P. G. Garetto Added to the Spill’s One Club; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 9: Mary Gibson; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Talkin’ Bout Art Young

I have Joe Dator’s latest New Yorker cartoon to thank for my coming upon the cartoon shown by P. G. Garetto. Found in the issue of September 3, 1938, this was the first and last time (Ms. or Mr.) Garetto’s work appeared in the New Yorker, thus an immediate qualifier for the Spill’s One Club. The club is limited to cartoonists who have contributed just one drawing to the magazine in their career.  Every member is identified on the Spill’s A-Z by the red top-hatted  fellow you see below. 

But back to Mr. Dator.  After seeing his drawing I wanted to know how many other zebra drawings had appeared in The New Yorker (less than two dozen). I was looking through the magazine’s database when P.G. Garetto’s name showed up.  I knew I’d never seen it before. A further New Yorker database search turned up no other contributions from this artist.  So welcome to the One Club, P.G. Garetto!

I’ve shown some of the text surrounding the cartoon because of the unusual placement of the two dots just above the drawing.  These two dots have been appearing below the magazine’s cartoons every now and then since the magazine began. I’ve never seen them appear above a cartoon,  until now.  Brendan Gill, in his book Here At The New Yorker, wrote about the dots:

“…unless I have been deliberately kept in ignorance of their true meaning throughout all these years, the dots (which can indeed be found under some of our drawings) are, like so many other things in the magazine, vestiges of notions of design that originated in the twenties and that have survived…”

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 9: Mary Gibson

Mary Gibson had a brief run in the New Yorker, with eight drawings published in  seven years.

In Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies, a history of women cartoonists in the New Yorker, she says of Ms. Gibson’s work: “She…began by drawing cartoons about women in the military, which included subjects ranging from the stocking shortage to WACs needing a hairdresser…after the war was over, Gibson’s cartoons looked more like Hokinson imitations and were concerned with insecure, middle-aged women.” 

Dates for these ads: 1950 for the upper row; 1951 for the bottom row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Gibson’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Mary Gibson (self portrait from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) New Yorker work: eight drawings, June 26, 1943 – April 29, 1950.

Note: My thanks to Warren Bernard, the Executive Director of SPX, for allowing Ink Spill access to his collection of advertisements by New Yorker artists.

 

 

 

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

Max and Simon, The Cartoon Companion’s anonymous duo, are back with a look at all the cartoons in the current double issue.  Among the drawings rated and inspected:  a case of leg-cast mistaken identity, concerned neighbors, mystery meat on sale, a musical jury, and an artist working, selectively, in 3-D. Read it all here.

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Talkin’ Bout Art Young

From the New Yorker’s Culture Desk, August 2, 2017,  “Art Young: Cartoonist For the Ages” — this piece by Francoise Mouly and Art Spiegelman in conjunction with the August 1st publication of  That We May Not Weep: The Life & Times of Art Young  (Fantagraphics) by Glenn Bray and Frank M. Young. (Mr. Spiegelman  contributes an essay to the book). 

Here’s Art Young’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Art Young (above) Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, New York City at The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. New Yorker work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch; Attempted Bloggery on Buford Tune; An Art Young Retrospective

…The latest issue of The New Yorker (it’s a double, covering June 5th & June 12th) contains a debut cartoon by  Maddy Dai. Here’s her website.

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After a bunch of fun posts about the cartoonist, William Von Riegen, Stephen Nadler at Attempted Bloggery has focused on yet another New Yorker cartoonist whose name might not be familiar to many of us: Buford Tune.  Mr. Tune is a member of Ink Spill‘s “One Club” (meaning he had just one cartoon published in The New Yorker in his career, in the issue of October 10, 1936). Mr. Nadler shows us several College Humor drawings by Mr. Tune.   Read all about it here.

 

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This upcoming retrospective of Art Young’s work (to be published by Fantagraphics) was mentioned here awhile back, but is worth noting again as the pub date approaches (August 1).  And now there’s a cover to show!

Of further interest: the Art Young Gallery in Bethel Connecticut.

Here’s Mr. Young’s entry on the A-Z:

Art Young (above) Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, NYC @ The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. NYer work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery

 

Book of Interest: An Art Young Anthology

Due March of 2017 from Fantagraphics is an Art Young anthology: To Laugh That We May Not Weep. Art YoungHere’s some info from the publisher:

To Laugh That We May Not Weep is a sweeping career retrospective, reprinting ?often for the first time in 60 or 70 years? over 800 of Young’s timeless, charming, and devastating cartoons and illustrations, many reproduced from original artwork, to create a fresh new portrait of this towering figure in the worlds of cartooning and politics. With essays by Art Spiegelman, Justin Green, Art Young biographer Marc Moorash, Anthony Mourek, and Glenn Bray, with a biographical overview of Young’s life and work by Frank M. Young, To Laugh That We May Weep is a long-awaited tribute to one of the great lost cartoonists whose work is as relevant in the 21st century as it was in its own time.

Link here to read an Art Young appreciation by Art Spiegelman  in Harper’s

 

 

Ink Spill‘s Art Young entry:

Art Young (above)  Born January 14, 1866,  Illinois. Died December 29, NYC @ The Hotel Irving.  An online biography. 1943. NYer work: 1925 -1933.  The Art Young Gallery

Daedalus Books Celebrates The New Yorker’s 90th; More on the Art Young Exhibit

DBooks

 

 

 

 

This is fun: Daedalus Books & Music has gathered together a bunch of New Yorker related books  on its site in honor of the magazine’s 90th birthday. Go see!

 

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AYFrom CTpost.com, March 31, 2015, “Bethel Cartoonist: First Gallery Exhibit Since 1939” — this piece on the Art Young show in Bethel, Connecticut.

Art Young Opening! Plus…The Spill’s Mid-Week Round-up: P.C. Vey, Kominsky-Crumb, Kupperman, Mankoff, Katchor, Sikoryak & Mouly; The New Yorker’s 5th issue Gets a Close Look

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P.C>

P. C. Vey, whose April 15, 2013 New Yorker drawing appears here,  talks about his tools of the trade on A Case For Pencils. Go see!

Link here to Mr. Vey’s website

Link here to see some of his New Yorker work

 

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MOCCA-DAVIS

The Museum of Comic & Cartoon Art has announced its MoCCA Fest 2015 line-up. The list includes a bunch of New Yorkery names, including Ben Katchor, R. Sikoryak, Francoise Mouly, Aline Kominsky-Crumb and Michael Kupperman. A panel on Saul Steinberg is one of the highlights.  The Beat has the all the info.

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Art Young 4:22:30Art Young, whose April 22nd, 1930 New Yorker drawing appears here, will be celebrated big-time, beginning this Friday, March 27th. Back in February, Marc Moorash, curator of the Art Young Gallery told Ink Spill,  “March and April we’re giving Art his first solo show since his exhibition at the ACA Gallery in 1939. We’ll have 40 original illustrations and 120 pieces of ephemera – letters, books, magazines, etc.” Go here for all the information.

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More Spills:

…Attempted Bloggery’s latest post: a close look at The New Yorker’s 5th issue

…Video: The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff & The Harvard Lampoon