A Rea Irvin Exhibit Recalled; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Ali Fitzgerald Pencilled

What fun: my three favorite New Yorker cartoon-related sites are present and accounted for today.

 

 

More New Yorker art history from Attempted Bloggery, which has unearthed yet another New York Times piece — this time about the spectacular Rea Irvin, who left his fingerprints all over the magazine (and they’re still all over it). I was lucky enough to attend the Irvin exhibit that the Times covered. The Museum of the City of New York did a bang-up job.  I hope they or some other great New York cultural institution has an exhibit in mind for the New Yorker‘s 100th birthday in 2025 (it’s never too early to start planning!).  Here’s the Attempted Bloggery post.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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The online New Yorker cartoon critics, Max and Simon are back with a look at the drawings in the May 1st issue, which includes a rescued kitty, a couple of snakes, and a police lineup. Read it here. Oh, and the CC’s “Mystery Cartoonist” also makes a short but succinct appearance.

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Jane Mattimoe’s  wonderful Case For Pencils blog  is back with the spotlight on Ali Fitzgerald’s tools of the trade.  Ms. Fitzgerald’s work has appeared on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts. See the Pencils post here.

Link here for Ms. Fitzgerald’s website

 

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Where Was This Arno?; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Roz Chast’s Poster; Eckstein’s Upgraded Airline Passenger; Ross Bateup Added to the A-Z

Where did this Peter Arno drawing appear? Attempted Bloggery is looking for the answer. If it was in The New Yorker, it’s somehow eluded  the magazine’s  record-keepers.  Read more here.

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Cartoon Companion is back with a close and entertaining look at the cartoons appearing in the April 17, 2017 New Yorker. This issue contains, among others, two costumed characters, some apartment-hunting ants, a fashion savvy caveman, some duck-hunters, a couple of booze-themed drawings, and a Victorian selfie stick.  Read all about them here.

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Roz Chast is the poster gal for The 2017 National Book Festival. Read about it here. 

(My thanks to Mike Rhode for bringing this to my attention).

 

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From The National Lampoon, here’s a timely cartoon by that funny guy (and Snowman Expert)  Bob Eckstein.

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While idly paging through the August 28th  1971 issue of The New Yorker I came across a cartoonist I somehow missed when compiling the Spill‘s” New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”: Ross Bateup.  Mr. Bateup’s work appeared four times: August 8, 1971; October 16, 1971; November 4, 1972; May 19, 1973. Here’s a link to  his biography.

Here’s his cartoon from the May 19, 1973 issue:

 

 

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; R.C. Harvey’s Lengthy Look at Gluyas Williams

 

 

 

 Click here to see the new Cartoon Companion  where you’ll find a considered (and rated) assessment of all the cartoons in the latest New Yorker.  As usual, a Mystery Cartoonist is along for the fun.  You’ll also run across an un-mysterious me prattling on about my drawing in this issue, which began life, Thurber-ish, with a seal in a living room:

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From The Comics Journal, April 3, 2017, “Gluyas Williams: Master of Line and Shape and Subject” — R. C. Harvey looks at one of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists.  

Left: A 1929 collection of Mr. William’s work

Here’s the Gluyas Williams entry on the Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Gluyas Williams (photo above) Born, San Francisco, 1888. Died, Boston, Mass., 1982. One of the pillars of Harold Ross’s stable of artists, and one of Ross’s favorite cartoonists. His beautiful full page drawings were a regular feature in the magazine. Mr. Williams illustrated a number of Robert Benchley’s collections, providing the cover art as well as illustrations. NYer work: March 13, 1926 – Aug 25, 1951. Key collections: The Gluyas Williams Book ( Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1929), The Gluyas Williams Gallery (Harper, 1956). Website: http://www.gluyaswilliams.com/

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A Note to Ink Spill Visitors:

As Ink Spill  approaches its tenth birthday in August, it’s undergoing its first sprucing up: a new heading here and there (“Sections” & “Posts” for instance), a slightly less cramped look making for an easier read, perhaps some shifting of content. All the major sections (The A-Z, The Library, In the Attic)  will remain, with a few minor ones saying bye-bye.  

 

 

 

 

Fave Photo of the Day: Blitt, Telnaes, Galindo, Taylor and Donnelly; Rating New Yorker Cartoons: Cartoon Companion Looks at a Giant Snowman, Escaping Clowns and More

Here’s a photo from last night’s event “Cartooning the New Reality” at The Museum of The City of New York.  From left to right: Barry Blitt, Ann Telnaes, Felipe Galindo, Whit Taylor, and moderator, Liza Donnelly

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The Cartoon Companion duo hand out some tough and  tender love as they assess the cartoons in this week’s New Yorker.  The issue includes, among others, a pizza dough tossing bat, some hammered soup, and a couple of dead fish. Read it here.

Swann’s Ad with Addams “Z” Subway Car; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Book of Interest: Shannon Wheeler’s “Sh*t My President Says: The Illustrated Tweets of Donald J. Trump”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Was pleased and surprised to come across this full page Swann ad in today’s New York Times (the special “F” section devoted to Museums).  The Addams drawing, included in an upcoming auction, originally appeared in The New Yorker October 1, 1979. That issue, to me, is memorable. For starters the cover, by R.O. Blechman,  is one of my all-time favorite New Yorker covers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The roster of cartoonists in the issue included some heavy hitters from the magazine’s golden age, including George Price (whose drawing in the issue is three-quarters of a page), William Steig, Addams of course, and James Stevenson (represented by a full page drawing).  Also in the issue are some of James Geraghty’s best additions from his later years manning the art editor’s desk: Lee Lorenz, Warren Miller, Edward Koren, Robert Weber, and J.B. Handelsman.  And there are a number of the new kids brought in by Geraghty’s successor, Lee Lorenz: Arnie Levin, Jack Ziegler, Bob Mankoff, Roz Chast and yours truly (another reason the issue was memorable for me: it contained my first sequential drawing).

Looking through the issue at the cartoons one can’t help but notice how the  cartoons sit in a wide variety of space. Price’s three-quarters page, Stevenson’s beautiful full page, my own multi-panel spread bleeding onto a second page, Ziegler’s drawing (the first of two Zieglers in the issue) in an upright rectangle surrounded on three sides by text; Mankoff’s drawing and Arnie Levin’s as well as Addams’s allowed to spread across the width of the page. Weber’s gorgeous drawing run large, and  set so perfectly on the page. What’s even more remarkable about this issue is that it wasn’t unusual — this is what was normal in that time.

 

Here’s what the Addams drawing looked like in that issue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The only blog offering a critical take on each week’s New Yorker cartoons returns with a look at  cavemen pondering their wardrobe, a drafty Hades, a King’s best friend, King Kong’s mom & pop, and 8 more.   Read it here.

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Coming from Top Shelf Productions this summer, Shannon Wheeler’s Sh*t My President Says: The Illustrated Tweets of Donald J. Trump.

From the publisher:

Acclaimed cartoonist Shannon Wheeler (The New Yorker, God Is Disappointed in You, Too Much Coffee Man) transforms Donald Trump’s most revealing tweets into razor-sharp cartoons, offering a subversive and illuminating insight into the mind of the most divisive political figure of our time. Whether you love him or hate him, this take on Trump will help you come to grips with the man and his ideas thanks to Wheeler’s signature mix of slapstick and sophistication.

Details here.

An Edward Koren Exhibit & Talk; New Yorker’s Latest Cartoons, Rated On A Scale of 1 to 6; The Tilley Watch: Fact-Checking At The New Yorker

An exhibit of original art by one of The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Gods, Edward Koren, will open Saturday March 18 at Vermont’s  Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. BMAC’S Website here.

From the press release:

Quirky creatures will…inhabit the exhibit SERIOUSLY FUNNY in the museum’s East Gallery. The exhibit consists of 16 original drawings and prints by longtime New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren, best known for his iconic, fuzzy-haired, long-nosed denizens of New York’s Upper West Side. Koren and curator Jeff Danziger will give a talk at BMAC on Thursday, April 20 at 7 p.m.

 

Here’s Mr. Koren’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Edward Koren (photo above,Fall 2016,courtesy of Gil Roth)  Born, 1935. New Yorker work: May 26, 1962 — . Key collections: Do You Want To Talk About It? (Pantheon,1976), Well, There’s Your Problem (Pantheon, 1980), Caution: Small Ensembles (Pantheon,1983).

Link here to Edward Koren’s website

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The mysterious “Max” and “Simon” have returned (along with the equally mysterious Mystery Guest New Yorker Cartoonist) to assess the latest New Yorker cartoons. This week: Krimstein’s coffee, Bliss’s spooky campfire story,  Borchart’s bees, and more.

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The Gray Lady sends off Bob Mankoff with a piece on his own cartoons (Emma Allen replaces Mr. Mankoff as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor this Spring).

Mr. Mankoff tells Ink Spill that one of his post-editorship projects,  The Encyclopedia Of New Yorker Cartoons, will contain, in his words, “a massive 4,000 cartoons” —  look for it in 2018.

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From The Columbia Journalism Review, March 8, 2017, “The New Yorker’s chief fact-checker on how to get things right in the era of ‘post-truth'” —  Peter Canby (shown below), who has been  at The New Yorker since 1978, talks fact-checking. 

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Tom Toro Talks Trump; Messing Around With The New Yorker’s Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the latest installment of The Cartoon Companion:  Ed Steed’s fowl: chickens or ducks?…plus Dernavich’s refrigerator, Cotham’s stairway to heaven, and more.

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Tom Toro has been drawing a lot of Trumps lately.  He talks about the experience on the Huffington Post: “New Yorker Cartoonist Explains Why Humor is the Heartbeat of Democracy”

Link here to Mr. Toro’s website

 

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The latest New Yorker features a Russian-inspired Eustace Tilley and Rea Irvin typeface.

You might wonder when the magazine has played with its look before.  Here are just a few examples:

 

Rea Irvin (of course!) broke  the mold first. Jan 2, 1932

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S. Liam Dunne in 1934

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rea Irvin (again) in 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The one-and-only Helen Hokinson in 1948

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Stevenson in 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Stevenson again in 1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Lorenz On James Stevenson; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“Postscript: James Stevenson”

James Stevenson is remembered by the great cartoonist  Lee Lorenz  who, as The New Yorker‘s  Art Editor guided the magazine’s Art Department (that included the cartoons and the covers) from 1973 through 1993, and then served as Cartoon Editor from 1993 through 1997.  Mr. Lorenz was Mr. Stevenson’s editor from 1973 through 1993.

 

More Stevenson:

…from the Greenwich Times, February 21, 2017,  “James Stevenson, New Yorker Cartoonist, Cos Cob Resident, Dies”

…from The New York Times, February 24, 2017, “James Stevenson, Ex-New Yorker illustrator, Dies at 87” *

*If only someone at The New York Times could change “Ex-New Yorker Illustrator” to “New Yorker Cartoonist” — Mr. Stevenson was first and foremost a New Yorker cartoonist.

UPDATE: The online headline for Mr. Stevenson’s New York Times obit has just been changed to read “New Yorker Cartoonist” …thank you, NYTs!

…Special Note: Attempted Bloggery has been featuring art by Mr. Stevenson all week.  Check it out!

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The latest Cartoon Companion is posted. The two anonymous critics take a close look at the cartoons appearing in the issue of February 27th.  A new rating system is in effect.

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