New Yorker Cartoonists Exhibit Way Out West

 

 This promises to be an interesting exhibit (see the poster for all the pertinent information). According to the show’s promotional material: “Rejected works handpicked by each artist will be shown alongside originals that ran in the magazine.”  Keeping my fingers crossed that this exhibit makes its way east.

The poster above features a Bob Eckstein drawing.  Also circulating online are at least four other posters, two with drawings by Carolita Johnson, and solos by Emily Flake and Shannon Wheeler.  Collect them all!:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Steiner illustrates; Mark Singer on Edward Koren’s 50th anniversary; Aline-Kominsky Crumb @ MoCCA; Fiction Writers Review blog adds cartoons; Addams Family costumes; Science Cracking the Humor Code?; Audio interview: Liza Donnelly; Mankoff & Co. on dreamed cartoons

 

From Speaker System, “10 1/2 Things No Commencement Speaker Has Ever Said” (W. W. Norton & Co.) This new book by Charles Wheelan is illustrated by the one and only Peter Steiner.  Visit your neighborhood online book seller for a peek inside.

 

From newyorker.com, June 1, 2012, “Ed Koren Arrives” — Mark Singer on Mr. Koren’s 50th anniversary at The New Yorker.  (a slideshow accompanies the post).

 

 

From Omnicomic, May 31, 2012, “MoCCA Gets a Miami Makeover” Aline Kominsky-Crumb collaborates with Dominique Sapel (exhibit opens June 14th).

 

From Fiction Writers Review, June 1, 2012, “The Flyleaf” — with an inaugural cartoon by Tom Toro


From Costume Direct, some semi-familiar garb

 

From The Huffington Post, May 31, 2012, “Should Science Crack the Humor Code?” (with Steinberg content)

 

From Tall Tale Radio, May 24, 2012, this audio interview with Liza Donnelly

 

From newyorker.com., May 31, 2012, “In Dreams Begin Cartoons”Bob Mankoff (with a little help from Sam Cobean, Robert Leighton, Joe Dator, and Kaamran Hafeez ) explores the relationship between zzzzzs and cartoons.

New Yorker Cartoons & war

Pictured above:  a handful of World War II era publications from The New Yorker. Beginning at twelve o’clock high, with the red cover is The New Yorker Cartoons with The Talk of The Town (1945) — it’s the hard cover version of the New Yorker booklet to the left (cover by Alajalov). This is an exciting publication, chock full of great work.  The Introduction is by New Yorker writer Russell Maloney who speaks of the qualities that define a New Yorker cartoon.  Here’s an excerpt:

The editors of The New Yorker have, from the very beginning, made things just much more difficult for themselves by insisting on a closer relation between pictures and captions. In a good New Yorker drawing — and mind you, I’m saying they’re all good — the picture doesn’t mean much without a caption, and vice versa. If a picture is self explanatory without a caption, it is printed without a caption; you’ll find a good many in this volume. In The New Yorker the pictures do not illustrate the jokes; they are the jokes.


Continuing clockwise is The New Yorker War Album (cover by Peter Arno, published by Random House, 1942), then a pony edition* New Yorker (cover by Helen Hokinson), Another booklet, this one titled The New Yorker War Cartoons (cover by the ultra-prolific Alan Dunn).  The Introduction is by E.J. Kahn.  Here’s an excerpt:

 

One of the principal virtues of this collection of war cartoons is that they are not aimed at anybody in particular, unless it be the man with a capacity for absorbtion of humor…These cartoons show that a purely civilian organization can good naturedly tickle a military body without hurting any feelings.


Rounding out the collection, another pony edition (cover by James Thurber).

 

*By following the pony edition link above you’ll be taken to the From the Attic section of Ink Spill.  Scroll down to the “New Yorker Overseas 1945” post for a brief history of the The New Yorker Pony Editions