New Yorker Cartoons Golden Age Editor; Roz Chast in San Francisco; More Spills with Nguyen, Rosen, Eckstein, Flake, Finck, Donnelly and Arno

 

 

 

 

Rounding out this historic week for New Yorker cartoons and cartoonists as we say “Goodbye” to Bob Mankoff and “Hello” to Emma Allen is an article from the early 1970s as another transition was about to take place: long-time New Yorker Art Editor, James Geraghty  was beginning to think retirement, but his successor was not yet in place (the successor would be Lee Lorenz). See the Geraghty article here at Attempted Bloggery

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Roz Chast was recently out west for the opening of the traveling exhibit “Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs”– here’s a brief interview with her from The Jewish News of California, posted April 26th, 2017: “Life’s Funny Like That: New Yorker Cartoonist’s Memoir on Exhibit at CJM”

 

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Jeremy Nguyen and Ellis Rosen will be unveiling their rejected cartoons at the Downtown Variety Hour on May 1st. Details here. ________________________________________________________________________________

My favorite snowman expert, Bob Eckstein, has been out in the Windy City on a Spring tour promoting his lovely new book, Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores Here’s a short interview with him from The Chicago Tribune.

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…A reminder  that the upcoming Pen World Voices Festival of International Literature will present  Women In Ink, with a boffo panel featuring Emily Flake, Roz Chast, Liana Finck, and Rayma Suprani. Liza Donnelly will moderate. Details here.

 

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Finally, for those who enjoy the obscure: the Swann Galleries has a 1932 Peter Arno poster up for auction on May 25th.  A beauty! Details here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Rea Irvin Exhibit Recalled; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Ali Fitzgerald Pencilled

What fun: my three favorite New Yorker cartoon-related sites are present and accounted for today.

 

 

More New Yorker art history from Attempted Bloggery, which has unearthed yet another New York Times piece — this time about the spectacular Rea Irvin, who left his fingerprints all over the magazine (and they’re still all over it). I was lucky enough to attend the Irvin exhibit that the Times covered. The Museum of the City of New York did a bang-up job.  I hope they or some other great New York cultural institution has an exhibit in mind for the New Yorker‘s 100th birthday in 2025 (it’s never too early to start planning!).  Here’s the Attempted Bloggery post.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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The online New Yorker cartoon critics, Max and Simon are back with a look at the drawings in the May 1st issue, which includes a rescued kitty, a couple of snakes, and a police lineup. Read it here. Oh, and the CC’s “Mystery Cartoonist” also makes a short but succinct appearance.

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Jane Mattimoe’s  wonderful Case For Pencils blog  is back with the spotlight on Ali Fitzgerald’s tools of the trade.  Ms. Fitzgerald’s work has appeared on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts. See the Pencils post here.

Link here for Ms. Fitzgerald’s website

 

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Attempted Bloggery Recalls A 20 Year Old New York Times Piece on The State of New Yorker Cartoons

As The New Yorker Cartoon Department shifts this week from one era to another (Mankoff to Allen), here’s a blast from the past: Attempted Bloggery reminds us of a long-ago New York Times piece (published June 9, 1997).

I’ve always had a fondness for this piece as it includes an amusing attack on my pie crust drawing published in the New Yorker, June 9, 1997 (you can see the cartoon in the Attempted Bloggery post).

Personal Archive: A Rejected Easter Cover; John Drummond, Cartoonist & Member of Ink Spill’s One Club Has Died; An Arno Mystery Solved

I’ve submitted a lot of cover ideas to The New Yorker over the years. Two were bought, but never ran, and two others were bought as cartoons (one ran, the other is still in the magazine’s archives). This Easter-themed submission, obviously done when I was in a Charles Addams mood,  never got a nibble from the editors.  But I’ve always liked it enough to drag it out this time of year.  It dates from the late 1980s — either the Robert Gottlieb era, or possibly the very end of the William Shawn era.  

 

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D.D. Degg has informed Ink Spill that  John Drummond, passed away on April 11 at age 90.  Mr. Drummond, whose one appearance in The New Yorker qualified him as a One Club* member worked for a number of national magazines.  His one New Yorker drawing, shown here, appeared October 2, 1965.

Read his obit here.

A short profile here.

 

*Ink Spill‘s One Club is limited to cartoonists who were published just once in The New Yorker.  Their One Club status is noted on the members “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entry by the red top-hatted fellow   Members qualify only after thirty years have passed since their one and only appearance.

(My thanks to Mr. Degg for the links to Mr. Drummond’s obit and profile. More links courtesy of Mr. Degg here. )

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Just a few days ago, we wondered where this Peter Arno drawing appeared. Attempted Bloggery now has the answer. Find it here.

 

 

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Where Was This Arno?; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Roz Chast’s Poster; Eckstein’s Upgraded Airline Passenger; Ross Bateup Added to the A-Z

Where did this Peter Arno drawing appear? Attempted Bloggery is looking for the answer. If it was in The New Yorker, it’s somehow eluded  the magazine’s  record-keepers.  Read more here.

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Cartoon Companion is back with a close and entertaining look at the cartoons appearing in the April 17, 2017 New Yorker. This issue contains, among others, two costumed characters, some apartment-hunting ants, a fashion savvy caveman, some duck-hunters, a couple of booze-themed drawings, and a Victorian selfie stick.  Read all about them here.

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Roz Chast is the poster gal for The 2017 National Book Festival. Read about it here. 

(My thanks to Mike Rhode for bringing this to my attention).

 

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From The National Lampoon, here’s a timely cartoon by that funny guy (and Snowman Expert)  Bob Eckstein.

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While idly paging through the August 28th  1971 issue of The New Yorker I came across a cartoonist I somehow missed when compiling the Spill‘s” New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”: Ross Bateup.  Mr. Bateup’s work appeared four times: August 8, 1971; October 16, 1971; November 4, 1972; May 19, 1973. Here’s a link to  his biography.

Here’s his cartoon from the May 19, 1973 issue:

 

 

 

Attempted Bloggery Looks at an Addams Cover; Kim Warp on Meeting Jack Ziegler

One of my go-to New Yorker-related sites, Attempted Bloggery, takes a look at a recently auctioned later Charles Addams New Yorker cover. See it here.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Charles Addams Born in Westfield, New Jersey , January 7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker publishes his work posthumously. Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981).

In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Website: http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Kim Warp (left) has sent along this memory of meeting Jack Ziegler, who passed away on March 29th of this year:

I admired Jack Ziegler greatly, of course. I only met him one time, at a New Yorker cartoonist’s lunch. I was too intimidated to go talk to him but he came up and introduced himself and was very nice. I managed to say something like, “You’re really good at perspective” to which he just smiled. He was an inspiration to all of us, expanded the possibilities of the form, and was a master draftsman, which is what I was trying to say.

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Lee Lorenz On James Stevenson; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“Postscript: James Stevenson”

James Stevenson is remembered by the great cartoonist  Lee Lorenz  who, as The New Yorker‘s  Art Editor guided the magazine’s Art Department (that included the cartoons and the covers) from 1973 through 1993, and then served as Cartoon Editor from 1993 through 1997.  Mr. Lorenz was Mr. Stevenson’s editor from 1973 through 1993.

 

More Stevenson:

…from the Greenwich Times, February 21, 2017,  “James Stevenson, New Yorker Cartoonist, Cos Cob Resident, Dies”

…from The New York Times, February 24, 2017, “James Stevenson, Ex-New Yorker illustrator, Dies at 87” *

*If only someone at The New York Times could change “Ex-New Yorker Illustrator” to “New Yorker Cartoonist” — Mr. Stevenson was first and foremost a New Yorker cartoonist.

UPDATE: The online headline for Mr. Stevenson’s New York Times obit has just been changed to read “New Yorker Cartoonist” …thank you, NYTs!

…Special Note: Attempted Bloggery has been featuring art by Mr. Stevenson all week.  Check it out!

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The latest Cartoon Companion is posted. The two anonymous critics take a close look at the cartoons appearing in the issue of February 27th.  A new rating system is in effect.

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Cartoon Companion: Rating New Yorker Cartoons & Beyond; Peter Arno & Football; A Former New Yorker Editor Dies

 

 

 

 

Max and Simon, the mysterious duo behind Cartoon Companion have released this mission statement to Ink Spill:

The Cartoon Companion — www.cartooncompanion.com — is a website devoted to the latest cartoons in The New Yorker magazine. With each new issue, your genial hosts, Max and Simon, offer their highly subjective insights and rate the cartoons on a scale of 1 (not worthy) to 6 (genius!). Future posts will include interviews with New Yorker cartoonists and guest commentary by some of the best in the business, plus cartoons by New Yorker cartoonists that the magazine inexplicably rejected.  

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Here’s a just in time for the Super Bowl football-related post from Attempted Bloggery, featuring Peter Arno‘s work.

See it here.

 

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and finally…a non-cartoonist New Yorker-related note:  Alexander Chancellor has died at age 77. There are plenty of obits to be found (here’s  The Washington Post’s).

Mr. Chancellor, hired by Tina Brown, turned his short stint at The New Yorker into a book, Some Times in America: And A Life In A Year at The New Yorker.  Not a bad read if you feel like re-visiting, or visiting the Tina New Yorker years (if you’re in that kind of mood, I’d  also suggest the late E.J. Kahn’s book, Year of Change: More About The New Yorker & Me.  For William Shawn vintage Kahn,  there’s his About The New Yorker & Me. I could go on with other titles of interest — perhaps another post another time.