The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of October 15-19, 2018; Cartoon Companion’s Latest Ratings; A Rare New Yorker Cartoon Anthology; More Spills

 It was a less Trumpian than usual  week on the Daily. The contributors: Kim Warp, Jeremy Nguyen, Jason Chatfield (with Scott Dooley) and Lila Ash, with two.  [Note: Ms. Ash’s work has yet to appear in the print magazine].

And over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Edward Steed, Liana Finck, Tim Hamilton, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell.

To see all of the above and more, go here.

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The CC‘s “Max” and “Simon” are back, and they’ve awarded an unusual joint 6 to one of the issue’s cartoons (the boys rate the cartoons from 1 to 6, with 6 the tops). Agree? Disagree? Read here.

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Comics DC‘s editor, Mike Rhode has discovered a hitherto unknown collection — it was unknown to me anyway: Newseum Book of Cartoons.

  See the rest of it here. 

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…”Art As Witness: Political Graphics 2016-2018″ is up and running through November 3 at the School of Visual Arts. Among the contributing New Yorker artists: Andrea Arroyo, R.O. Blechman, Barry Blitt, Edward Sorel, John Cuneo, Felipe Galindo, and Peter Kuper. All the info here.

…On Longreads, “A Woman Becomes A Nightingale” — a timely illustrated piece by Carolita Johnson.

 

 

 

Edward Koren’s New Book!

Yesterday I mentioned Charles Addams as one of a dozen New Yorker cartoonists I’d place in the Cartoon God category.  Today there’s news of a new collection by another of that spectacular dozen, the great Edward Koren.  Mr. Koren’s In the Wild (Button Street Press) will be out in three days.

Here’s the back cover:

Here’s Mr. Koren’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

 

Edward Koren Born, 1935. New Yorker work: May 26, 1962 — . Key collections: Do You Want To Talk About It? ( Pantheon, 1976), Well, There’s Your Problem (Pantheon, 1980), Caution: Small Ensembles (Pantheon, 1983).

Winter, Spring, Summer, Addams

My friend over at Attempted Bloggery recently emailed me: “It’s that time of year.”  I knew exactly what he was talking about before I opened the link he attached. In this New Yorker cartoon-centric world of the Spill, “that time of year,” mid-way through October, could only belong to Charles Addams.

Addams is one of a dozen New Yorker cartoonists I place in the Cartoon God category.  We are so fortunate his work has been well collected — all of his anthologies are easily available (Abebooks is an excellent place to search for them.  Chris Wheeler’s site is a good place to see the covers all at once).

    

We are also fortunate that Linda Davis gave us a biography of Addams: Charles Addams: A Cartoonist’s Life (also easily found online).

When I began contributing to The New Yorker in the late 1970s, Addams was very much a presence in the office. (Ms. Davis’s book includes my account of riding the elevator with him. Comparable, I suppose, to a rookie ballplayer walking into the clubhouse and spotting Mickey Mantle or Willie Mays).  But of course it was Addams’s work that really inspired. It was a gift to open the magazine in those days and turn to a full page Addams drawing.  Not only did it entertain, but it inspired. I learned more than I’ll ever know from examining his drawings — the care put into details; his characters’ perfect expressions; the obvious joy he took drawing whatever he was drawing; the drawing as a whole, caption — if there was one — and art, scoring a near perfect 10 every time. Yes, he had help in the idea department (and here again, I intersected with him, supplying an idea, as did a number of colleagues), but the supplied ideas were elevated through his art.  

As we close in on Halloween there will definitely be an increased Addamsy feel around here; I’ll miss not seeing one of his covers grace the magazine as they often did around now, but the work remains available 24/7. Pounce on it. 

Link here to the official Addams website.   

Here’s Mr. Addams’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection.

 

The Wednesday Watch: Interviews of Interest with Liana Finck and Peter Kuper

Here are three Liana Finck interviews tied into her just released Passing for Human. The first is with fellow New Yorker colleague, Amy Kurzweil: “Two Cartoonists Sit On A Bench And Talk: An Illustrated Interview”

And… from The Herald Scotland,  there’s “Graphic Content: Liana Finck On Awkwardness, anxiety. and being a New Yorker Cartoonist”

Also… from The Beat: “Interview: Liana Finck is surprised she’s relatable, but she’s getting used to the idea”

And here’s a link to “Kafka Bound” Steven Heller’s Print Magazine interview with MAD and New Yorker cartoonist, Peter Kuper, whose Kafkaesque: Fourteen Stories has just been released.

— my thanks to David Pomerantz and Mike Rhode for alerting me to a few of the above pieces.