The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of May 7, 2018

A Sempe cover! And a bonus: a lengthier Cover Story than of late, with several photos (including one of Sempe and Ed Koren astride bicycles in NYC). Nice. Very nice.

On a run through this new issue the number of illustrations and photos seemed even weightier than the past few issues (and that’s really saying something). It’s likely due to Zadie Smith’s profile of photographer, Deana Lawson.  As the profile is of a photographer, using photographs makes sense.  Although, Brendan Gill’s New Yorker profile of the pioneer of celebrity photography, Jerome Zerbe included no photographs. Ah, but that was then (1973), this is forty-five years later.  Three cartoons (from William O’Brian, Stan Hunt and  Dean Vietor) and a hand drawn illustration by Silverman of Mr. Zerbe did appear within the pages of Mr. Gill’s piece. In true New Yorker tradition, the cartoons were unrelated to the content of the Zerbe profile.

A casual run-down of illustrations/photographs in this latest issue:

The usual close to full page photo on the Goings On About Town lead page.

3 full page illustrations

10 illustrations of various sizes.

Nearly 8 pages of photographs within the Lawson Profile 

Looking at that 1973 issue (June 9, 1973 to be exact) I was blown away by the number of cartoons it contained and the space they were allowed on the page. The only illustration was Mr. Silverman’s portrait of Mr. Zerbe (we’re not counting the “spot” drawings which are in a category unto them seIves). In other words: cartoons ruled. 

Below is a screen shot of pages 27-33 from that 1973 issue. Six cartoons in seven pages (cartoons by Warren Miller, Frank Modell, James Stevenson, George Price, William Hamilton, and Mischa Richter).

Two pages following Mr. Richter’s cartoon, this beauty by John Norment:

On the very next page following Mr. Norment’s drawing, this terrific multi-panel drawing by George Booth:

Following Mr. Booth’s piece are nine more cartoons by these cartoonists: Henry Martin, the aforementioned drawings by William O’Brian, Stan Hunt and Dean Vietor; Charles Barsotti, Robert Weber, Ton Smits, James Stevenson’s second in the issue, and Warren Miller’s second in the issue. Each is allowed generous space on the page. Oh, and Charles Saxon did the cover!

For a look at every cartoon in this latest issue I direct your attention to the Cartoon Companion blog. The bloggers “Max” and “Simon” (not their real names) go drawing by drawing, rating each along the way.  Look for the post covering this new issue either late this coming Thursday or Friday. I’m not always in agreement with the CC guys’ ratings, but anytime anyone is talking about New Yorker cartoons, I try my best to pay attention. 

ps: One year later, and Rea Irvin’s classic masthead still is a-missing. 

This is what it looks like:

 

 

 

A Foot of Rejected Cartoons

Rejection is a New Yorker cartoonist’s constant companion. We are rejected every single week we submit work to the magazine (I’ve heard tales of contributors selling up to a half-dozen drawings out of one batch, but I’ve yet to hear of a contributor selling their entire batch.  Please advise if that’s ever happened).  Example: I submit cartoons weekly to the magazine (there is no set number despite the myth you may have heard that we must, or have to send ten a week).  If I’m very very lucky, one of the submitted cartoons will be accepted. The rest, the rejects, are then added to a pile in my work room. In the photo above is the pile that’s accumulated over the past year or so. Eventually I’ll move that pile to storage where it will join its rejected friends from years/decades past. 

Some time ago — fifteen or twenty years? —  I made a stab at organizing my rejects.  I bought plastic bins that held file folders.  I labeled the folders “Dogs” “Cats” “Police” “Food” “Knights” etc., etc.. This organization came in handy when someone would ask for submissions for a collection of drawings about dogs or cats or food or whatever. As the era of themed cartoon collections cooled, I found though that it was wasted time organizing for the possibility of a request for themed cartoons. So that organizing effort ended (although the plastic bins with their folders still exist).

Many cartoonists take their rejected work and try to find a home for it elsewhere. I know of at least one cartoonist who is very successful doing just that. I used to submit rejects to other magazines back when there were a good number of publications using cartoons. Below is a page out of a ledger I briefly kept in 1977.  I quickly realized keeping track of stuff wasn’t my thing.  You see on the page below across the top of the ledger the magazines I was submitting to the summer of that year — the summer when I broke into the New Yorker:  The New Yorker, Esquire,The Saturday Evening Post, Changing Times, Quest, Dawn Dusk, Playboy, Medical Economics, New Woman, and The Ladies Home Journal. Judging my from my entries I wasn’t doing very well until August of 1977, when the New Yorker bought “Nothing will ever happen to you” — after that things started to improve (with the exceptions of The Ladies Home Journal and Medical Economics — nothing of mine ever “clicked” for them).

Over time, the number of publications using cartoons has dwindled.  Most of the action these days is online, where the pay is little-to-none.  “None” is usually disguised as “exposure” as in “we don’t pay, but your work will get plenty of exposure.”

So what to do with these weekly rejected drawings.  Over the years I’d sometimes come across one that seemed it needed a second chance, and so off it went to the New Yorker.  Sometimes a resub (as they are called by cartoonists) is accepted, and published.  I once was even asked to send in resubs. It was around the time my wife and I were expecting our first child. My then editor, Lee Lorenz  sent me a letter saying something to the effect of: “Please send in a bunch of resubs — I know you’re going to be busy for awhile.”  There have even been weeks I resubmitted a drawing that had just been rejected. My personal favorite rejected cartoon is the one below.  I did the unthinkable: convinced of its merit, I stubbornly resubmitted it the very next week after it was rejected. It was accepted (and published December 21, 1998). Hey, you never know.

Mostly though the second chance for a resub (my resubs, not other cartoonists) is its last chance — and that’s okay.  I’ve always felt these rejects were necessary to do to get to the drawing that makes it through to being accepted and published. The rejects are invaluable steps to the printed page.  I’ve realized in the past few years that I rarely, if ever, send in resubs anymore. Emma Allen, the New Yorker‘s current cartoon editor has yet to see one of my drawings submitted twice. There’s no grand plan here — it’s just how it’s working out.

The Tilley Watch Online: The Week of April 23 – 27

This week’s Daily cartoons: Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, TV.  

Brought to you by: David Sipress, whose work book-ended the week, first with a Trumpian cartoon on Monday, and on Friday with a Handmaid’s Tale/Westworld themed cartoon; a very very Trumpian cartoon by Peter Kuper, a Trumpish cartoon by Brendan Loper, and a Lars Kenseth Trump/Macron cartoon.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to the Daily Shouts: Jason Adam Katzenstein (with Phil McAndrew), and Barry Blitt.

All of the above and more can be found here.

The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor on Kanye and the Caption Contest; Commencement Speaker of Interest: Seth; A Favorite Blog; A New Yorker Cover Artist of Interest: Cannaday Chapman

The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor on Kanye and The Caption Contest

Read what Emma Allen, the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor has to say about the Kanye Caption Contest thing going on.

______________________________________________________________________

Commencement Speaker of Interest: Seth

All the info on the poster above and some more here.

__________________________________________________________________________

A Spill Fave Blog: A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker

Time well spent reading this blog.   Above: one of Rose Silver’s seven New Yorker covers.

_______________________________________________________________

Illustrator / New Yorker Cover Artist of Interest: Cannaday Chapman

From Cleveland Magazine, April 25, 2018, “Local Artist Talks About His Work With The New Yorker”