looking at the work of Gregory d’Alessio, a somewhat forgotten figure.  Mr. d’Alessio contributed a handful of covers and one cartoon to The New Yorker

Shown above: on the left is the June 30, 1928 New Yorker. On the right, a drawing by Mr. d’Alessio from the May 1937 issue of College Humor.

The Spill’s A-Z entries for cartoonists mentioned:

Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

Gregory d’Alessio (Photo above from College Humor, 1938) Born Sept. 25, 1904, NYC. New Yorker work: 1934 -1940.

Al Frueh (pictured above) Born, Lima, Ohio 1880; died, Sharon, Connecticut, 1968. New Yorker work: 1925 – 1962. Here’s a good piece about Mr. Frueh’s life.

 

 

 

Alice Harvey  (above) Born 1894, Austin, Illinois. New Yorker work: Oct. 17th,1925 – May 1, 1943.

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)