Two Blog Posts of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind & Attempted Bloggery

Two favorite New Yorker-related blogs making for fun Saturday reading.

First, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker with its look at the issue of June 30, 1928 featuring the ever pleasing work of Helen Hokinson on the cover. Work shown in the post: Alice Harvey, Al Frueh, and Peter Arno. 

And then there’s Attempted Bloggery, frequently mentioned on the Spill, and for good reason. Stephen Nadler, who runs the site, tirelessly examines all kinds of New Yorker cartoon and cartoonist related angles (original art, auctions, obscurities, etc). Right now he’s looking at the work of Gregory d’Alessio, a somewhat forgotten figure.  Mr. d’Alessio contributed a handful of covers and one cartoon to The New Yorker

Shown above: on the left is the June 30, 1928 New Yorker. On the right, a drawing by Mr. d’Alessio from the May 1937 issue of College Humor.

The Spill’s A-Z entries for cartoonists mentioned:

Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

Gregory d’Alessio (Photo above from College Humor, 1938) Born Sept. 25, 1904, NYC. New Yorker work: 1934 -1940.

Al Frueh (pictured above) Born, Lima, Ohio 1880; died, Sharon, Connecticut, 1968. New Yorker work: 1925 – 1962. Here’s a good piece about Mr. Frueh’s life.

 

 

 

Alice Harvey  (above) Born 1894, Austin, Illinois. New Yorker work: Oct. 17th,1925 – May 1, 1943.

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

 

Fave Photo of the Day: Nurit Karlin and Liza Donnelly; Eldon Dedini’s Concours d’Elegance Posters; Latest Addition to Ink Spill’s Archives: A 1926 New Yorker Advertising Booklet

Below’s a photo of two wonderful New Yorker cartoonists taken this morning in Tel Aviv. On the left is Liza Donnelly (no stranger to the Spill)  and to the right is Nurit Karlin, who we don’t see enough of here.  I think of Ms. Karlin’s work (as I think of Ms. Donnelly’s work) in the Thurber school: a simple line beautifully executing a solid idea.

Here’s Ms. Karlin’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z: Born in Jerusalem. NYer work: 1974 – . Collection: No Comment (Scribner, 1978). For more on Karlin see pp 124 -130 of Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies : The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus Books, 2005)

photo: Daniel Kenet/Gretchen Maslin

 

 

 

 

 

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From Attempted Bloggery, June 4, 2017, “Eldon Dedini: Concours d’Elegance” — Stephen Nadler, who specializes in digging deep, takes a look at some lesser-known  work by the great Mr. Dedini. See it all here.

 

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Tom Bloom, indefatigable collector and illustrator, dropped by the Spill’s world headquarters yesterday, bearing a splendid gift: May we say a few words about our contemporaries” — a 23 page booklet, bound with a string cord,  printed on “nice” paper (that is to say, it’s not lightweight bond).  Aimed at advertisers, it offers a survey of other publications in the New York market (The New York Times, The World, The Herald Tribune, etc.) before finally getting around to the virtues of advertising in The New Yorker. The pages are adorned with a good number of  New Yorker spot drawings by such artists as  Alice Harvey, Hans Stengel, Helen Hokinson, Alan Dunn, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin, who supplies the Eustace Tilleys . 

The copy shown below states the New Yorker had been publishing for a “scant twenty months”  — placing the booklet’s vintage approximately October of 1926. 

My thanks to Tom for this fabulous addition to the archives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Roomful of Cartoonists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As anyone could guess, a home inhabited by two cartoonists is bound to have a lot of cartoons around. Not just our own, but cartoons from our New Yorker family; cartoonists we’ve only known by their work, cartoonists we’ve just met, and cartoonists we’ve known for a very long time.  With the exception of our own work, our walls are covered with framed drawings by all the above, from an unpublished drawing by the relatively new New Yorker contributor, Charlie Hankin (a drawing of a clam on a lawn next to a sign that reads “Beware of Clam”  —  it cracks me up every time I look at it) to Alice Harvey‘s first captioned New Yorker drawing, published in October of 1925.

 

 

 

 

In the photo at the top of this post, from top left, clock-wise, is a New Yorker drawing by Robert Weber, a Gardner Rea drawing, one by Jack Ziegler, and an oddity: a group drawing by Mick Stevens, Mr. Ziegler, Roz Chast and Liza Donnelly.

The Ziegler solo drawing, The Jungle Never Sleeps, hangs closest to my work room doorway; it appeared in The New Yorker as a half-page, July 28, 1980.  It’s just one drawing in a career populated with many many funny and beautiful drawings, but, jeez, what a drawing.  Needless to say, the idea is gold, and funny as hell. Jack went perfectly heavy on the speech balloons. The single line of smoke drifting  up from the campfire changes from a black line to negative space and back to a black line as it moves through the silhouetted jungle to the grey sky.  You can tell he was totally involved in working that out. The fellow who’s come out of the beautifully drawn tent is perfection.  As Jack said to me in an interview last Fall: “…it’s always nice when cartoonists know how to draw so that they can give us something pleasant and fun to look at.”  Well said, well done.

   

“The New Yorker Family Reunion Panel” at Westport Historical Society; Liana Finck signing A Bintel Brief at MoCCA Arts Fest; Bob Mankoff Book Tour Rolls On

NY-albums

“The New Yorker Family Reunion Panel” featuring children of Golden Age New Yorker artists, Alice Harvey, Perry Barlow, Edna Eicke, Arthur Getz and Whitney Darrow, Jr., Saturday, April 12th at The Westport Historical Society. Also on the panel: the children of James Geraghty, the magazine’s Art Editor from 1939 through 1973.  You can find examples of work by the artists on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

 

 

 

 

 

(photo of The New Yorker Albums by Michael Maslin)

 

 

and…

A Bintel Brief

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’d like to secure a copy of Liana Finck‘s soon-to-be-released book, A Bintel Brief, she’ll be at the MoCCA Arts Fest this weekend signing copies.

 

mocca.front.web

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and…

bob

Bob Mankoff, The New Yorker‘s current Cartoon Editor is on the road promoting his new book, How About Never — Is Never Good for You?  This latest report comes from The Princeton Packet.

Westport New Yorker Cover Artists Bios Continued

As promised, here are three more of the eighteen short biographies from the Westport Historical Society exhibit,  Cover Story: The New Yorker in Westport. My thanks again to the WHS for allowing these to be posted here on Ink Spill.

(Photo of Donald Reilly courtesy of Liza Donnelly).

For another look at the exhibit, link here to Attempted Bloggery, where you’ll find photos galore (scroll down for the Westport coverage).

New Yorker’s Golden Age of Art Celebrated in Westport, Connecticut

Chas. Addams & Jim Geraghty South Hampton 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Above: Charles Addams at the wheel, with James Geraghty, The New Yorker‘s Art Editor from 1939 through 1973.  South Hampton, 1947)

 

For those wanting to bathe in the glow of New Yorker covers and art history from the magazine’s Golden Age, there’s no better place this winter than the Westport Historical Society where dual exhibits,  “Cover Story: The New Yorker in Westport and…Can’t Tell a Book by Its Cover”  are currently running (through April 26th).

 

l. to r. Charles Saxon, James Geraghty, Dana Fradon, Whitney Darrow, Jr. at Westport-Longshore Inn Sept. 1982

 

 

 

 

(Left: Charles Saxon, James Geraghty, Dana Fradon, and Whitney Darrow, Jr.  Westport, September, 1982.)

 

 

 

Along with a room full of  blow-ups of New Yorker covers and some original cover art by Garrett Price, Arthur Getz and John Norment,  are informative biographies of each of the 16 artists represented, with photographs of the artists.

As the exhibit’s catalog notes:

Between 1925 and 1989, 16 New Yorker artists living in and around Westport – Weston produced a remarkable 761 covers for The New Yorker, a phenomenon first identified by curator Eve Potts.

From less than 10 per year pre-1939, New Yorker covers by greater Westport artists climbed to a peak of 27 in 1957.

The 16 artists: Garrett Price, James Daugherty, Perry Barlow, Alice Harvey, Helen Hokinson, Edna Eicke, Arthur Getz, Charles Addams, Reginald Massie, Whitney Darrow, Jr., Charles Saxon, Albert Hubbell, Donald Reilly, Mischa Richter, David Preston, and John Norment (thumb-nail bios for those artists in bold can be found on Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z)

 

Geraghty:NYer 1948

 

James Geraghty, seen in the  photograph to the left,  settled with his family in Weston in 1949.  He was the anchor for the concentration of New Yorker art and artists thriving in and around Westport-Weston. The exhibit features a wall of photographs celebrating Mr. Geraghty’s career at the magazine (the photos shown here from the exhibit are courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon)

 

 

(Left: Geraghty in his New Yorker office at 25 West 43rd St. 1948)

Mischa, Weston, 1950s

 

 

Perry Barlow & Lois Smith, 1959

 

 

 

 

(Mischa Richter, at the Geraghty’s.  Weston, Ct. 1950s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Perry Barlow and Lois Smith at the Geraghty’s home, 1959).

 

 

 

Chuck Saxon & Jim Geraghty  New Yorker Office

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Left: Geraghty and Charles Saxon at The New Yorker)