Talk of Interest: Joe Dator; New Yorker State of Mind Looks at Ralph Barton; An Intersection of Steinberg, Walt Disney and Ungerer?; Stanley Kubrick and Peter Arno; Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

Talk of Interest: Joe Dator

From The Pioneer, April 3, 2018, “New Yorker Cartoonist Shares Insight”—  a piece about a recent talk at Long Island University by one of the New Yorker‘s best contemporary cartoonists (above, right, a segment of his classic piece, How We Do It  from the New Yorker,  September 24 2012

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A New Yorker State of Mind Looks at the Issue of March 16, 1929

This blog is enjoyable as heck. Bonus: lots of Ralph Barton in this particular post . See it here

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Book of Interest: Van Spatz by Anna Haifisch

A book bringing together Walt Disney, Tomi Ungerer, and Steinberg? Read about their fictional intersection here.

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Arno Included in a Stanley Kubrick Photo Exhibit

An exhibit of Stanley Kubrick’s photos for Look magazine will open May 3rd at the Museum of the City of New York.  Peter Arno will be among the subjects on display. Kubrick spent three days photographing Arno in late July 1949. As I wrote in my Arno bio: “The photographs amount to the best visual insight we’ll likely ever have into Arno’s private life…”

I used two photos from the Museum’s Kubrick collection in the Arno bio; one appears on the back cover shown above (that’s the actress Joan Sinclair he’s with at Joan Braun’s Palace Bar).  You can see all the photos — nearly 300 — in the Museum’s collection  here.  

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Cartoon Companion Rates This Week’s New Yorker Cartoons

It wouldn’t be Friday without a brand new Cartoon Companion (well, it would be, but never mind). The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” return with a rated close look at the cartoons appearing in the issue of April 9, 2018 (it’s the one with the Bruce McCall gluten themed cover). It’s always fun to see how much one agrees or disagrees with their ratings.

 

 

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery; Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross

Yesterday Jane Mattimoe gave us an audio snippet of her recent interview with the great Sam Gross.  Today we get the whole print interview right here.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC”s “Max” and “Simon” return with their up-close takes on each and every cartoon in the new issue (y’know, the issue with the brain on the cover).  Read it all here.

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Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Above is just a sample.  To see more, go to Stephen Nadler’s wonderful blog here.

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Finally, it was exactly one year ago today that we lost Jack Ziegler, one of the New Yorker‘s cartoon gods. I’m posting something I wrote, in tribute, shortly after he passed away. It has never been published til now.

Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

The New Yorker hadn’t seen anyone like Jack Ziegler – or more precisely, like Jack Ziegler’s cartoons — when he began submitting his work in the early 1970s. The craziest art the magazine had allowed in was perhaps Edward Koren’s furry, or fuzzy creatures, and of course, Saul Steinberg’s figurative flights of fancy.  Jack brought in a completely different bag of tricks filled with a sensibility borne out of the Mad magazine school of art, but with a firm grasp of New Yorker art history in mind.  He knew what he was doing, and in the great tradition of the magazine’s best artists, he was doing it for himself, to amuse himself. He was not trying to be like a New Yorker cartoonist; he was doing Jack Ziegler cartoons that he wanted to see published in the New Yorker.

His cartoon-like sensibility found hilarity in, most famously, hamburgers and toasters, and, of course, human beings. For Jack, the backyard hibachi was turned into a shrine-like thing of beauty in a Mt. Rushmore like setting complete with Japanese inspired cloud-work.  The regular guy he added to many of his drawings – he called him his “onlooker”  — was always slightly surprised to find himself looking at, say, an enormous hamburger on a beach. I imagine the onlooker was actually Jack, within his own world, not particularly shocked, but accepting of whatever freaky thing he’d come upon in a given cartoon panel.

Jack’s world was a calmly zany world, gleefully shared with all of us.  His work was like the man himself: calmly zany.  He had a wonderful little burst of  laughter when it occurred to him that one of life’s little moments was hysterical. He recognized so many of them in these past forty-three years.  Here’s to sinister Mr. Coffee machines, and giant toasters, and sensitive cowboys, and superheroes losing their shorts, mid-air!

 

 

A Day In the Life of…Liana Finck; The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion; Video: Celebs Captioning Cartoons

A Day In The Life of…Liana Finck

From Medium, March 22, 2018, “The Daily Rituals of a New Yorker Cartoonist (Freelance Edition)” — this piece by Liana Finck.

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The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion

The CC boys, Max and Simon, are back with their rated impressions of the cartoons appearing in the latest issue of The New Yorker. See it here!

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Video: Celebs Captioning Cartoons

newyorker.com has begun a series of short videos showing celebs writing captions for cartoons.  See Bill Hader’s here (the others turn up as well).

What I’d like to see: Video of a bunch of New Yorker cartoonists writing captions for other New Yorker cartoonists’ cartoons.

 

 

 

Blitt’s 15th Trump NYer Cover; Brand New NYer Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion; Library of Congress’s “Drawn To Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists”; More Spills: Cartoonists to Unveil a Mural in Brooklyn, Reginald Marsh Diary Entries, An $800.00 Edition of The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons

Blitt’s 15th Trump New Yorker Cover

The New Yorker sometimes releases its next cover several days early. Today is one of those days. According to the magazine’s covers editor, this is Barry Blitt’s 15th Trump New Yorker cover. For more on Mr. Blitt and his cover, go here.

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Brand New New Yorker Cartoons Rated by Cartoon Companion

If you’re looking for New Yorker cartoon dissection, this is the place for you.  “Max” & “Simon” take you through every cartoon in the latest New Yorker and assign each a rating of 1 – 6 (6 being the top). 

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Library of Congress’s Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists

This title is now available.  Read all about it here!

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There’s a new mural in town: New Yorker cartoonists Corey Pandolph and Drew Dernavich will reveal the piece this Sunday at Crystal Lake Brooklyn at 647 Grand St.. The Unveiling Party, from 6 -9, is open to the public.

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The Diary Review, has a short piece on Reginald Marsh.  Read it here.

Here’s Mr. Marsh’s entry on the A-Z:

 

 

 

Reginald Marsh (above) Born in Paris, March 14, 1898, died in 1954: New Yorker work: 1925 -1944. More information: http://www.dcmooregallery.com/artists/reginald-marsh

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The Spill has been following information being released on the upcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (two volumes totaling 1536 pages). The publisher (previously Blackdog & Leventhal, now Running Press) now lists a deluxe version for $800.00. No info (yet) on what to expect for that much dough.

Here’s a screenshot of the listing — the deluxe version is at the bottom, sans cover image:

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of March 12, 2018

Despite the snow scene outside my window and the forecast for another wallopin’ of snow here in a few days, I know Spring is just around the corner. The latest New Yorker cover — the second by Jenny Kroik — is in the same realm of wishful thinking. Her cover is a welcome respite from politics, which are always just around the corner too. 

Paging through the issue, I noticed a photo under the “Videos” heading at the bottom of the “Contributors” page.  A new online feature: “The New Yorker Interview” — a swell idea.  I’m hoping future interviews will include the magazine’s artists.

Moving quickly now through pet peeves: the use of a near full page photo leading off Goings On About Town; the absence of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk of The Town masthead. 

And now the cartoons: the first of the issue, a Frank Cotham drawing that on my tablet appeared to show a fellow running along a beach (I thought he was running near dune grass).  On the laptop it’s quite clear he’s running in a field.  The runner’s toned legs — a funny touch –are unexpected (in a Cotham drawing) but certainly do indicate this fellow’s been in training. 

Seven pages later, a Carolita Johnson bar drawing. I think this just might be my favorite drawing of hers. The caption is textbook (New Yorker textbook, that is), from the use of the name “Jer” to the mid-caption set-up use of the word “empty” to last word, “peanut.”

Six pages later, another new favorite by a veteran cartoonist.  Drew Dernavich‘s Batman drawing delivers: caption, the drawing itself. Wonderful (I would’ve loved to see the drawing occupy a larger space). Three pages later, Avi Steinberg gives us a turn-about on a favorite pastime for many: people watching. Mr. Steinberg has removed the generally accepted casualness of people-watching and turned it into people-staring.  Awkward.

Three pages later, a moment with an aging couple via Emily Flake. A few pages following Ms. Flake’s drawing, a Roz Chast drawing which made me happily recall cartoonists’ lunches of yore (and even more recently than yore). 

Four pages later, an Olivia de Recat drawing.  As with her two previous drawings, this is text-driven (a Tina Brownism, I think) but not as text-driven as her previous efforts. If Ms. de Recat’s “Big City Sound Machine” was actually being produced I might spring for one if only for the “Dump Truck in Rain” sound — what poetry.

Three pages later a drawing by veteran cartoonist, Mike Twohy.  I associate sack races with town picnics in summertime, but I suppose they’re not exclusive to a season (I played around with a sack race and a seasonal reference many years ago, It appeared in the New Yorker  June 21, 1982, to be exact. See below). I’m also reminded of Robert Day’s 1945 collection, All Out For The Sack Race! I know there’ve been a few other sack race drawings in the magazine but not yet enough to fill up a New Yorker Book of Sack Race Cartoons.

Three pages later a Bob Eckstein game show drawing. Without diving into the piece (that’s what they do over on Cartoon Companion) I really enjoyed the well-situated and funny Tom & Mom contestants.  We used to see game show drawings every so often; it would be great if we got to see more. They are silliness vehicles.

Directly opposite Mr. Eckstein’s drawing (and why it’s directly across is a puzzle — why not in the upper right hand corner?) is a beauty by Edward Koren. A lot to look at in this drawing, as is usually the case with Mr. Koren’s work.

The final drawing in the issue (not counting the Caption Contest drawings) is by Darrin Bell. Criminals on their way to a caper (there’s a word that’s been retired for at least 50 years). Two of the would-be robbers are masked. The driver — who’s quite a large fellow – is unmasked.  This reminded me for some reason of that great scene in The Town, when the guys don rubber nun masks — even the driver. I guess in these situations it’s up to the individual would-be perpetrator to make the masked or unmasked call.