The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of July 30, 2018

The early release Barry Blitt Trump flat-on-his-face cover (above, right) was mentioned here last week, so onward we go to the brand new issue.  Fifteen cartoons in the issue, eighteen illustrations.  With five of those illustrations full page, I’d say the magazine is most definitely in a new age of illustration (the old age was during Tina Brown’s reign as editor. She brought illustration, including photographs, big-time into the magazine). The magazine had a golden age of cartoons that began in the late 1930s and roughly extended into the early 1950s. A new age of sorts (golden, platinum, silver — does it really matter?) began in the late 1960s, early 1970s and lasted several decades. I wouldn’t put a label on the age we’re in now because we’re in it (kind’ve a can’t see the forest for the trees thing).  

Three cartoons really stand out for me in this issue:

Kim Warp’s Dog Watching A Guy Grill Burgers Cartoon

I immediately saw a good bit of Jack Ziegler’s work in Ms. Warp’s wonderful cartoon.  The burgers, of course (see Mr. Ziegler’s classic collection: Hamburger Madness) as well as the situation of the guy grilling on the deck.  And then there’s the deck itself, with the deck boards so well delineated. Mr. Ziegler loved that kind of detail. The dog’s thought balloon also recalls Ziegler’s work as does the wording.  What’s so great is that while the drawing has its Ziegleresque elements and a Ziegleresque feel to it, it’s 1000% Warp. I asked Ms. Warp if her drawing was in any way Ziegler inspired and she replied in an email:

In some way it was inspired by Jack Ziegler’s food/BBQ cartoons as I loved his work and they are in my brain forever. I was thinking of our dog, Maggie, who always has an eye out for spills, and somehow the Ziegler vibe came through. I think it sold partly because of the word ‘bungle’ which they said they hadn’t seen in a while. It comes up in my life all the time.

Joe Dator’s “…rock-based content” Cartoon

Mr. Dator’s work continues to fascinate. You can just see how much he enjoys drawing his world. I especially like his attention to detail in this drawing: the lighting, the instruments…geez, it’s all clicking.

 Danny Shanahan’s Excellent Jack-and-the-Beanstalk Cartoon

Mr. Shanahan’s giants drawing is solid work, an evergreen. Seeing a drawing that works as well as this reminds me of what someone said about the difference between Fred Astaire’s and Gene Kelly’s dancing: with Kelly, you see the sweat.  In cartoonville, I’d rather not be distracted by seeing the sweat. With Shanahan, you don’t see the sweat. I asked Mr. Shanahan if there’s anything we should know about this drawing, and he replied via email:

No real interesting back story, other than that I was a bit disappointed when it wasn’t run fairly quickly after being purchased (the week of 6/28/2016!), because I thought that it might lose its topicality. No such luck- some gifts just keep on giving.
 

Of Further Interest

In this issue is a Talk piece by the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, who went to a cartoonists lunch and spoke with the lunching cartoonists as well as “crasher” Gus Van Sant (his new movie is based on a memoir by the cartoonist, John Callahan). I’m searching my memory bank now to recall the last time a New Yorker cartoon editor showed up at a cartoonists lunch. It was a very very long time ago, perhaps as long ago as the James Geraghty years (he was the art editor from 1939- 1973).

Some paperwork: Elisabeth McNair‘s work debuts in this week’s New Yorker.  Ms. McNair is the 14th cartoonist to be brought in by Emma Allen since she took up the position of cartoon editor in May of 2017.

For the record, the 14 are (with their debut issue alongside their name):

1. Sharon Levy (July 10, 2017)

2. Joseph Dottini (October 16, 2017)

3. Jon Adams (October 16, 2017)

4. Sophia Wiedeman (October 16, 2017)

5. Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (November 20, 2017)

6. Emma Hunsinger (November 27, 2017)

7. Sophia Warren (November 27, 2017)

8. Maggie Mull  (December 11, 2017)

9. Mary Lawton (December 11, 2017)

10. Pia Guerra (December 18, 2017)

11. Julia Bernhard  (January 1, 2018)

12. Navied Mahdavian (February 26, 2018)

13. Bishakh Som (March 19, 2018)

14. Elisabeth McNair (July 30, 2018)

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead

Before this post wraps up, I’d like to bring in a guest, David Ochsner. Mr. Ochsner, the fellow behind A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine, has graciously allowed the Spill to run his findings about the changes to Rea Irvin’s Talk Of The Town masthead over the years. As regular visitors to the Monday Tilley Watch know, there’s a weekly nod to Mr. Irvin’s Talk masthead due to its having been dismayingly eighty-sixed in May of 2017 for a redrawn version by Christoph Niemann (his redraw appears all the way at the bottom right below — you can read about it here).

Here’s Mr. Ochsner:

The first change I noticed was six months after the magazine launched (Aug. 22, 1925), when the masthead lost some of its shading and some shadow structures were introduced in the foreground. A week later Woollcott was dropped from the masthead and replaced by Hugh Wiley. The following January the editors’ names were dropped altogether. On Jan. 30, 1926, the letters were enlarged and superimposed over the buildings, which rose up on the notched, curving line that Irvin introduced. Then 54+ years later, in 1980, the letters shifted to the right, the “K” rather than the “E” now superimposed over the tower (to accommodate the re-drawing or standardization of the Irvin font–most noticeable is the serif clipped from the “N”). 

— Til next week

 

Chatfield Pencilled; From Dick Buchanan’s Files: Work by Gardner Rea; Splat! New Yorker Reveals Its Next Cover; Even More Cartoons; New Yorker Union Certified

Chatfield Pencilled

Jason Chatfield is up next on A Case For Pencils, Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog wherein New Yorker cartoonists show us their tools of the trade.  Read it here!

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 From Dick Buchanan’s files via Mike Lynch: Gardner Rea

Mike Lynch has posted another bevy of cartoons from Dick Buchanan’s Files.  This time it’s work from the underappreciated Gardner Rea.  See it all here

Here’s Mr. Rea’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Gardner Rea (self portrait above from Collier’s Collects Its Wits. Photo from Rea’s NYTs obit, 1966.) Born, Ironton, Ohio 1892. Died, 1966. Collections: The Gentleman Says It’s Pixies / Collier’s Cartoons by Gardner Rea (Robert McBride & Co. 1944), Gardner Rea’s Sideshow (Robert McBride & Co, 1945). New Yorker work: 1st issue (February 21, 1925) – 1965.

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Splat! New Yorker Reveals Its Next Cover

Barry Blitt talks to Francoise Mouly about his cover (above) for next week’s issue. And here’s a Washington Post piece about it.

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Even More Cartoons

 12 more pages, showing 18 more cartoons have been released by the publisher of the upcoming (October) New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons. See them here on the book’s Amazon listing.

With 3000 images promised, we’ve been shown a total of 25.  Only 2975 to go!

Note to tote bag afficionadoes: If you preorder either the $800.00 deluxe edition or the not-deluxe $100.00 edition, you’ll receive a tote bag.

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New Yorker Union Certified

The News Guild of New York posted this photo on Twitter congratulating the New Yorker Union’s certification. Keen-eyed observers will note a portion of James Thurber’s wall drawings on the extreme right. The drawings have moved with the magazine since it left its second home at 25 West 43rd Street in 1991.

This is what the drawings look like without company :

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of July 2, 2018

  Link here to read what Barry Blitt had to say about his tied-in to the headlines cover (shown above).

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One of these days I’m going to gather all the New Yorker covers that’ve incorporated the Statue of Liberty. For now, I took a look back to see when Lady Liberty first appeared on a New Yorker cover. Surprisingly, it took awhile to show up what with the the magazine being, in those earliest of issues, so New York City-centric. Its debut was on the Sue Williams cover of September 7, 1929:

 The Statue’s next appearance was on the cover of June 24, 1939, when artist Leonard Dove incorporated it humorously:

It wasn’t until the end of WW2 that the statue appeared again — in the issue dated the week the war ended with Japan’s surrender. Alan Dunn shows us a troop ship arriving home in New York Harbor; soldiers are sticking their heads out of portholes, looking to see Lady Liberty way off in the distance, her silhouette just barely decipherable. Graphically speaking, in this instance less is powerfully more.

And now on to the current issue, close to seventy-three years later.  From the Dept. of Just Sayin’:  21 illustrations this week, 3 of them full pages. Just 10 cartoons (plus one full page by Ed Steed).

Noting two of the ten this week: Roz Chast makes excellent use of one of the cartoonist’s handiest tools: the hot dog cart. In this case it’s floss being sold not franks. What I really like about Ms. Chast’s cartoon is that it falls into the wonderful New Yorker cartoon vein of being both surprising and highly relatable. It delivers on Peter Arno’s definition of a good cartoon: a drawing that deals a one-two punch.  If the Spill handed out ribbons like they do over on the Cartoon Companion site, this cartoon would be awarded one. The Spill does, however, applaud.

The other cartoon noted is by Seth Fleishman.  Bulls driving racing cars at Pamplona, with the lead car driven by a person.  A lovely drawing. I believe there are at least two Charles Addams cartoons with a moose driving a car, but bulls driving cars is a rarity. One somewhat closer to Mr. Fleishman’s that comes readily to mind (forgive me) is a drawing of mine from the ancient times. It appeared in The New Yorker, March 7, 1989 — technically, those are steer.

 

For the record, your honor, here’s the list of cartoonists in the issue (the aforementioned Mr. Steed’s page is listed higher up on the Table of Contents):

Lastly, here’s Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead from The New Yorker.  It disappeared in May of 2017, bafflingly replaced by a redrawn version. For more on this, go here.

— See you next week

  

 

  

 

 

 

Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Cover Exhibit Of Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics; Addams Hometown Throws Addams Fest in October

 Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Upcoming New Yorker covers are usually posted early Monday morning, but occasionally we get an advance look.  Barry Blitt is the cover artist for next week’s issue. 

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Exhibit Of  Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics

Opening today at the New York Transit Museum in downtown Brooklyn, this fabulous exhibit  comprised of “satirical cartoons, comic strips and comic books from the 19th to 21st centuries.” Works by over 120 artists are represented including the following New Yorker contributors: Roz Chast, Peter Kuper, Eric Drooker, Ben Katchor, Julia Wertz, and Art Young.  Along with the art, there will be panel discussions, gallery talks and sketch nights.

For all the info go here.

(cartoon courtesy of Peter Kuper)

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Addams Hometown Throws  Addams Fest in October

Mark your calendar: Charles Addams’ hometown will hold its first Addams Fest over three days in October (26, 27, and 28). Lectures, exhibits and screenings are planned.  Read about it here.

Above: a screen shot of a very short teaser video for the fest.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

The Tilley Watch Online: May 21- 25, 2018; Edward Sorel’s Rise and Fall of Truman Capote

Mostly Trumpian Daily cartoons this week (as they’ve been for quite some time), with a bonus Daily courtesy of Barry Blitt on Friday. Others contributing through the week: Peter Kuper (twice), Lars Kenseth, David Sipress and Brendan Loper.  

Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists were:  Sophia Warren & Jeremy Nguyen (a team effort, Liana Finck, Jason Adam Katzenstein (with Karen Chee), and Maggie Larson.

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Edward Sorel in The New York Times Book Review

I should’ve mentioned this a while back, but better late than…well you know. Our grand master of caricature, Edward Sorel has been working on a series of back pages for The New York Times Book Review. His latest: “The Rise and Fall of Truman Capote” appears this week.

Mr. Sorel has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1990.

Link to his website here.

 

The Tilley Watch Online: The Week of April 23 – 27

This week’s Daily cartoons: Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, TV.  

Brought to you by: David Sipress, whose work book-ended the week, first with a Trumpian cartoon on Monday, and on Friday with a Handmaid’s Tale/Westworld themed cartoon; a very very Trumpian cartoon by Peter Kuper, a Trumpish cartoon by Brendan Loper, and a Lars Kenseth Trump/Macron cartoon.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to the Daily Shouts: Jason Adam Katzenstein (with Phil McAndrew), and Barry Blitt.

All of the above and more can be found here.