The Tilley Watch Online; Photos from the Kovarsky Opening; “Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

Among the magazine’s Daily cartoons this week:  Kim Warp’s weary winter weather drawing; Brendan Loper’s tweeter-in-chief cartoon;  Lars Kenseth’s  take on this week’s  unusual White House media moment, and Peter Kuper’s Trumpian map of the world.   

Over on Daily Shouts, these were the contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen and Liana Finck

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Photos From the Kovarsky Opening at The Society of Illustrators

A packed house last night at the Society of Illustrators Opening Reception for Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker. Here’s an array of photos (all by Liza Donnelly, with one exception: the photo of Liza Donnelly and her husband– that’s courtesy of Gina Kovarsky)

Above: a wall of Kovarskys.

Below: Anatol Kovarsky’s daughter, Gina, and Mr. Kovarsky’s wife, Lucille Patton; Ellen Lind and John Lind.  Gina Kovarsky and John Lind co-curated the exhibit.

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Sam Gross and Felipe Galindo

Below: New Yorker cartoonists Liza Donnelly and Michael Maslin

Below: Sam Gross and New Yorker cartoonist Bob Eckstein

Below: Writer/illustrator Mo Willems, Columbia University’s Curator for Comics and Cartoons, Karen Green, and John Lind

 

A closing thought on the exhibit, which runs til March 3 of this year:

This is a terrific show.  The energy bouncing off Mr. Kovarsky’s work on the walls is inspiring.   After looking at all of the covers and drawings I went back and spent more time looking at Mr. Kovarsky’s very first cartoon for the New Yorker.  It was published in the issue of March 1, 1947; here’s how it appeared:

I’ve always had a special affection for first New Yorker drawings.  It is, as they say, a moment.  Every cartoonist remembers the details surrounding their first published drawing. The unspoken mini-drama surrounding the first is that no one knows, of course, whether there’ll be a second (see the Spill‘s One Clubbers on the A-Z).  In Mr. Kovarsky’s case there was a second, and then there were hundreds more — close to 300 in fact. If that wasn’t something impressive in itself, he also contributed 40 covers.  And all this work was done in the relatively short time span of twenty-two years (according to Gina Kovarsky: “In the 1970s, Kovarsky shifted his main focus from cartooning to fine art…”).  It will not come as a surprise to anyone seeing this exhibit how Kovarsky accomplished so much in a mere two decades. It is as if he never set his pen or his brush down for a moment. Kovarsky’s world seemed to be abuzz 24/7. How lucky for us all.   

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“Not OK” Cartoonists in Westchester

From Westchester Magazine, January 12, 2018, “You Can Meet New Yorker Cartoonists…”

 Here’s a capsule description from the article:

“Not OK” — Great Cartoons That Weren’t Good Enough is a collection of works by previous New Yorker-published cartoonists that fit exactly that bill. Curated by artist and Brooklynite David Ostow, this series has come to Westchester for a month-long showing following the completion of its original gallery run in Bushwick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addams Drawing Sells for $31,000; Leighton’s Puzzle Pieces; An Interview with Snowman Expert, and “World’s Greatest Bookstores” Author, Bob Eckstein; An Interview with Jeremy Nguyen

Charles Addams Drawing Sells For $31,000.

The wonderful Charles Addams drawing shown above sold for $31, 200.00 at last week’s Swann Galleries auction.  Wowzers.  Oddly, as befits anything having to do with Mr. Addams, the Swann catalog incorrectly stated the date of publication (Swann says it was published in the January 18, 1947 New Yorker).  It was actually published in the February 8, 1947 New Yorker.  Here’s a screen grab of the issue from the New Yorker‘s online digital database, showing the drawing set within a John Cheever short story:

And here’s the post-auction listing from Swann:

 — A look at the hammer prices for the rest of the New Yorker art auctioned indicated most selling just above the high end of the estimated range; a few that didn’t sell, and a small number that sold below the estimate.

The world record for an Addams original was set in 2012: $42,625.00

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Leighton’s Puzzle Pieces 

A special Puzzles section in this past Sunday’s New York Times  features three of Robert Leighton’s drawings on a huge puzzle covering two pages (I’m showing one of the three above). Mr. Leighton was the subject of a Spill piece back in 2013.

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An Interview with Snowman Expert and “World’s Greatest Bookstores” Author, Bob Eckstein

From the Times-Herald, December 16, 2017, “Prolific cartoonist pays visit to Warwick”

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An Interview with Jeremy Nguyen

From The Vector, Fall 2017, “Jeremy Nguyen ’07: A Cartoonist For The New Yorker” — an interview with the cartoonist whose work first appeared in the New Yorker this past February. 

 

Liniers, the Musician; PR: More Nancy, More Blitt; Bob Eckstein’s Daily News Op-Ed

Liniers, the  Musician

“The Argentine Cartoonist Who Moonlights As A Rock Nerd” — a piece about Liniers, the fellow responsible for the above 2016 anniversary cover. Read it here

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More Nancy, More Blitt

From the Vineyard Gazette, “When Brevity  Underscores Genius, A Good Laugh Is Around the Corner”  — a piece on Karasik & Newgarden’s How To Read NancyRead it here.

…And here’s an interview with  Barry Blitt on The Roundtable on WAMC in Albany.  Mr. Blitt is on tour promoting his anthology, Blitt. Listen here.

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Bob Eckstein’s New York Daily News Op-Ed

Mr. Eckstein‘s latest Op-ed piece in the Daily News. Read it here.

A Rafter of Kovarsky Turkeys; A Favorite Thanksgiving Cartoon Revisited

A Rafter of Kovarsky Turkeys

Thanks to the generosity of Anatol Kovarsky’s family, here are a number of the artist’s unpublished sketches (mostly turkeys, plus a few chickens) as well as an unpublished sketch of his Thanksgiving New Yorker cover of November 24, 1962 ( the finished cover art appears as well). Mr. Kovarsky’s work will be celebrated this coming January in an exhibition at the Society of Illustrators.

 

For more on Mr. Kovarsky, who passed away in 2016, here’s a Spill piece from 2013, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”  (this piece also appeared on the New Yorker‘s website in a slightly edited form).

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A Favorite Thanksgiving Cartoon Revisited

The above drawing by Bob Eckstein appeared in The New Yorker, November 26, 2012. It remains one of my all-time favorite Thanksgiving cartoons.  When it appeared I asked Mr. Eckstein a few questions about it:

Michael Maslin: Bob, your drawing, The First 3-D Thanksgiving, is, I believe, the first 3-D cartoon in the magazine’s history (if anyone out there finds another, please bring it to my attention).  Is it actually 3-D?  If I was wearing 3-D glasses right now, and looking at your drawing, would it be appear three-dimensional?

Bob Eckstein: It works, but not as well as it could, but that is by design.  It is 3-D but we reeled it back.  Knowing the reader wouldn’t have glasses, I went for the most readable degree of 3-Ding the cartoon so it still looked like a cartoon and not this heavy ominous image on the page which would have distracted from the joke.

MM: We should probably give a shout-out to Norman Rockwell, whose famous 1942 Saturday Evening Post “Freedom From Want”  piece is obviously referenced in your drawing.  Did you have Rockwell’s work in front of you when you were working on your finished piece?

BE: I had it in front of me, and underneath me, as I did trace most of the guy in the back and then glanced over to draw the rest of the set-up.  My initial sketch had the whole family shocked at the dancing turkey but it looked too forced and too different from the Rockwell iconic piece.  I realized Rockwell had it right the first time except he forgot the glasses.

 

 

 

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at the Society of Illustrators; Interview of Interest: Tom Toro; Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden; Brendan Loper’s Town Square; Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Photos of Interest: George Booth Event at The Society of Illustrators

As visitors to this site know, there’s an exhibit of work by George Booth at The Society of Illustrators. The show is a real treat.  Last night Mr. Booth was on stage in front of a packed house, telling stories and answering questions. Here are some photos, courtesy of Liza Donnelly.

Above, left – right: George Booth; Jeremy Nguyen (hat, green glasses), David Borchart (green sweater); Bob Eckstein (with pen & paper).

Below,  left – right: Seth Fleishman (back to camera), Drew Dernavich, Corey Pandolph; Sam Gross, Maria Scrivan.

Below: the scene at The Society.  On stage: Sarah Booth, George Booth, and J.J. Sedelmaier, who curated the exhibit.

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Interview of Interest: Tom Toro

From Fiction Writers Review, November 7, 2017, “Setting the Tone: An Interview with Tom Toro”

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Lecture of Interest: Karasik & Newgarden

___________________________________________________________________________________  Brendan Loper’s Town Square

From the Lititiz Record Express,  November 8, 2017,  “Drawing attention to Lititiz: New Yorker cartoon causes mixed reactions”— this piece on a recent New Yorker “Daily” cartoon by Brendan Loper

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Book of Interest: Peter Kuper

Coming in June, 2018 from University Press of Mississippi, Conversations: Peter Kuper (Conversations With Comic Artists Series).

From the publisher:

Along with two dozen images, this volume features ten lively, informative interviews with Kuper. The book also includes a quartet of revealing interviews with underground comix legends R. Crumb and Vaughn Bodé, Mad magazine publisher William Gaines, and Jack Kirby, co-creator of mainstream superheroes from the Avengers to the Fantastic Four. These were conducted by Kuper and fellow artist Seth Tobocman in the early 1970s, when they were teenagers. 

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Interview of Interest: Barry Blitt; Fave Photos of the Day: Gross, Eckstein, Booth, Byrnes, Nguyen, Cotham, and Le Lievre

From Politico, “‘Wry Titters’ in the Age of Trump” — an interview with Barry Blitt, who has an anthology of his work coming out next week.

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Fave Photos of the Day

New Yorker cartoonist, Julia Suits took these fine photos at 1 World Trade Center (home of the New Yorker) this past September. My thanks to Ms. Suits for allowing them to be posted here.

Above: standing left-right: Bob Eckstein, Sam Gross, Pat Byrnes, George Booth.  Seated: Frank Cotham.

Below: Sam Gross and George Booth 

Glen Le Lievre in silhouette

Sam Gross, Jeremy Nguyen, and Frank Cotham