Latest New Yorker Cartoons Dissected; George Booth New Yorker Original Cover Art; Blog of Note… A New Yorker State of Mind: Carolita Johnson’s “This Is The Hand”; Cartoons From The Saturday Evening Post; PR: Blitt, Chast

The Cartoon Companion guys, Max & Simon, are back with their customary dissections of the latest New Yorker cartoons.  Read it all here.

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George Booth New Yorker Original Cover Art

Above is the published Booth cover from February 4, 1974.  To see the original art visit Attempted Bloggery

Don’t forget! An exhibit of Mr. Booth’s work just opened yesterday at the Society of Illustrators (the opening reception is tomorrow night).   _________________________________________________________________

Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind

It’s always a treat to get away from 2017 for awhile and visit A New Yorker State of Mind.  This latest post explores the September 1, 1928 issue, featuring a cover by the one of the magazine’s first stars, Helen Hokinson. See the piece here. 

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Carolita Johnson’s “This Is The Hand”

From newyorker.com‘s Culture Desk October 26, 201 , Carolita Johnson’s “This Is The Hand: A Response To Recent News”

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Cartoons From The Saturday Evening Post

News to me until this morning: The Saturday Evening Post has a cartoon archive of sorts;  unfortunately it’s not a database of all its cartoons — it’s selective and thematic — with just a handful of cartoons per theme.  You’ll see some New Yorker cartoonists (I ran across a number by Chon Day and at least one by Tom Cheney). Link here

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Note: this new feature on the Spill allows for the opportunity to list items previously lost in the sauce. 

…Barry Blitt’s next stop on his book tour promoting the just released Blitt takes him tonight to Harvard Bookstore. On Sunday he’ll be at Politics & Prose in D.C. Details here.

…a New York magazine piece posted today: “What Roz Chast Can’t Live Without”

 

Fave Book Cover (and Book) of the Week: Buzzi & Steinberg; A New Yorker State of Mind Looks at the Issue of August 25th 1928

Fave Book Cover (and Book) of the Week: Buzzi & Steinberg

Liza Donnelly recently traveled to the west coast of Italy  where she was presented with an award from the  Museo della Satira d della Caricatura. She returned home with a box of cartoon books published over there.  Among them was the book above, Aldo Buzzi & Saul Steinberg: Un’ Amicizia Tra Letteratura, Arte E Cibo (Credito Valtellinese, 2015)The book’s cover shows Steinberg at the wheel with Mr. Buzzi in the back seat.  The photo is dated 1960. It’s a terrific little book (7″ x 10″) packed with photos of Steinberg and company, as well as a lot of the master’s drawings, constructions, and illustrated letters. 

On first seeing the book, I couldn’t help but think of this photo of another iconic artist in a car. Those are Bob Dylan’s feet sticking out of the Rolls Royce.

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New Yorker State of Mind/ Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker: the August 25th, 1928 New Yorker

I’m bowled over by the amount of effort put into every New Yorker State of Mind post.   Read it here

Fave Book Find of the Week: Frueh On The Theatre: 1906 – 1962; Sam Marlow Pencilled; New Yorker Cartoonists in Life & Judge; Signed By The Cartoonist; Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker!

Here’s a wonderful collection of the late great Al Frueh’s theater work for The New Yorker and elsewhere. The New York Times had Al Hirschfeld, The New Yorker had Al Frueh.  Mr. Frueh’s New Yorker colleague, Brendan Gill provides an informative and insightful intro. For more on Mr. Frueh, here’s a Spill piece about him, “The First New Yorker Cartoon” — posted way back in 2011.

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Sam Marlow Pencilled

Sam Marlow, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker May 9, 2016 is the latest subject of Jane Mattimoe’s splendid Case For Pencils blog.  See Mr. Marlow’s tools of the trade here.

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Buchanan’s Files Continue on Mike Lynch’s Site

If New Yorker cartoonists work not published in the New Yorker is your thing, then head on over to Mike Lynch’s site where you’ll find a number of Life and Judge cartoons from the 1930s. All the scans courtesy of Dick Buchanan, including the Ned Hilton drawing above (Life, 1935). Mr. Hilton’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from May 19, 1934 — June 15, 1957.

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Signed By The Cartoonist

Stephen Nagler’s Attempted Bloggery site has been posting signed books by some famous cartoonists, Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, and William Steig among them.  Check them out here.

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Reading Every New Yorker

And speaking of Ms. Hokinson, here’s her beautiful New Yorker cover from the summer of 1928.  The fascinating blog, A New Yorker State of Mind takes a very close look within.  Read it here.

Lists! New Yorker Cartoon Collections & Artists; Latest New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue

It will come as no surprise to Ink Spill visitors that I enjoy lists. “The New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” on this site being one example — the Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists Library” being another. I’ve been a fan of Chris Wheeler’s great website for years (he has been a generous contributor to the Spill’s archive).  Here are two links for New Yorker cartoon afficianados who like things orderly.  James Peterson has posted a list of New Yorker books (collections of cartoons)  as well as a list of New Yorker artists.

About the photo above: I don’t usually stack the Spill‘s collection of New Yorker Albums like that — it would be criminal to do so.  This was a one-time thing. After photographing them, I returned the albums to the safety of a horizontal shelf. If the New Yorker publishes an anthology to celebrate the magazine’s 100th birthday in 2025 — and I can’t imagine they won’t —  I’ll momentarily pile up the albums again and add the new book on the bottom.

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Latest New Yorker State of Mind Post

This particular post, looking at the issue of July 7, 1928, is chock full of cartoons, and as usual, so much more (there’s also a much appreciated shout-out to the Spill).  Read it here.

Two Blog Posts of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind & Attempted Bloggery

Two favorite New Yorker-related blogs making for fun Saturday reading.

First, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker with its look at the issue of June 30, 1928 featuring the ever pleasing work of Helen Hokinson on the cover. Work shown in the post: Alice Harvey, Al Frueh, and Peter Arno. 

And then there’s Attempted Bloggery, frequently mentioned on the Spill, and for good reason. Stephen Nadler, who runs the site, tirelessly examines all kinds of New Yorker cartoon and cartoonist related angles (original art, auctions, obscurities, etc). Right now he’s looking at the work of Gregory d’Alessio, a somewhat forgotten figure.  Mr. d’Alessio contributed a handful of covers and one cartoon to The New Yorker

Shown above: on the left is the June 30, 1928 New Yorker. On the right, a drawing by Mr. d’Alessio from the May 1937 issue of College Humor.

The Spill’s A-Z entries for cartoonists mentioned:

Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

Gregory d’Alessio (Photo above from College Humor, 1938) Born Sept. 25, 1904, NYC. New Yorker work: 1934 -1940.

Al Frueh (pictured above) Born, Lima, Ohio 1880; died, Sharon, Connecticut, 1968. New Yorker work: 1925 – 1962. Here’s a good piece about Mr. Frueh’s life.

 

 

 

Alice Harvey  (above) Born 1894, Austin, Illinois. New Yorker work: Oct. 17th,1925 – May 1, 1943.

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

 

Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind– Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker; Appearance of Interest: Bob Eckstein in Massachusetts; An Otto Soglow Treasure Trove

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How lucky we are that someone has been reading every issue of The New Yorker since its inaugural issue, highlighting and exploring certain aspects of each issue along the way.* I may have mentioned A New Yorker State of Mind some time ago, but it’s time to mention it again. It’s a delight.  See it here.

*Attempted Bloggery was on a similar track awhile back. Fun and fascinating reading.

(Above: A cover by Ilonka Karasz. More here on Ms. Karasz)

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From  The Berkshire Eagle, December 9, 2016, “A Conversation with Matt Tannenbaum” — this piece includes references to Bob Eckstein who will speak about his new book, Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores at Mr. Tannenbaum’s bookstore this coming Thursday.

Eckstein's books

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.

 

 

 

 

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soglow-spots

 

 

From the bookseller, Between The Covers, this offering of 66 Otto Soglow New Yorker spot drawings.  Price: $25,000. That’s only about $380.00 per drawing.  A steal!  See the listing here.

(A bonus: Tom Bloom’s illustrations appear throughout the bookseller’s site).

Mr. Soglow’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Otto Soglow (pictured above) Born, Yorkville, NY, December 23, 1900. Died in NYC, April 1975. NYer work: 1925 -1974.Key collections: Pretty Pictures ( Farrar & Rinehart, 1931) and for fans of Soglow’s Little King; The Little King (Farrar & Rinehart, 1933) and The Little King ( John Martin’s House, Inc., 1945). The latter Little King is an illustrated storybook. Cartoon Monarch / Otto Soglow & The Little King (IDW, 2012) is an excellent compendium.