Cartoonist David Sipress on Staying Sane in Trumpland; Attempted Bloggery Looks at Tomato Juice Ads by Thurber, Arno, Steig, Hoff, and Soglow; Cartoon Companion Rates the New Yorker’s Latest Cartoons; Preview: New Yorker’s 92nd Anniversary Issue Cover


Post of Interest:  David Sipress’s  Cultural Comment on, February 3, 2017 “How To Stay Sane As A Cartoonist in Trumpland”

See Mr. Sipress’s New Yorker work here on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.



Attempted Bloggery updates a post looking into Libby Tomato Juice ads featuring some of the all-time great New Yorker cartoonists. See it all here!


Cartoon Companion has returned with a look at the latest New Yorker cartoons (the February 6 2017 issue).  Read it here.



The New Yorker has posted a preview of its upcoming anniversary issue.  Eustace Tilley fans, who look forward to seeing the magazine’s mascot every mid-February on the cover will have to wait another year (if not longer, judging by the last six years). The post also includes a slide show of the non-classic Eustace covers.

For those keeping track, Rea Irvin‘s  cover has not been on an anniversary issue since 2011.


Need more Tilley?  Here’s  “Tilley Over Time”  — a piece of mine that ran on the New Yorker‘s website in 2008.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on Ink Spill‘s   “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z “:

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.




Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind– Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker; Appearance of Interest: Bob Eckstein in Massachusetts; An Otto Soglow Treasure Trove




























How lucky we are that someone has been reading every issue of The New Yorker since its inaugural issue, highlighting and exploring certain aspects of each issue along the way.* I may have mentioned A New Yorker State of Mind some time ago, but it’s time to mention it again. It’s a delight.  See it here.

*Attempted Bloggery was on a similar track awhile back. Fun and fascinating reading.

(Above: A cover by Ilonka Karasz. More here on Ms. Karasz)



From  The Berkshire Eagle, December 9, 2016, “A Conversation with Matt Tannenbaum” — this piece includes references to Bob Eckstein who will speak about his new book, Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores at Mr. Tannenbaum’s bookstore this coming Thursday.

Eckstein's books

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.










From the bookseller, Between The Covers, this offering of 66 Otto Soglow New Yorker spot drawings.  Price: $25,000. That’s only about $380.00 per drawing.  A steal!  See the listing here.

(A bonus: Tom Bloom’s illustrations appear throughout the bookseller’s site).

Mr. Soglow’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. NYer work: 1925 -1974.Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.


Signed & Drawn

From the always interesting Attempted Bloggery, this fun piece, with scans, about a signed copy of Lee Lorenz’s The Art of The New Yorker. (Mr. Lorenz was the Art Editor of The New Yorker from 1973 — 1993, then Cartoon Editor from 1993 — 1997).


Attempted Bloggery: The New Yorker & the New President; A new Hopeless But Not Serious Post from Peter Steiner

cover-story-staake-the-wall-875x1200-1478824922Attempted Bloggery, a favorite Ink Spill blog, ruminates on the upcoming administration and New Yorker cartoons. Read it here.  (left: Bob Staake’s latest cover for the New Yorker).



Hopeless but not...




Peter Steiner’s Hopeless But Not Serious, another favorite, is back… with Chris Christie .  See it here.

Link to Peter Steiner’s website here.

Event of Note: Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer in Conversation, Oct. 20th; More Spills: Al Frueh’s Studio and Paul Noth’s Book News

sorel_feifferCartoon gods Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer will be in conversation on October 20th at the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia.  Mark your calendar!  Details here.

Mr. Sorel’s latest book, Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 is due this October while Mr. Feiffer’s latest, Cousin Joseph, is just out. Both are published by Liveright. 9781631490231_300













More Spills Icon EditedPaul Noth has signed up for three books with Bloomsbury.  Writing on Facebook about the news, Mr. Noth said: “They’re my favorite thing I’ve ever done.”

And here’s what Publisher’s Weekly had to say:


 The illustrated adventure series features Happy Junior, a bearded 10-year-old who wants to be normal but can’t, thanks to his family, including his father, a brilliant inventor whose screwball products are trumpeted in TV infomercials, his five unusual sisters, and his despotic grandmother who has relegated the whole family to a basement corner of her grand estate. The first book in the series, How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens, will be published in winter 2018…


And from out of left field, this real estate listing for a Greenwich Village townhouse (34 Perry Street) that includes a mention of Al Frueh, who had the first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker.

*New Yorker Minutiae Recollection Award of the year goes to Stephen Nadler, who runs the wonderfully entertaining and informative Attempted Bloggery.  Stephen wrote to me after reading this post and pointed out that this very same studio  was mentioned in that very same inaugural issue under the heading In Our Midst. And here it is:

NYer Frueh




From the realtor’s listing:”The fourth floor is exceptional. In 1924, it was transformed into a loft and artist studio by renowned New Yorker cartoonist Mr. Al Frueh with a raised roof and extraordinary large windows and north facing skylight across the entire frontage.”

Al Frueh's studio