Wertz’s Sketchy Interview; Mischa Richter’s Strictly Richter

Wertz’s Sketchy Interview

Gothamist continues its Sketchy Interview series with Julia Wertz. Read it here.

Ms. Wertz first contribution to the New Yorker appeared in the issue of August 3, 2015.

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Mischa Richter”s Strictly Richter

David Pomerantz has sent along this interesting piece from 2016 about the late Mischa Richter’s strip, Strictly Richter.

A sidenote: when I interviewed Mr. Richter years ago for my Arno biography I asked him about the obvious (to me) Arno influence in his early work.  Surprisingly, Richter disavowed any influence whatsoever. 

Mr. Richter’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Mischa Richter (photo above courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon). Born, Kharkov, Russia, 1910. Died, March 23, 2001. New Yorker work: January 10, 1942 – January 20, 2003 ; Key books: This One’s On Me! (McGraw-Hill, 1945) , The Cartoonist’s Muse, co-authored by Harald Bakken (Contemporary Books, 1992).

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 18, 2018

Ah, a Father’s Day cover.

 I find this cover puzzling. The sink is dripping, yet the repair work seems to be going on under the sink.  My understanding is that a dripping faucet is repaired within the faucet itself — it’s usually just a gasket replacement. Work below the sink is reserved for clogged, damaged or leaking pipes or water lines.  As the father and daughter shown on the cover are working under the sink you might assume they are doing something along those lines — something involving the pipes or water lines.  Yet anyone working below the sink would not begin working below the sink until first turning off both the hot and cold water (which only involves reaching in under the sink and closing the water valves). Thus they would not be set to work, such as they are, below the counter with the water still running. I know, I know, lighten up, Ink Spill — it’s not an illustration from a manual describing how to fix a dripping faucet.  As a cartoonist who has only worked on dripping faucets and leaking pipes in a non-professional capacity, I admit I could be completely wrong about all of the above.

From the Department of Just Sayin’:

# of illustrations in this issue: 20 (including photographs, but not including Tom Bachtell’s wonderful drawings that appear regularly in The Talk of The Town).  5 of the illustrations are full page.

# of cartoons  in the issue: 14 (none are full page).

As in previous weeks, I’m not going to go cartoon-by-cartoon, but will instead note a few.

Interesting that for two of the cartoons the humor involves walking through or onto something.  That is to say, the act of walking itself is the core of the drawing.  In Julia Suits cartoon (p.16), a  blindfolded fellow is being led to step onto an upturned rake. Ka-pow, right?  In Will McPhail’s drawing (p.39), a just arriving visiting couple will momentarily walk through hot coals. Ouch!

  The New Yorker cartoon subway series is back after a hiatus; this week’s subterranean drawing courtesy of Roz Chast (page 34). 

 The Spill does not rate cartoons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion, but it does applaud exceptional work, such as Joe Dator’s drawing (p.21) and Bruce Kaplan’s tight graphic treat (p.42).

Finally, as has been the case for just over a year now, I’m showing Rea Irvin’s spectacular Talk of the Town masthead.  Why show it?  Because it was replaced last spring by a look-alike.  To read a Spill piece about Mr. Irvin’s drawing and its unnecessary replacement, link here.

Here’s the real thing:

To see all of the cartoons in this issue, link here and scroll down to the slideshow, “Cartoons from the Issue”

— See you next week

 

 

 

 

 

The Deluxe New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons: A Few Details

A photo (above) and a few details (below) have been posted about the $800.00 deluxe edition of the upcoming The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (Blackdog & Leventhal):

“With a limited printing of 1,000 copies, this Deluxe edition of THE NEW YORKER ENCYCLOPEDIA OF CARTOONS features 3 signed, numbered limited edition prints in individual portfolios, one each by famed artists Robert Mankoff, Bruce Eric Kaplan, and Roz Chast.”

(my thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for bringing this to my attention).

The Tilley Watch Online, June 4-8, 2018; Jason Chatfield: Trying to Get a New Yorker Cartoon

As usual, ’twas mostly a Trump week on the Daily, with cartoons by Darrin Bell (two appearances), Peter Kuper, Ed Steed, and Maddie Dai (the one non-Trumpian drawing). There was a team effort by Brendan Loper and Jeremy Nguyen.

Over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonist was Liana Finck.

To see all of the above work, and more, link here.

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A Quest to Get a New Yorker Cartoon

From The Walkley Magazine, “‘Is there something in this?’ — The quest of two Aussies to get a cartoon in the New Yorker” — this piece with Jason Chatfield content.  

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Addams New Yorker Penguins Cover Sells for $30K

Charles Addams New Yorker cover for the September 12 1977 issue sold for $30,000 at last night’s Swann Galleries auction.  For a look at the art listed, go here.

Here’s the penguin cover as it appeared as a cover:

Here’s Mr. Addams’ entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932–1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/