Victoria Roberts Pencilled; Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art; Seth’s Commencement Address; Philip Roth Jaywalking on West 79th St.

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils returns with a look at Victoria Roberts’ tools of the trade. See it here!

Ms. Roberts began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

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Attempted Bloggery on Cuneo’s Art

This week Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery looks at items acquired at the MoCCA Fest.  Today it’s John Cuneo‘s Not Waving But Drawing. Read it here. Above right: Mr. Cuneo’s most recent New Yorker cover.

Photo above: Mr. Cuneo in the foreground seated next to Anelle Miller, the Director of The Society of Illustrators.  In the back, from left to right: Cartoonist Felipe Galindo, Stephen Nadler, and cartoonist Marc Bilgrey  (photo courtesy of Liza Donnelly).

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Seth’s Commencement Address

From The Comics Journal, May 22, 2018, “Seth’s 2018 Center For Cartoon Studies Commencement Speech” — read the entire address here.

Seth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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A Split-Second Encounter With Philip Roth

Back in the Fall of 2014, driving on Columbus Avenue, I made a right turn onto West 79th Street. As my wife and I once had an apartment on 79th I often made a point of driving past the address on the way back upstate. For some reason on this particular day, after rounding the corner, and well short of our old apartment building, I immediately pulled over on the north side of the street and illegally parked for a moment. Just then a taxi pulled right in front of me, and parked. The right side back door of the taxi opened and a fellow holding a cane gingerly got out. He started to make his way to the rear of the cab and then began to negotiate between the cab’s rear bumper and my front bumper. I wanted the guy to know I wasn’t going to move my car while he was there — a simple courtesy — so I looked right at him, and he looked right at me (I suppose to make sure I wasn’t going to move my car): it was Philip Roth. I waited til he’d crossed diagonally southwest on 79th before taking the picture you see above.  A nice split-second encounter with a favorite writer. 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; More Mischa on Attempted Bloggery

The Daily Cartoons (not 100% Trumpian, but close!) were handled this past week by the following cartoonists: Darrin Bell, Ellis Rosen, Emily Flake, Drew Panckeri, and Brendan Loper. 

And over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Liana Finck, and a team effort by Jason Adam Katzenstein and Sophia Warren.

All of the above work and more can be found here.

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More Mischa on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler continues his Mischa Richter fest on Attempted Bloggery.  Mr. Richter is a member the Spill’s K Club  (the club’s 23 member have sold a thousand or more cartoons to The New Yorker). Mr. Richter’s New Yorker career spanned sixty-one years (I believe the cartoonist record-holder is William Steig at seventy-three years).

Cartoonist Mike Lynch on Dwindling Cartoon Markets; Mischa Richter on Attempted Bloggery; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

From Mike Lynch, May 2, 2018, “Another Market For Gag Cartoons is Going Going Gone”

Reader’s Digest is in the headlights here.

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 Attempted Bloggery on Mischa Richter

Following up his E. Simms Campbell fest, Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery moves on to Mischa Richter. Looking forward to what he has come up with. See today’s Richter post here.

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A New Yorker State of Mind Looks At The April 20, 1929 New Yorker

A New Yorker State of Mind forges ahead with another in-depth look at an issue from ages ago.  Above: The issue, with an Arthur Kronengold cover — one of 22 of his published by the magazine. Here’s the post! 

 

 

Exhibit of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Arthur Getz; Review of Interest: Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s New Book; Follow-Up: John Cuneo’s Spring Cover

From The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon, “The Art of Arthur Getz: City and Country” an exhibit of work by the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists.  Opens May 5th.  

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for bringing this exhibit to my attention. Be sure to check out his site today for an interesting piece on Mischa Richter.

Mr. Getz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z: 

Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913; died, 1996. New Yorker work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published, and one cover). According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

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Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s New Book

From Publishers Weekly, April 30, 2018,  “The Wild Woman of Comix” — Leela Corman’s review of Ms. Kominsky-Crumb’s latest book, out today. 

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Follow-Up: John Cuneo’s Spring Cover

Visitors to this site may remember a recent piece, “Favorite Cover Submission of the Week” — featuring the work of New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo.  Happy & pleased to say the cover (slightly revised) has found a home, shown below right, on Chronogram, a splendid Hudson Valley (NY) publication.

 

Exhibit of Interest: Mary Petty; Article of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist John Cuneo; The Tilley Watch Online; And Even More E. Simms Campbell

Exhibit of Interest: Mary Petty

 What fun! 30 Mary Petty watercolors on exhibit at the Huntsville (Alabama) Museum of Art:  The Life and Art of Mary Petty.

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Article of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist John Cuneo

From HV1, April 11, 2018, “Dancing Bears and John Cuneo’s Portable Therapy” — this good read about the fascinating Mr. Cuneo.

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The Tilley Watch Online: April 9-13

The week’s Daily Cartoons were courtesy of: Peter Kuper (Trump’s cabinet), Ellis Rosen (politics: Michael Cohen), Kim Warp ( Facebook), Brendan Loper (politics: Trump-related), and Paul Noth (taxes)

On Daily Shouts, contributing the New Yorker cartoonists were Maddie Dai, Kim Warp, and Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell

All of the above, and more, can be seen here.

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And Even More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

As the world turns, let’s not forget that Stephen Nadler continues his E. Simms Campbell fest on his wonderful blog.  So much to see there (here).

Here’s Mr. Campbell’s entry on the A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell (photo above) Born, 1906. Died, 1971. NYer work: 1932 -1942. Key collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist); More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

 

 

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery; Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross

Yesterday Jane Mattimoe gave us an audio snippet of her recent interview with the great Sam Gross.  Today we get the whole print interview right here.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC”s “Max” and “Simon” return with their up-close takes on each and every cartoon in the new issue (y’know, the issue with the brain on the cover).  Read it all here.

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Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Above is just a sample.  To see more, go to Stephen Nadler’s wonderful blog here.

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Finally, it was exactly one year ago today that we lost Jack Ziegler, one of the New Yorker‘s cartoon gods. I’m posting something I wrote, in tribute, shortly after he passed away. It has never been published til now.

Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

The New Yorker hadn’t seen anyone like Jack Ziegler – or more precisely, like Jack Ziegler’s cartoons — when he began submitting his work in the early 1970s. The craziest art the magazine had allowed in was perhaps Edward Koren’s furry, or fuzzy creatures, and of course, Saul Steinberg’s figurative flights of fancy.  Jack brought in a completely different bag of tricks filled with a sensibility borne out of the Mad magazine school of art, but with a firm grasp of New Yorker art history in mind.  He knew what he was doing, and in the great tradition of the magazine’s best artists, he was doing it for himself, to amuse himself. He was not trying to be like a New Yorker cartoonist; he was doing Jack Ziegler cartoons that he wanted to see published in the New Yorker.

His cartoon-like sensibility found hilarity in, most famously, hamburgers and toasters, and, of course, human beings. For Jack, the backyard hibachi was turned into a shrine-like thing of beauty in a Mt. Rushmore like setting complete with Japanese inspired cloud-work.  The regular guy he added to many of his drawings – he called him his “onlooker”  — was always slightly surprised to find himself looking at, say, an enormous hamburger on a beach. I imagine the onlooker was actually Jack, within his own world, not particularly shocked, but accepting of whatever freaky thing he’d come upon in a given cartoon panel.

Jack’s world was a calmly zany world, gleefully shared with all of us.  His work was like the man himself: calmly zany.  He had a wonderful little burst of  laughter when it occurred to him that one of life’s little moments was hysterical. He recognized so many of them in these past forty-three years.  Here’s to sinister Mr. Coffee machines, and giant toasters, and sensitive cowboys, and superheroes losing their shorts, mid-air!