Cartoons Holding “A Mirror Up to the War Effort”: The New Yorker War Album… & More

The New Yorker War Album, published in 1942, was the very first themed Album of the magazine’s cartoons. Peter Arno’s cover from the issue of February 28, 1942 was selected as the cover.  As so often the case for the Album series an Arno drawing led off the collection (“Of course if they don’t bomb Sutton Place, I’m going to look like a damn fool.”)

There is no introduction to the work — only the flap copy shown below. “Spot” artists (Susanne Suba being an example) are credited along with the cartoonists.

The back cover, mostly a green field, has a small Alan Dunn caption-less drawing floating in the center:

The War Album follows in line with all the previous Albums in size, quality of layout, and of course, quality of drawings.  The bottom line with these Albums: if you see one, buy it.

Below, a spread with a Roberta MacDonald multi-panel across the top, a Barbara Shermund drawing lower left and a Perry Barlow lower right.

Along with the War Album the New Yorker produced a number of special publications during the war:

The Pony Editions.

These were smaller versions of the magazine, 6″ x 9″, given free to servicemen and servicewomen. These were not exact duplicates of the regular editions of the magazine — they carried no advertising and editorial content was juggled. One striking difference: the back cover was a full page cartoon (as shown above). According to Thomas Kunkel in his Ross biography Genius In Disguise, these editions began appearing in September of 1943 and were discontinued shortly after the end of the war.

The New Yorker War Cartoons.

Paperback, and, like the Pony Editions, 6″ x 9″.  Published in 1945, with an introduction by E.J. Kahn, Jr.. Cartoons with Talk pieces throughout.

The New Yorker Cartoons with The Talk of the Town

Also published in 1945 (and also 6″ x 9″)  Hardcover and softcover editions. An introduction by Russell Maloney.

I like Mr. Maloney’s introduction so much I’m showing a portion below (the whole piece can be found here):

Armed Services Editions.

Judging by the list of available titles provided at the end of each edition there were close to a thousand titles issued during the war (a wide variety, from Mark Twain to Thackeray).  I don’t have a complete list so I’m in the dark about which New Yorker-related  titles were issued other the one shown here, The Thurber Carnival, The New Yorker’s Baedeker, The New Yorker Profiles, and Thurber’s Let Your Mind Alone. (If anyone knows of more please let me know).  These special publications were very small: 3 3/4″ x 5 1/2″ — small enough to fit in a soldier’s pocket.  There was a Bill Maudlin Armed Services title published (it’s #822, Up Front). Technically, he was a New Yorker cartoonist with one drawing published,  April 1, 1950.  But that appeared five years after Up Front was published in 1945.  Splitting hairs, I know.  

 

 

 

Walking Tour of Interest: Library of Congress’s “Drawn To Purpose”; Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler; Kovarsky Opening Reception at the Society of Illustrators, Friday, Jan. 12!

From Comics DC, January 9, 2018, “Touring the LoC’s Drawn  to Purpose exhibit with curator Martha Kennedy” — an interesting walk through with Mike Rhode. Among the New Yorker contributors mentioned: Barbara Shermund, Roberta MacDonald, Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Helen Hokinson, and Alice Harvey. Read it here.

Link to the Library of Congress’s page here.

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Exhibit of Interest: Shannon Wheeler

From Bleeding Cool. January 9, 2018, “Shannon Wheeler’s Exhibition of Trump Cartoons, Across From Mar-A-Lago

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A Reminder: The Opening Reception for the Society of Illustrator’s exhibit “Kovarsky’s World: Covers and Cartoons From the New Yorker” is this Friday, January 12thDetails here.  

More Unseen Kovarsky: Mike Lynch has posted a number of previously unpublished work by Mr. Kovarsky.  See it here!

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; Attempted Bloggery Uncovers Sizzling Platters

This week’s Daily cartoons (these are cartoons that appear only online and are not in the print version of the magazine) include appearances by David Sipress (businessmen in D.C.), Chris Weyant (a fortune teller sees law & order ahead), Zach Kanin (a pantsless sovereign), and Ellis Rosen (two drawings: Santa watching the results of the recent Alabama senate race, and an animated comment on net neutrality).

Over on Daily Shouts, contributing  New Yorker cartoonists include a duo effort by Jason Adam Katzenstein & Farley Katz, “Some Health Insurance Plans That Would Actually Work For Me” and the third of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper” advice pieces.

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Attempted Bloggery Uncovers Sizzling Platters

Attempted Bloggery, one of the Spill’s favorite blogs, unearths three New Yorker drawings centered on sizzling platters (one of them, by Barbara Shermund, is shown above).

While you’re on the AB site, scroll down to see a Dorothy McKay cover for the (old old) Life magazine. 

Here’s Ms. McKay’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:


Dorothy McKay ( Self portrait above from Meet the Artist, 1943; Photo from Cartoon Humor, 1938) Born c.1904, died June, 1974 New York City. New Yorker work: 1934 -1936.

 

 

Unseen Shermund

Courtesy of the ever-watchful eye of Stephen Nadler over at Attempted Bloggery we  are treated to this beautiful ( and beautifully timed — it being the first day of Fall) Barbara Shermund cover submission that didn’t make the cut. To read more about it, go here.

Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later. post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

 

 

Barbara Shermund on the Cover of…Esquire

When Warren Bernard (of SPX) offered his scanned collection of advertising work by New Yorker cartoonists for use on this site, he included some bonus scans.  Among them were non-advertising work by New Yorker contributors that appeared in Esquire.  Looking through them the other day, Barnbara Shermund’s covers for Esquire popped out on the screen. Here are the four covers Mr. Bernard sent along.  There are a number of Shermund Esquire cartoons in his collection as well — I’ll show those at a later time.  If you want to read a quick capsule history of Ms. Shermund’s career, go here. Of note: Ms. Shermund had eight covers for The New Yorker. Her first was the 17th cover in the magazine’s history. I’ll show it here to give you an idea how her work changed from 1925 to the 1940s.

If you enlarge the covers, you’ll see that cartoonists appearing in each issue are named.  You’ll also notice how many of them are New Yorker contributors (such as Garrett Price, Michael Berry, Frank Beaven, Howard Baer, E. Simms Campbell, Eldon Dedini, and Sam Cobean).  A source (okay, it’s Bob Mankoff, Esquire’s cartoon editor) informed me that Esquire has a complete digital archive of all its cartoons — I’m hoping to get my hands on it one of these days in order to share even more cross-over information. Speaking of Sam Cobean, there was one Cobean Esquire cover included in Mr. Bernard’s collection:

Here’s Barbara Shermund’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z (and Mr. Cobean’s as well):

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

Sam Cobean (pictured above. Source: Sam Cobean’s World. See link to site below) Born, December 28, 1913, Gettysburgh, Penn. Died, July 2, 1951, Watkins Glen, New York. NYer work: 1944 -1951. Collections: Cobean’s Naked Eye (Harper Bros.,1950), the Cartoons of Cobean (Harper & Bros.,1952). Cobean’s Estate set up a terrific website in his honor. It includes a lengthy biography, with photographs, as well as a detailed listing of all Cobean’s published work. Website: Sam Cobean’s World http://www.samcobean.com/

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 3: Barbara Shermund

We continue with the Spill’s special presentation of Warren Bernard’s collection of ads by New Yorker cartoonists. My thanks to Mr. Bernard for all the elbow work collecting these.

Today we see four Barbara Shermund ads.  Ms. Shermund is surely one of the most important (and sadly, overlooked) early contributors to the magazine.  To read a whole lot more about her consult Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons.

Here are the dates for the ads: Pepsi Cola: 1945; Ry Krisp: 1938; Phillips: 1966; Wings Sportswear: 1944

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later. post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)