The Tilley Watch Online: June 18-22, 2018; Attempted Bloggery’s 7th Index

This week’s Daily Cartoons were as Trumpian as previous weeks.  The contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ellis Rosen (twice, both Trumpish), Brendan Loper (twice, both Trump flavored), and Danny Shanahan (who blended the World Cup with an iconic Andrew Wyeth painting).

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to this week’s Daily Shouts: Amy Kurzweil, Sara Lautman (with Rebecca Caplan), Jeremy Nguyen (with Daniel Kibblesmith), and Drew Dernavich.

____________________________________________________________

Attempted Bloggery’s 7th Anniversary Index

One of the Spill‘s go-to sites, Attempted Bloggery, celebrates its 7th Anniversary with this posting of the blogs 5th Index by Stephen Nadler (the fellow behind the AB‘s curtain).  A lot of fun awaits visitors.  The Index can be found here!

 

 

 

Podcast of Interest with Illustrations by Hilary Campbell, Sophia Warren, Amy Kurzweil; A New Yorker State of Mind Goes Deep Into the Issue of May 25, 1929; A lot of Hokinson on Attempted Bloggery

From Broadway World, June 14, 2018, “New Scripted Soap Opera Podcast GOSSIP is out today from Stitcher/Midroll”

— with Hilary Campbell, Sophia Warren and Amy Kurzweil content

Ms. Campbell’s website.

Ms. Warren’s website.

Ms. Kurzweil’s website.

___________________________________________________________

A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of the New Yorker: the issue of May 25, 1929

One of the Spill‘s fave blogs is up to the midway point of the last year of the 1920s.  Fun reading here.

__________________________________________________________

A lot of Hokinson on Attempted Bloggery

And on another favorite Spill blog, Attempted Bloggery, there’s been a lot of Helen Hokinson lately.  Check it out here.

___________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion Rates the Father’s Day Issue Cartoons

The CC boys have returned with their rated takes on each and every cartoon in the New Yorker’s latest issue (June 18, 2018).  Read it here.

 

The Deluxe New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons: A Few Details

A photo (above) and a few details (below) have been posted about the $800.00 deluxe edition of the upcoming The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (Blackdog & Leventhal):

“With a limited printing of 1,000 copies, this Deluxe edition of THE NEW YORKER ENCYCLOPEDIA OF CARTOONS features 3 signed, numbered limited edition prints in individual portfolios, one each by famed artists Robert Mankoff, Bruce Eric Kaplan, and Roz Chast.”

(my thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for bringing this to my attention).

A Lot of Searle on Attempted Bloggery; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks at the New Yorker of May 11, 1929; Cartoon Companion Rates the Very Latest New Yorker Cartoons

A Lot of Searle on Attempted Bloggery

Attempted Bloggery has turned its attention to various Ronald Searle materials (books, auction items, etc.). See it all here.

Mr. Searle’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Ronald Searle (pictured above) Born, Cambridge, England March 3, 1920. Died, December 30, 2011, Draguignan, France. Steven Heller, who wrote Searle’s obit for The New York Times (Jan 4, 2012) said Searle’s “outlandishly witty illustrations for books, magazine covers, newspaper editorial pages and advertisements helped define postwar graphic humor…”

New Yorker work (including covers and cartoons): November 12, 1966 – August 19, 2002. An interesting tribute site: ronaldsearle.blogspot.com/ Searle’s wiki entry: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Searle

_________________________________________________

A New Yorker State of Mind Looks at the Issue of May 11, 1929

Wow — look at that cover by the great Rea Irvin.  As always with every issue, A New Yorker State of Mind digs deep.   Go see/read!   

________________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The Cartoon Companion boys, “Max” & “Simon” take a look at the cartoons in the latest New Yorker.  It’s a double issue;  the cover (above) is by Loveis Wise (read her comments on the cover here).

See the CC’s takes and ratings here.

 

Victoria Roberts Pencilled; Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art; Seth’s Commencement Address; Philip Roth Jaywalking on West 79th St.

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils returns with a look at Victoria Roberts’ tools of the trade. See it here!

Ms. Roberts began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

_____________________________________________________________________

Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art

This week Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery looks at items acquired at the MoCCA Fest.  Today it’s John Cuneo‘s Not Waving But Drawing. Read it here. Above right: Mr. Cuneo’s most recent New Yorker cover.

Photo above: Mr. Cuneo in the foreground seated next to Anelle Miller, the Director of The Society of Illustrators.  In the back, from left to right: Cartoonist Felipe Galindo, Stephen Nadler, and cartoonist Marc Bilgrey  (photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly).

________________________________________________________________

Seth’s Commencement Address

From The Comics Journal, May 22, 2018, “Seth’s 2018 Center For Cartoon Studies Commencement Speech” — read the entire address here.

Seth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

________________________________________________________

A Split-Second Encounter With Philip Roth

Back in the Fall of 2014, driving on Columbus Avenue, I made a right turn onto West 79th Street. As my wife and I once had an apartment on 79th I often made a point of driving past the address on the way back upstate. For some reason on this particular day, after rounding the corner, and well short of our old apartment building, I immediately pulled over on the north side of the street and illegally parked for a moment. Just then a taxi pulled right in front of me, and parked. The right side back door of the taxi opened and a fellow holding a cane gingerly got out. He started to make his way to the rear of the cab and then began to negotiate between the cab’s rear bumper and my front bumper. I wanted the guy to know I wasn’t going to move my car while he was there — a simple courtesy — so I looked right at him, and he looked right at me (I suppose to make sure I wasn’t going to move my car): it was Philip Roth. I waited til he’d crossed diagonally southwest on 79th before taking the picture you see above.  A nice split-second encounter with a favorite writer.