From Ink Spill’s Archives: An Early Cartoon Bank Brochure

As we rapidly approach the end of Bob Mankoff’s tenure as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Ink Spill takes a quick look back to the mid 1990s (before Mr. Mankoff was appointed by Tina Brown to that position) when he founded something called the Cartoon Bank. The CB (as it came to be called in the cartoon community) was eventually sold to Conde Nast.

Mr. Mankoff wrote in his memoir, How About Never — Is Never Good For You: “I agreed to sell the Cartoon Bank [to Conde Nast] as long as two conditions were met: (1) I would continue to be its president and (2) I would also become cartoon editor.”

  Here’s a brochure cover from those pre-Conde Nast Cartoon Bank days and a page out of the brochure describing the “birth of the Cartoon Bank”:

 

An Edward Koren Exhibit & Talk; New Yorker’s Latest Cartoons, Rated On A Scale of 1 to 6; The Tilley Watch: Fact-Checking At The New Yorker

An exhibit of original art by one of The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Gods, Edward Koren, will open Saturday March 18 at Vermont’s  Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. BMAC’S Website here.

From the press release:

Quirky creatures will…inhabit the exhibit SERIOUSLY FUNNY in the museum’s East Gallery. The exhibit consists of 16 original drawings and prints by longtime New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren, best known for his iconic, fuzzy-haired, long-nosed denizens of New York’s Upper West Side. Koren and curator Jeff Danziger will give a talk at BMAC on Thursday, April 20 at 7 p.m.

 

Here’s Mr. Koren’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Edward Koren (photo above,Fall 2016,courtesy of Gil Roth)  Born, 1935. New Yorker work: May 26, 1962 — . Key collections: Do You Want To Talk About It? (Pantheon,1976), Well, There’s Your Problem (Pantheon, 1980), Caution: Small Ensembles (Pantheon,1983).

Link here to Edward Koren’s website

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The mysterious “Max” and “Simon” have returned (along with the equally mysterious Mystery Guest New Yorker Cartoonist) to assess the latest New Yorker cartoons. This week: Krimstein’s coffee, Bliss’s spooky campfire story,  Borchart’s bees, and more.

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The Gray Lady sends off Bob Mankoff with a piece on his own cartoons (Emma Allen replaces Mr. Mankoff as the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor this Spring).

Mr. Mankoff tells Ink Spill that one of his post-editorship projects,  The Encyclopedia Of New Yorker Cartoons, will contain, in his words, “a massive 4,000 cartoons” —  look for it in 2018.

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From The Columbia Journalism Review, March 8, 2017, “The New Yorker’s chief fact-checker on how to get things right in the era of ‘post-truth'” —  Peter Canby (shown below), who has been  at The New Yorker since 1978, talks fact-checking. 

 

Emma Allen To Succeed New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a memo to all New Yorker Cartoonists this afternoon, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick announced that  Emma Allen, a New Yorker editor will succeed Bob Mankoff as cartoon editor in two months time.

In part, the memo reads:

The person I’ve chosen to be the next cartoon editor is Emma Allen, who has worked in recent years an editor of The Talk of the Town, a writer, and the driving force behind Daily Shouts, which is one of the best features of newyorker.com. Unlike Bob and Lee, she is not a cartoonist, but then neither was James Geraghty, who did the job before Lee. (Hell, William Shawn was not a writer, either, and he wasn’t too bad in the editing department.) Emma has a terrific eye for talent, knows the history of cartooning deeply, and is an immensely energetic and intelligent and sympathetic editor. She will work with Colin Stokes on selecting cartoons, running the caption contest, and creating a bigger digital footprint for cartoons. I am quite sure that we have only just begun to figure out new ways to explore and exploit digital technologies as a way to distribute your work to more and new readers. All of this is intended to stake out a healthy future for cartoons at The New Yorker.

Ms. Allen will be the third person in the magazine’s history in charge of editing its cartoons (Rea Irvin, who helped the magazine’s founder develop the New Yorker’s cartoon culture, was considered the art supervisor).  James Geraghty,  hired in 1939, was the first official cartoon editor (his title was Art Editor).  Lee Lorenz succeeded Mr. Geraghty in 1973 and held that position (as Art Editor from 1973 -1993 and then as cartoon editor from 1993-1997) until Mr. Mankoff was appointed in ’97.

Update: In a statement released to the press, Mr. Mankoff had this to say:

“My greatest gratitude goes to the cartoonists. I know how much easier it is to pick a good cartoon than do one, much less the many thousands they have done and will continue to do,” Mankoff said. “And, continue they will, with Emma Allen who now takes over this most iconic of all New Yorker features. I wish her and them the best of luck. And me, too—I’ve got to find that old cartoon pen of mine.” 

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The filmmaker Sally Williams has been hard at work on her documentary about James Stevenson. Here’s a brief clip from the film.

Link here for even more on Sally Williams

Link here to see some of Mr. Stevenson’s New Yorker work

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Gerberg at The New School Tonight; Another New Cartoonist at The New Yorker; An Early Sidney Harris Collection

A reminder that long-time New Yorker cartoonist, Mort Gerberg will be speaking at The New School this evening. All the details here.

Mr. Gerberg’s entry on Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Mort Gerberg Born, March 11, 1931, New York, NY.  NYer work: April 10, 1965 – .  Co-edited, with Ron Wolin & Ed Fisher,  The Art in Cartooning: Seventy-five Years of American Magazine Cartoons (Charles Scribner & Son, 1975).

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Earlier this month it was noted here that the work of two new cartoonists had been added to the magazine’s stable of cartoonists (Jeremy Nguyen and Alice Cheng). The number of new cartoonists added to The New Yorker’s stable of cartoonists  in 2017 is now  three.   The latest issue of the magazine, March 6, 2017 contains yet another new addition, Jim Benton.

Last year 16 new cartoonists were added (a record high). According to Ink Spill’s fairly reliable tally  of new cartoonists added since Bob Mankoff became cartoon editor in 1997 the total is now 128.  That number counts teams of cartoonists as one (sorry team members!).

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Following a discussion with a fellow cartoonist the other day about Sidney Harris’s cartoon collections, I went online to see if I could find a non-themed collection of his.  Mr. Harris has published a lot of  themed collections (his latest, 101 Funny Things About Global Warming is an anthology featuring his own work and the work of a number of his colleagues), but I could not recall what I think of as a standard collection, such as say Charles Addams’s Favorite Haunts.   In less than a few seconds the title shown here popped up. Pardon Me, Miss! was published by Dell in 1973 (his first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of July 9, 1973).  The title will be added to Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists Library.

 

Signed & Drawn

From the always interesting Attempted Bloggery, this fun piece, with scans, about a signed copy of Lee Lorenz’s The Art of The New Yorker. (Mr. Lorenz was the Art Editor of The New Yorker from 1973 — 1993, then Cartoon Editor from 1993 — 1997).

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