The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 27th, 2018

  Kadir Nelson‘s cover (a tribute to Aretha Franklin) was posted last week.  Not mentioned here at the time (but noted on the New Yorker‘s Table of Contents): the image was inspired by Charles W. White’s Folksinger. 

The new issue’s “Fall Preview” accounts for the abundance of arts ads and illustrations. 

The cartoons:

Now we’re talkin’: sixteen cartoons in this issue vs last week’s nine.  A number of the sixteen cartoons stand out for various reasons. Two of them (I won’t single them out) are beyond me. Not long ago I would’ve emailed Jack Ziegler to explain them to me. It was always comforting when Jack didn’t understand a drawing either. Often he’d respond with a variation of, “I don’t know what the hell it means.”

 Now for some others that stood out (these I understand): Seth Fleishman‘s mirror ball drawing cements his reputation as the New Yorker‘s mirror ball guy. Funny drawing. Also very funny: Joe Dator‘s “hunny” sniffing Pooh airport scenario. And then there’s David Borchart‘s sea-faring koala drawing. Oh my my my. I mentioned Jack Ziegler before. I think Jack would’ve loved these drawings — they’re wonderfully in his ballpark of way-out-there. A Spill round of applause.

A thought here about the placement of every cartoon in the issue: none seemed pressed for space, in need of breathing room. Victoria Roberts doctor’s office drawing (p.69) and Ellis Rosen‘s (p.42) are good examples. The reader can really enjoy the fine drawing going on in these pieces (and in others).

This issue includes the debut New Yorker cartoon by Caitlin Cass. Ms. Cass is the seventeenth new cartoonist brought in since cartoon editor, Emma Allen was appointed in the Spring of 2017. Ms. Cass’s style — mostly the way she handles faces — reminds me of a New Yorker cover artist from the Golden Age: Christina Malman.  Oddly enough, while looking through Ms. Malman’s twenty-four covers for the magazine I came across one (shown below) thematically linked to Ms. Cass’s drawing of children looking at art in a museum.

A final thought before Rea Irvin’s classic missing masthead shows up at the end of this post: I’m wondering if Emma Hunsinger‘s funny caption for her drawing on page 77 would’ve also worked if the word “aren’t” was “are”…and if that’s so — if it’s so how often it happens in cartoon captions that a word completely flipped can still work with the drawing. In this case, substituting “are” for “aren’t” would radically change the intent. Ms. Hunsinger’s use of the word “aren’t” suggests the parents are concerned their child’s behavior is unusual. By using “are” the parents would instead be hopeful that their child’s behavior might make for a viral video.

For the record, here is the list of cartoonists in this issue:

And now, as promised, the missing Irvin masthead.

 — See you next week

 

 

 

Attempted Bloggery and Amazon and The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons; Ellis Rosen’s New Digs; Liza Donnelly Reflects on Kofi Annan & Cartoons

Attempted Bloggery and Amazon and The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

An Ink Spill favorite site, Attempted Bloggery, recounts an Amazonian wild goose chase for a slashed price copy of the upcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons Read it here

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New Yorker Cartoonists & Real Estate: Ellis Rosen

From time-to-time the Spill has mentioned articles featuring homes of New Yorker cartoonists. Here’s  the New York Times, August 16, 2018 with a look at Ellis Rosen’s:  “It Took A Village To Make Their Perfect Home”

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Liza Donnelly: Kofi Annan Loved Cartoons

From Medium, this reflection by Liza Donnelly.

Above: Mr. Annan with an international gathering of cartoonists at the United Nations, with Ms. Donnelly back row, center.

The Tilley Watch Online, the Week of August 13-17; Video of Interest: A BBC Portrait of Liza Donnelly; Blog of Interest: New Yorker State of Mind

The contributing New Yorker cartoonists* on this week’s Daily Cartoon: Jeremy Nguyen, Avi Steinberg, Lars Kenseth, and Jason Adam Katzenstein  (3/4ths of the drawings in the realm of Trump).

Contributing New Yorker cartoonists on this week’s Daily Shouts (team efforts all): Olivia de Recat (w/Chris Weller), Jeremy Nguyen (w/Chris Kozminski), and Jason Adam Katzenstein (w/Julia Edelman).

*The Spill considers “contributing New Yorker cartoonists” cartoonists whose work has appeared in the print edition of the New Yorker

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Video of Interest: A BBC Portrait of Liza Donnelly

From the BBC, “Drawing For Change: Liza Donnelly” — this recent profile of Ms. Donnelly,

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

The Spill applauds one of its favorite blogs, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine. The latest post looks closely at the last issues of the last summer of the 1920s. This is a terrific read. 

Fave Photo of the Day: Cartoonists Celebrate Sam Gross’s Birthday; Early Release: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Cartoon Companion Dissects the Very Latest New Yorker Cartoons

Fave Photo of the Day: Cartoonists Celebrate Sam Gross’s Birthday

Cartoonists gathered on Manhattan’s upper east side on Thursday to celebrate Cartoon God, Sam Gross, who turned 85 on August 7th.  Clockwise from the lower left: Robert Leighton, Bob Eckstein, Maria Scrivan, Nick Downes, Marisa Acocella, Sam Gross, Roz Chast, and Tracey Berglund. 

–photo courtesy of Bob Eckstein

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Early Release: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Read what Kadir Nelson, the cover artist for next week’s issue, had to say about his Aretha Franklin tribute.

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Cartoon Companion Dissects the Very Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC boys are back with their ratings for this week’s cartoons (the issue of August 20th).  Julia Suits was awarded the CC‘s Top Toon ribbon. Read it all here!

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 20, 2018

Seems like a long long time since there was a Monday Tilley Watch (it wasn’t really that long; must’ve been the endless Summer days making the stretch seem more stretched out).  The cover of the new issue is messagey — you can read what the cover artist, R. Kikuo Johnson, had in mind here.

Worth noting there’s gender equality, cartoonist numbers-wise, in this issue.  Also of note, and maybe this was purely expectation on my part of a barrel full of cartoons greeting us this week: there are but nine single panel cartoons in the issue (there’s a full page drawing provided by Roz Chast).  

This will be the last week I note the number of illustrations appearing vs the number of cartoons as it seems to be the norm now that illustrations outnumber cartoons, both in actual number and in space given in the magazine’s pages.  

Also ending this week, I will no longer mention that Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead is missing. I will however, continue to post his masthead (on Mondays) until I’m told by someone with clout to cease. 

One cartoon in this issue has caused me to continue thinking about it longer than I would usually think about a specific cartoon. That’s either a good thing, or a bad thing.  In this case it’s a good thing.  The P.C. Vey drawing (on page 22) of a couple in a kitchen alongside a loose change machine made me think of Charles Addams’ work (always a pleasant diversion). It’s in the Addams mode, yet it’s also very much in the Vey mode. My thinking is that Addams might’ve handled it in some other way — perhaps the machine would’ve been out on the street(?). Perhaps the cup holders would’ve been less economically well-off(?). This splendid drawing has done its job just the way it is, but it also allows for some fun cartoon speculation.  It deserves a round of Spill applause.  

   

And here’s Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead, not for the last time. Read about it here:

Note: for the next week or so the Spill will appear irregularly.  It’ll be back on track by the beginning of September.