The Tilley Watch Online: June 11-16, 2018; More Arthur Getz (at The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon)

Yet another Trumpian week for the Daily Cartoon. 

The participating cartoonists:  Danny Shanahan, one of the magazine’s modern masters, appeared twice in the week, with his second a nod to the climbing racoon we all fell in love with; Lars Kenseth, whose one-of-a-kind drawings also appeared twice (neither was a racoon drawing, unfortunately), and Lisa Rothstein, possibly making her Daily debut (someone please advise if this is incorrect).

And the Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Tom Chitty Jeremy Nguyen with David Ostow, Liana Finck, and honorary New Yorker cartoonist, Colin Stokes (he’s the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, and… he’s co-written a published New Yorker cartoon or two).

You can see all of the above work, and more, here.

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More Arthur Getz

I recently drove over to Sharon, Connecticut to catch the Arthur Getz exhibit at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon. It runs til the end of this month, so hurry and go before it’s gone! One of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists, Peter Steiner, joined me to tour the art on the walls, including the original art for the terrific cover shown above. This is a large piece (my guess is it’s about a yard tall), graphically powerful as a cover and even more so when you’re up close to the original (it’s currently hanging along a staircase). There are a number of other originals like it (in the wow category), but also a good number of small pieces (many “killed” covers) as well as some pastoral watercolors. Many of the pieces are for sale. A portfolio of work sits in one of the rooms — you can breeze through and pick up the original art for as close a look as you want.

Getz’s New Yorker work really shines through in this show. Mr. Steiner and I spent some time gazing at them, marveling at Getz’s ability to grasp the big picture so beautifully. I’m reluctant to label any specific period of The New Yorker as golden or aluminum or silver, or whatever, but as Mr. Getz’s career spanned 50 years (1938-1988)  his work certainly was being published during the magazine’s so-called Golden Age.

As mentioned on the Spill not long ago there’s a companion exhibit at the nearby Moviehouse in Millerton (NY) featuring much more of Getz’s New Yorker work. You really need to see that too (it runs through the end of August).

Visiting the Arthur Getz Exhibit

Yesterday’s opening for The Arthur Getz exhibit at the Moviehouse in Millerton, New York (just seconds from the Connecticut state line) was a lot of fun.  Thirty original Getz New Yorker covers are on the walls.  The first pieces greet you in the theater’s lobby, within sight of the popcorn machine (I liked this touch). The rest of the work is found in several exhibit spaces up the stairs on the second floor.  Mr. Getz worked large (his daughter told me he began working smaller later in his career — a few of those later pieces are shown).  

I found myself leaning close-in to each and every piece. The colors are as brilliant as the day they were applied. Mr. Getz’s subject matter ranged from city to country (it was suggested in reading material that Getz’s interests followed his own migration from city living to country living).  Whether city or country, the energy of the work is tremendous, and, of course, beautiful.

If you’re in the vicinity of Millerton, go see this show.

Link here to the Arthur Getz website,

 

 

 

Events of Interest: Edward Koren, Arthur Getz

Work by Edward Koren at the BigTown Gallery

 “Bearing Witness” an exhibit of recent lithographs by Edward Koren, is now up at the BigTown Gallery (in Rochester, Vermont) and runs through June 16th.  Info here.

Note: There will be a Q & A with Mr. Koren at the Gallery on June 3rd at 4pm.

Mr. Koren’s website.

Edward Koren’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Edward Koren ( photo above, Fall 2016, courtesy of Gil Roth) Born, 1935. New Yorker work: May 26, 1962 — . Key collections: Do You Want To Talk About It? ( Pantheon, 1976), Well, There’s Your Problem (Pantheon, 1980), Caution: Small Ensembles (Pantheon, 1983).

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An Exhibit of Work by Arthur Getz

Work by the late Arthur Getz will be on display in Millerton, New York. According to the Moviehouse website:

The show will feature thirty of Getz’s original cover paintings, covering the span of Getz’s work from the 1950’s through to the 1980’s. The works for this extraordinary exhibition have been generously loaned to The Moviehouse by Getz’s family and are not for sale.

Arthur Getz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913; died, 1996. New Yorker work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published, and one cover). According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

Exhibit of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Arthur Getz; Review of Interest: Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s New Book; Follow-Up: John Cuneo’s Spring Cover

From The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon, “The Art of Arthur Getz: City and Country” an exhibit of work by the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists.  Opens May 5th.  

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for bringing this exhibit to my attention. Be sure to check out his site today for an interesting piece on Mischa Richter.

Mr. Getz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z: 

Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913; died, 1996. New Yorker work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published, and one cover). According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

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Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s New Book

From Publishers Weekly, April 30, 2018,  “The Wild Woman of Comix” — Leela Corman’s review of Ms. Kominsky-Crumb’s latest book, out today. 

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Follow-Up: John Cuneo’s Spring Cover

Visitors to this site may remember a recent piece, “Favorite Cover Submission of the Week” — featuring the work of New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo.  Happy & pleased to say the cover (slightly revised) has found a home, shown below right, on Chronogram, a splendid Hudson Valley (NY) publication.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of November 6, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

 I think it’s safe to say we have in our hands this week the New Yorker’s official Fall issue what with John Cuneo‘s beautiful giant leaf descending cover. 

For a change, I looked through this week’s issue (the digital issue, of course) on my laptop instead of on my tablet. It’s helpful seeing everything in an immediately readable format instead of having to zoom in, but it also removes a layer of mystery I’ve come to enjoy: seeing the cartoons small, and trying to figure out (sometimes) who did them and guessing what the caption might be. Back to the tablet next week.

Skipping through the front of the magazine, I did pause to admire the illustration on page six by Roman Muradov. It sort of has a Arthur Getz and Eugene Mihaesco mash-up feel — a 1960-ish vibe.  Nice.

Passing by the “redraw” of Rea Irvin‘s  iconic never-shoulda-been-replaced Talk of The Town masthead (above) we get to the first cartoon on page 22, a couple of beavers, courtesy of Kaamran Hafeez.  One of the beavers suffers from an age-old problem that was used to great effect on The Mary Tyler Moore Show when  newsman Ted Baxter read, on air: “I’ve just been handed a bulletin: ‘You have something on your front tooth!'” Curious about whether there was any significance to running a beaver drawing now, I consulted Wikipedia for a snap education. The entry included this:“Maintenance work on the dam and lodges is particularly heavy in autumn.”

Here’s a photo of a beaver, just because:

 Five pages later is a Zach Kanin drawing of a fitting room. I like the louvered fitting room doors, which could easily double for those steel roll-down gates you see on storefronts. Below left: Kanin louvered door.  Right: steel roll-down gate.

Eight pages later a Paul Noth mobster-tinged bar scene based on  “if a tree falls in the forest…” Nice expression on the woodsman’s face.  Good caption. Four pages later an Ed Steed drawing (i.e., dark). Shades of Charles Addams’ kids home from camp drawing

On the very next page, Julia Suits takes us out west to the reliable compound of cowboys at a campfire plus modern technology (I’ve done it myself a few times — it’s an irresistible scenario). Can’t see a cowboy campfire without thinking about Mel Brooks’ classic scene. Three pages later an interesting garage drawing by Ellis Rosen. One of our grandmasters, George Booth did a number of memorable garage drawings. Here’s one (published in the issue of December 28, 1998):

Mr. Booth has had a lot of company over the years. Mr. Ellis gives us a lovely drawing with an excellent caption. And, bonus: it sits well on the page. An Amy Kurzweil drawing is on the very next page.  A chess scenario, perfectly timed for Halloween. I like this drawing, but did find myself pondering why the chess pieces have arms. Are these actual chess pieces dressed up for Halloween, or are they people dressed up in chess pieces for Halloween who have decided to further Halloween-ize their chess costumes? So many questions…

Five pages later a Roz Chast triptych (her preferred construct in recent years). The third panel is a gem.

Six pages later, a Sara Lautman drawing leaning heavily on a pun. Five pages later, appearing just a day after International Cat Day, is an Amy Hwang cat drawing. If you want even more cartoon cat drawings, find these somewhere online or in your favorite used book store:

Five pages later, veteran Mick Stevens brings us back to much earlier times. I’m aware of the cartoon takes of Moses passing by a burning bush (hmmm, that was him, wasn’t it?) and him famously getting hold of the tablets containing the Ten Commandments. But the Biblical-era press conference is new to me.  I note that Moses looks weary.

Three pages later another cartoonist trope: the wedding scene. This one’s by Emily Flake. Understanding the definition of the word “algorithm” as used in the caption is key to understanding this drawing.  Someone should really do a book of New Yorker  dating/mating/algorithm related drawings (there was a dating cartoon in the magazine two weeks ago).

Four pages later, the last drawing in the issue (not counting the caption contest work): a banana peel domestic situation via J.A.K. (Jason Adam Katzenstein). The only thing as funny as someone slipping on a banana peel is someone getting slapped with a pie in the face. Danny Shanahan gave us both:

To see a slideshow of all the cartoons in this week’s issue, go here to the Cartoons page of newyorker.com and scroll down past the Daily Cartoon, Caption Contest to Cartoons from the Issue.

–See you next Monday

 

 

 

   

 

 

Wertz Well Received; Attempted Bloggery with Leo Cullum on the Money, an Original Arthur Getz New Yorker Cover, and Arno in College (Humor)

From the New York Times, October 17, 2017, “A Graphic Novelist’s Passionate Anatomy of New York”  — this review of Julia Wertz’s Tenements, Towers & Trash (with Roz Chast content as well)

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Cullum, Getz and Arno on Attempted Bloggery

Head on over to Attempted Bloggery for an interesting variety of posts on Leo Cullum, Arthur Getz and Peter Arno.