Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss; Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Appearance of Interest: Harry Bliss

Harry Bliss, a New Yorker contributor since 1998,  will speak at the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History on September 18th.  All the details here.

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Attempted Bloggery Begins a Gregory d’Alessio Appreciation

Gregory d’Alessio, a New Yorker contributor  — he contributed from 1934 – 1940 — who doesn’t get much attention is finally getting some over on Stephen Nadler’s Attempted BloggerySee it here.

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 15: Abner Dean

Speaking of an artist who doesn’t get much attention, next up is Abner Dean (the entire series, with the exception of the Absolut ads, courtesy of SPX’s Warren Bernard). All of Mr. Dean’s ads are for the Aetna Insurance Group, and are presented chronologically, clockwise beginning from the upper left, from 1945 -1951.

Mr. Dean’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC. According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.” He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chast at the National Book Festival; Attempted Bloggery on an “Arno” at Auction

Chast at the National Book Festival

From Politics & Prose, “A National Book Festival for All Ages” — this piece on the upcoming D.C. event (Roz Chast mentioned).

Link here to Ms. Chast’s website.

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Attempted Bloggery on an “Arno” at Auction

An interesting piece over on Attempted Bloggery about a purported original Peter Arno drawing at auction.  Read about it here.

 

 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 4: Steinberg; Liza Donnelly Live-Draws The Late Show with Stephen Colbert; Rejected New Yorker Covers by Whittington, Higgins; Video: New York City in the 1920s

Steinberg did ad work?  You bet.  As with William Steig, a Steinberg Part 2 will be posted at some later time. 

Warren Bernard,  Executive Director of SPX, is the one responsible for researching & gathering all these images. My thanks to Warren for allowing them to appear here.

Here are the dates for these ads:  Emerson, 1948; House & Garden, 1955; Morton International, 1966; Jones & Lamson, 1946

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Steinberg’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

 

Saul Steinberg  (above) Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Liza Donnelly Live Draws The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

CBS News Resident Cartoonist, Liza Donnelly, visited the Ed Sullivan Theater  (yeah yeah yeah!) the other day to draw The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Here’s an article on The Huffington Post about her visit.  And go here to see more of her Late Show drawings and read what she had to say about the experience.

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Rejected New Yorker Covers by Whittington, Higgins

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery continues its look at proposed (and ultimately rejected) New Yorker covers. 

In the past few days we’ve seen this one by Donald Higgins, and in AB’s latest post, one by Larry Whittington. See and read all about them here.

 

 

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Video: New York City in the 1920s

If you have twelve minutes to spare, here’s a fun video of  New York City in the 1920s from Hey New York State. The screen grab shows Peter Arno tussling Alexander Woollcott’s hair (you can see that that happens at the 11:34 mark — it’s very brief). Other highlights: George Gershwin rehearsing, Chaplin playing piano, Fanny Brice singing (the video is mostly silent, but Ms. Brice is heard), some waterfront footage and Manhattan street scenes galore…check it out here. 

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1: Peter Arno; Shanahan’s Sharks

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1

Warren Bernard, author of the wonderful book, Cartoons For Victory, as well as Executive Director of The Small Press Expo, has generously allowed the Spill access to hundreds of images he has collected that depict advertising work executed by New Yorker cartoonists. The Spill will post these from time-to-time. This is not an all-inclusive survey, but a look back at some interesting work mostly lost to time (many of these ads were unknown to me until recently).

We’ll start with a handful of ads featuring the unmistakable drawings of Peter Arno. Arno’s drawings were in high demand by Madison Avenue during the four decades he contributed to The New Yorker. They were the lucrative sideline that went a long way to helping him live the Park Avenue penthouse life he at times lived.

I’m only showing a few of his ads here, and not including the entire run of Pepsi-Cola ads that so riled Harold Ross (the New Yorker’s founder and first editor) — those will be for another time.  Also for another time: the Gem Razor ad campaign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Bernard has helpfully identified the date of each ad:  Alemite (1949); Kindness (1968); Calvert Reserve (1944); Jockey (1939); Ry-Krisp (1941)

Here’s Mr. Arno’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

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Shanahan’s Sharks

Attempted Bloggery has found a Danny Shanahan New Yorker cover that’s been enhanced by the artist himself.

Mr. Nadler, who runs the AB, notes it’s a fine way to kick off the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week.

Link here to see Danny Shanahan’s New Yorker work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

 

 

 

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; A Barbara Shermund Rejected Cover; A Courthouse Opening

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

The CC boys are back with their thoughts and idiosyncratic ratings for the cartoons appearing in the latest issue of The New Yorker. In this issue are, among others, cartoons featuring dogs, doctors, tombstones, and fish.  Read all about everything here.

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A Barbara Shermund Rejected Cover

Attempted Bloggery continues its week-long look at proposed, but rejected, New Yorker covers.  Today’s is by the great Barbara Shermund. Check it out here. 

Here Ms. Shermund’s entry on the A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later. post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

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Cartoon Opening in a Courthouse

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There’ve been a whole lot of cartoons set in courtrooms, but I wonder how many cartoons have been in a courthouse. Bob Mankoff, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1977 (and is now cartoon editor of Esquire), had an opening in the Federal Building Eastern District Courthouse yesterday (it’s in Brooklyn). Courtesy of cartoonist and author,  Bob Eckstein, we have a couple of photographs from the event:

 

Fave Photos of the Day: Liana Finck’s Opening; Attempted Bloggery Looks at Proposed New Yorker Cover Art

Fave Photos of the Day: Liana Finck’s Opening

Liza Donnelly put on her Ink Spill photographer’s hat last night while attending Liana Fincks opening at the Equity Gallery in lower Manhattan (that’s Ms. Finck holding the flowers).  My thanks to Ms. Donnelly for providing the photos below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Attempted Bloggery Looks at Proposed New Yorker Cover Art

All this week, Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery is looking at cover art proposed, but rejected by The New Yorker.  Here’s a portion of a piece submitted by Julian de Miskey.  For the whole piece, and a lot more info, go here.