A Rea Irvin Exhibit Recalled; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Ali Fitzgerald Pencilled

What fun: my three favorite New Yorker cartoon-related sites are present and accounted for today.



More New Yorker art history from Attempted Bloggery, which has unearthed yet another New York Times piece — this time about the spectacular Rea Irvin, who left his fingerprints all over the magazine (and they’re still all over it). I was lucky enough to attend the Irvin exhibit that the Times covered. The Museum of the City of New York did a bang-up job.  I hope they or some other great New York cultural institution has an exhibit in mind for the New Yorker‘s 100th birthday in 2025 (it’s never too early to start planning!).  Here’s the Attempted Bloggery post.

And here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.


The online New Yorker cartoon critics, Max and Simon are back with a look at the drawings in the May 1st issue, which includes a rescued kitty, a couple of snakes, and a police lineup. Read it here. Oh, and the CC’s “Mystery Cartoonist” also makes a short but succinct appearance.


Jane Mattimoe’s  wonderful Case For Pencils blog  is back with the spotlight on Ali Fitzgerald’s tools of the trade.  Ms. Fitzgerald’s work has appeared on the New Yorker‘s Daily Shouts. See the Pencils post here.

Link here for Ms. Fitzgerald’s website



Peter Steiner Pencilled; Jeremy Nguyen Profiled

Peter Steiner, who brought us this classic New Yorker cartoon, tells us about his tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils. Read it here!

Link to Peter Steiner’s website.




Jeremy Nguyen, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker this past February, is the subject of this brief profile in Bedford + Bowery.

Link to Jeremy Nguyen’s website.

Helen Hokinson on A Case For Pencils; A “New” Cartoonist from 1999; Swann Galleries New Yorker Cartoon Offerings

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils post features the late very great Helen Hokinson. Take a look!

Ms. Hokinson’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)


This morning while revisiting Thomas Kunkel’s Man In Profile: Joseph Mitchell of The New Yorker (Random House, 2015), I came across a passage about  former New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb speaking of his meetings with Mr. Mitchell. The source of the quote led me to the 1999  New Yorker anniversary issue (with an Edward Sorel cover. Eustace Tilley was relegated to a small box on the advertising flap partially obscuring the cover) where Mark Singer’s “Joe Mitchell’s Secret” appears.  On the way to Mr. Singer’s piece I came upon a cartoon by a cartoonist that somehow missed my attention while compiling Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:   Ham Khan.

This is the first and only appearance (at this date) by Ham Khan in the magazine. The number of new cartoonists brought in by Bob Mankoff since he became Cartoon Editor has risen to 129.

Ink Spill will eventually take a close look at how this influx of cartoonists compares to Mr. Mankoff’s predecessors, James Geraghty (1939-1973) and Lee Lorenz (1973-1997).





The Swann Galleries latest catalog is online.  It’s much fun for those who love original cartoon and cover art from The New Yorker.

Shown here: a gorgeous cover by Arthur Getz.

Mr. Getz’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913;  died, 1996. NYer work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career  was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published,  and one cover).    According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/