Liza Donnelly to Live Draw at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liza Donnelly announced on social media this morning that she’ll  be live drawing at tonight’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner (in her capacity as the CBS News Resident Cartoonist).  This is possibly another first for a cartoonist in a line of firsts for Ms. Donnelly (the others: live-drawing on the Oscars Red Carpet, and more recently, live-drawing at the White House Press Briefing Room).

Link here to Liza Donnelly’s website (where you’ll find a link to her New Yorker work)

New Yorker Cartoons Golden Age Editor; Roz Chast in San Francisco; More Spills with Nguyen, Rosen, Eckstein, Flake, Finck, Donnelly and Arno

 

 

 

 

Rounding out this historic week for New Yorker cartoons and cartoonists as we say “Goodbye” to Bob Mankoff and “Hello” to Emma Allen is an article from the early 1970s as another transition was about to take place: long-time New Yorker Art Editor, James Geraghty  was beginning to think retirement, but his successor was not yet in place (the successor would be Lee Lorenz). See the Geraghty article here at Attempted Bloggery

________________________________________________________________________________

Roz Chast was recently out west for the opening of the traveling exhibit “Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs”– here’s a brief interview with her from The Jewish News of California, posted April 26th, 2017: “Life’s Funny Like That: New Yorker Cartoonist’s Memoir on Exhibit at CJM”

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Jeremy Nguyen and Ellis Rosen will be unveiling their rejected cartoons at the Downtown Variety Hour on May 1st. Details here. ________________________________________________________________________________

My favorite snowman expert, Bob Eckstein, has been out in the Windy City on a Spring tour promoting his lovely new book, Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores Here’s a short interview with him from The Chicago Tribune.

________________________________________________________________________________

…A reminder  that the upcoming Pen World Voices Festival of International Literature will present  Women In Ink, with a boffo panel featuring Emily Flake, Roz Chast, Liana Finck, and Rayma Suprani. Liza Donnelly will moderate. Details here.

 

______________________________________________________________________________

Finally, for those who enjoy the obscure: the Swann Galleries has a 1932 Peter Arno poster up for auction on May 25th.  A beauty! Details here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Lorenz’s “Art of The New Yorker” Recalled; Cartoonists Sign In

 

 

 

Attempted Bloggery is sticking with a theme this transitional week at the New Yorker (the cartoon editorship will be Emma Allen’s responsibility beginning next week):  reminders, via New York Times articles, of past New Yorker art/cartoon editors (and one art supervisor). Today it’s a review of Lee Lorenz’s The Art of The New Yorker: 1925 – 1995.  See the post here.

Here’s Lee Lorenz’s entry on the Spill’s New Yorker Cartoons A-Z:

Lee Lorenz   Born 1932, Hackensack, New Jersey.  Mr. Lorenz was the art editor of The New Yorker from 1973 to 1993 and its cartoon editor until 1997. During his tenure, a new wave of New Yorker cartoonists began appearing in the magazine — cartoonists who no longer depended on idea men. Cartoon collections: Here It Comes (Bobbs-Merrrill Co., Inc. 1968) ; Now Look What You’ve Done! (Pantheon, 1977) ; The Golden Age of Trash ( Chronicle Books, 1987); The Essential series, all published by Workman: : Booth (pub: 1998), Barsotti ( pub: 1998), Ziegler (pub: 2001), The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, (Knopf, 1995), The World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998). New Yorker work: 1958 – .

______________________________________________________________________________

CARTOONISTS SIGN IN

Continuing on in the transition mode, yesterday was Bob Mankoff’s last “Look Day” (the day the cartoon editor actually looks at work brought into the office).  A number of folks showed up in the office to mark the occasion; some were veteran contributors (such as George Booth, Sam Gross, Mick Stevens, and Sid Harris), some were newish contributors (relatively speaking compared to say, Sam Gross or Mr. Booth who began contributing in 1969); some brand new contributors,  and some who would like to become contributors. 

Social media sites were filled with photos of the gathering, but I think the most emblematic image of the day is the sign-up sheet (also widely shown on social media).  The sign-up sheet is a relatively new addition to the magazine’s overflowing barrel of traditions, instituted to insure orderliness as to who sees the editor when  — somewhat like the ticket machines at deli counters. So here’s yesterday’s sign-up sheet.  I’ve provided a key to the names below. If the name is Bolded Blue, the artist had been published in The New Yorker pre- MankoffIf the name is Bolded Pink, they were brought in during Mr. Mankoff’s stint as cartoon editor.  If the name is not bolded the person has not been published in the magazine (anyone out there who can help with the names I simply couldn’t decipher, please contact me. As always, corrections welcome).

  1st Column:

Liana Finck, John Hamm, Maggie Jane Larson, Jeremy Nguyen, Mort Gerberg, Christian Lowe, Ellis Rosen, John Leavitt, Joe Dator, Harry Bliss, David Borchart, Fernando Amis, Dan Roe, Brendan ?, William Haefeli, Isabella Bannerman, Maria Scrivan, Ben Schwartz, Trevor Hoey, Corey Pandolph, ?, (Ellis Rosen was listed, but scratched from the line-up, then returned)

2nd Column:

Neil Dvorak, Amy Kurzweil, Paul Kleba, ?, Sam Gross, Tim Hamilton, Mick Stevens, Paul Noth, Tom Hachtman, Sean O’Neill, Trevor Spaulding, Jason Katzenstein, Sidney Harris, Colin Tom, Avi Steinberg, Jason Chatfield, Mitra Farmand, Matthew Young, Eric Lewis, Chris Weyant

3rd Column:

Pat Byrnes, George Booth, Chris Cater, Sara Lautman, ?,  Alice Cheng, Andrew Boyd & Katie Peyton,Drew Dernavich, Samuel Ferri, Emily Flake, Felipe Galindo, Kendra Allenby, Jonny Cohen, Drew Panckeri, Shannon Wheeler, Derek Brown…and, of course, The Beatles.

________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Attempted Bloggery Recalls A 20 Year Old New York Times Piece on The State of New Yorker Cartoons

As The New Yorker Cartoon Department shifts this week from one era to another (Mankoff to Allen), here’s a blast from the past: Attempted Bloggery reminds us of a long-ago New York Times piece (published June 9, 1997).

I’ve always had a fondness for this piece as it includes an amusing attack on my pie crust drawing published in the New Yorker, June 9, 1997 (you can see the cartoon in the Attempted Bloggery post).

The Passing of the Baskets

 

This week, as has been noted here, and plenty of places elsewhere, is Bob Mankoff’s last as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor.  Emma Allen, who is the magazine’s Daily Shouts editor, will become the center of the New Yorker cartoon world next week, and as such, will automatically become the focus of all existing New Yorker cartoonists and all want-to-be New Yorker cartoonists on the planet. And along with all the perks and pecks of being cartoon editor, Ms. Allen will take the New Yorker cartoon version of the baton from Mr. Mankoff  — the baton in this case: three wire baskets —  the three most important baskets in the New Yorker cartoonists’ universe. The baskets, labeled Yes, No, and Maybe are brought to the editor’s desk every week along with a pile of submissions selected by the cartoon editor out of thousands that have come into the office.

  David Remnick, the current editor of the New Yorker, then sifts through the pile, selecting the chosen few that land in the Yes basket. These are the “OKed” drawings so valued by every cartoonist submitting to the magazine. 

In Mr. Mankoff’s twenty years, he’s carried those baskets to Mr. Remnick’s office countless times (there’s possibly or probably a log noting the date of every Art Meeting, so technically, they can be counted, but who’s counting). The Yes basket has been filled and refilled hundreds of times with  the work of veteran cartoonists and over a hundred new cartoonists Mr. Mankoff brought into the magazine. A couple of years ago, when I interviewed Lee Lorenz, Mr. Mankoff’s predecessor, he told me that he felt the most important part of his job was finding new artists for the magazine. Mr. Lorenz, who held the job for twenty-four years, brought in approximately forty cartoonists (I’ll list them someday.  And note, I’m only talking about cartoonists here, not artists who were strictly cover artists).  Mr. Mankoff, whose “open door” policy made it far easier to sell a cartoon to the magazine, brought in close to one hundred and thirty (by my unofficial but not too off the mark count). Cartoon scholars will no doubt debate the ripple effects of these two schools of introducing new cartoonists. 

If Mr. Mankoff was not a cartoonist himself and the originator of the Cartoon Bank, I’d say these cartoonists he brought in were his legacy at the magazine.  But the cartoonists he brought in are surely a big part of what he leaves behind (as is how their work changed the magazine’s cartoon landscape).  And so in the spirit of wrapping things up with a nice big bow, I’m listing all of those whose work first hit the Yes basket on Mr. Mankoff’s watch (it is possible less than a handful of these cartoonists were brought in by the magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.  As always, corrections are welcome).  Ink Spill will of course carry on noting the new cartoonists brought in under Ms. Allen.  Exciting times ahead!

Cartoonists are presented in order of the year their first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker

1997: Aaron Bacall

1998: Christopher Weyant, Pat Byrnes, Nick Downes, Joe Duffy, William Haefeli, Aline Kominsky (Crumb), Marisa Acocella Marchetto, David Sipress

1999: Paul Karasik, John Caldwell, Matt Diffee, Benita Epstein, Alex Gregory, Michael Shaw, Steve Way, Robert Sikoryak, Kim Warp

2000: Ken Krimstein, Eric Lewis

2001: Chad Darbyshire, Steve Duenes, Andy Friedman (aka Larry Hat)

2002: Jonny Cohen, Drew Dernavich, Felipe Galindo ( aka feggo), Robert Leighton, Seth

2003: Donna Barstow, Erik Hilgerdt, Carolita Johnson, John Kane

2004: Marshall Hopkins, Keith Bendis, John Donohue, Glen Le Lievre, Paul Noth, Jason Patterson, Emily Richards

2005: Zach Kanin, Rob Esmay, Arthur Geisert, Sam Means, Ariel Molvig

2006: Joe Dator, Pete Holmes, Evan Forsch, Martha Gradisher, Jason Polan, Julia Suits

2007: Farley Katz, Dave Coverly, David Borchart, Caroline Dworin, Bob Eckstein, Ward Sutton

2008: Emily Flake, John Klossner, Rini Piccolo, Michael Rae Grant, Jose Arroyo, Sean O’Neill

2009: Trevor Hoey, Karen Sneider, Shannon Wheeler

2010: Amy Hwang, Kate Beaton, Isaac LittleJohn Eddy, Kaamran Hafeez, Steve Macone, Mark Thompson, Tom Toro

2011: Corey Pandolph, Jennifer Saura, Ben Schwartz, Liam Walsh

2012: Avi Steinberg, Erik Bergstrom, Rich Feldman

2013: Liana Finck, Charlie Hankin. Julian Rowe, Ed Steed

2014: Tom Chitty, Jake Goldwasser, Jason Adam Katzenstein, Will McPhail, Jacob Samuel, Trevor Spaulding, Adam Cooper & Mat Barton, Chris Cater, T.S. McCoy, Jeanne Darst & Andrew Swift, Ali Rushfield, Peter Berkowitz, Michael Kupperman

2015: Zohan Lazar, Matthew Stiles Davis, Cameron Harvey, Mitra Farmand, Drew Panckeri, Dan Roe, Tim Hamilton, Julia Wertz & Josh Wertz, Colin Tom, Tom Hamilton, Dan Abromowitz & Eli Dreyfus, Brian McLachlan, Andrew Hamm

2016: Kendra Allenby, Seth Fleishman, Darrin Bell, Kate Curtis, Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman, Brendan Loper, Christian Lowe, John McNamee, Rich Sparks, Emily Nemens, Sam Marlow, Ellis Rosen, Lars Kenseth

2017: Jeremy Nguyen, Alice Cheng, Jim Benton

Note:

  • Bolded names: these cartoonists were at one time cartoon department assistants
  • If you see two names joined by an “&” it means they worked as a team, and were acknowledged as such in the magazine’s Table of Contents.

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50 Years Ago in The New Yorker

Every so often I like to take a look at a random issue of The New Yorker from well before my time there, or well before my time, period. This issue, of April 29, 1967 is solidly in the former category. The New Yorker was not yet on my mind —  I was in fact, just about to begin transitioning out of comic books, and into underground comics. My last (non-underground) comic book bought at the time of its release was this one, Superman and The Flash, December 1970 (yes, I still have it — I don’t throw much away).

 

 

Flipping through this Spring-time issue of The New Yorker, the first thing I noticed, besides the lovely Abe Birnbaum cover, was the  very simple Table of Contents, when the magazine seemed intent on just offering up a few clues as to what was inside. No listing of artists or writers, just column headings such as “The Air” and “Current Cinema”  — we’ve come a very long way since then.

Of the seventeen cartoonists represented in this issue, not one was a woman. This was a time when only one veteran female cartoonist was still on the scene, the great Mary Petty.  But her run at the magazine had ended a year before in the issue of March 19, 1966 (she died in 1976). The next female cartoonist to show up was Nurit Karlin, and she wouldn’t begin publishing until 1974. 

These are the seventeen  cartoonists in this issue: Charles Saxon, Warren Miller, Lee Lorenz, William Hamilton, James Mulligan, Dana Fradon, William O’Brien, Edward Koren, Ton Smits, James Stevenson, Robert Kraus, Donald Reilly, J. B. “Bud” Handelsman, Carl Rose, Barney Tobey, Robert Weber, and William Steig. Many of these names will ring a bell with New Yorker cartoon aficionados, and some names will ring a very large bell.  Edward Koren and Lee Lorenz are still contributing to the magazine.  Dana Fradon and Warren Miller are still hail and hearty.  James Stevenson, Robert Weber, and William Hamilton  were among the recently departed slew of New Yorker cartoonists this past year. 

For me, the most surprising cartoonist to see  in the issue was Carl Rose (“surprising” because I unfairly tend to place his work more in the 1920s – 1940s). Mr. Rose contributed his very first cartoon to The New Yorker in the Halloween issue of 1925, when the magazine was about nine months old; his last cartoon appeared in the summer of 1971. (Below: Mr. Rose’s April ’67 drawing)

Though he had  a great run in the New Yorker,  he only published one collection, One Dozen Roses — but what a collection.

 And here, for a little more on One Dozen Roses and other noteworthy New Yorker cartoon moments in Mr. Rose’s career, I’m going to lift some of the info from his entry on the Spill‘s  “New Yorker Cartoonist A-Z” section: 

this collection contains essays by Rose on cartoon themes. Especially of interest is his essay concerning Harold Ross, “An Artist’s Best Friend is His Editor”. Carl Rose will forever be linked to E.B. White for the December 8, 1928 New Yorker cartoon of the mother saying to her child, “It’s broccoli, dear.” and the child responding, “I say it’s spinach, and I say the hell with it.” The drawing was by Rose, the caption was adapted by White from Rose’s original idea (for a slighty expanded explanation go here). Rose also had a Thurber connection. In 1932, Rose submitted a drawing captioned, “Touche!” of two fencers, one of whom has just cut off the head of the other. Harold Ross ( according to Thurber in The Years With Ross) thinking the Rose version “too bloody” suggested Thurber do the drawing because “Thurber’s people have no blood. You can put their heads back on and they’re as good as new.” The drawing appeared December 3, 1932.

One last thing about Carl Rose: there aren’t a lot of photographs of him around but when Irving Penn (whose work is now being celebrated at New York’s  Metropolitan Museum), photographed a number of The New Yorker‘s artists in 1947 for a spread in Vogue, an unassuming looking Carl Rose was right up there on the top-most platform with Otto Soglow and Alajalov, seated just behind Charles Addams. Among the others in the photo: Steinberg, Steig, Helen Hokinson, George Price, Richard Taylor, Perry Barlow, Barney Tobey,  Barbara Shermund and Whitney Darrow, Jr. —  an array, if ever there was one, of New Yorker cartoonist royalty. 

Getting back to Mr. Rose’s colleagues work appearing in the April issue, the magazine was, in 1967, still laying-out the cartoons with the graphic gusto it always had: a beautiful full page by O’Brien , an equally beautiful half-page Warren Miller drawing;  other drawings were run in various shapes and sizes.  The subject matter seemed to be bridging the older New Yorker art with the new: businessmen and housewives appear, as do people dealing with obviously modern cultural keystones such as  long-haired men and  hip young woman;  personal computers courtesy of Donald Reilly and  politics via Lee Lorenz, whose drawing depicts Robert Kennedy photo bombing a couples vacation picture. Dana Fradon’s drawing, about recharging electric cars,  could’ve run in modern times.  Needless to say (so why am I saying it?) that the issue was a blast to look through.  The cartoonists were in top form, providing us with a lot, a whole lot, to look at. As Jack Ziegler told me in an interview last year:  “…it’s always nice when cartoonists know how to draw so that they can give us something pleasant and fun to look at.”

 

 

 

Danny Shanahan’s Hudson Valley Interview; An Al Ross Sampler

Danny Shanahan, one of the best there is in the New Yorker cartoonist universe, will sit down for a rare interview and Q&A next week as part of the Hudson Valley Celebrity Series.  Info here (scroll down to the Shanahan section).

 

 

Below: An early classic Shanahan New Yorker drawing (published May 8, 1989), and one of his New Yorker covers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

____________________________________________________________________

Dick Buchanan takes a look at some mid-early work of the late great Al Ross.  You can see them all on Mike Lynch’s website here.

Al Ross’s  entry on Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

 

Al Ross Born Al Roth, Vienna Austria, October 19, 1911. Died, March 23, 2012. One of four Roth brothers, all of them cartoonists ( Ben, Salo, and Irving are the other three). NYer work: 1937- 2002. Collections: Sexcapades – The Love Life of the Modern Homo Sapiens ( Stravon Publishers, 1953), Bums vs billionaires (Dell, 1972)

 

 

 

Fave Photos of the Day: Liza Donnelly Live Drawing at The White House; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Koren; Men, Women & Cartoons

 

Fave Photo of the Day:  CBS News Resident Cartoonist and long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly  is live drawing this morning at The White House. Follow her work on @LizaDonnelly and @CBSThisMorning. Here she is drawing CBS Chief White House Correspondent, Major Garrett out on the White House lawn and the Tweeted drawing.

 

 

____________________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion returns with a look at the cartoons from The New Yorker‘s issue of April 24th 2017. The CC guys, joined, as usual by a “Mystery Cartoonist” dissect, among others,  cartoons about  bird watching, an avocado funeral, and one very large fish tank. Read it here.

_____________________________________________________________________

Here’s another piece about the one and only Edward Koren: “Shaggy Line Story” from The Commons Online.  Read it here.

 

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

From MTV News,  April 19, 2017, “New Cartoon Tuesdays: How Female Cartoonists Are Changing Mainstream Publications” — read it here

[Note: cartoon Tuesdays (or “look day”)  at The New Yorker switched to Wednesdays in recent times]

_______________________________________________________________________