Helen Hokinson on A Case For Pencils; A “New” Cartoonist from 1999; Swann Galleries New Yorker Cartoon Offerings

Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils post features the late very great Helen Hokinson. Take a look!

Ms. Hokinson’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956)

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This morning while revisiting Thomas Kunkel’s Man In Profile: Joseph Mitchell of The New Yorker (Random House, 2015), I came across a passage about  former New Yorker editor, Robert Gottlieb speaking of his meetings with Mr. Mitchell. The source of the quote led me to the 1999  New Yorker anniversary issue (with an Edward Sorel cover. Eustace Tilley was relegated to a small box on the advertising flap partially obscuring the cover) where Mark Singer’s “Joe Mitchell’s Secret” appears.  On the way to Mr. Singer’s piece I came upon a cartoon by a cartoonist that somehow missed my attention while compiling Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:   Ham Khan.

This is the first and only appearance (at this date) by Ham Khan in the magazine. The number of new cartoonists brought in by Bob Mankoff since he became Cartoon Editor has risen to 129.

Ink Spill will eventually take a close look at how this influx of cartoonists compares to Mr. Mankoff’s predecessors, James Geraghty (1939-1973) and Lee Lorenz (1973-1997).

 

 

 

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The Swann Galleries latest catalog is online.  It’s much fun for those who love original cartoon and cover art from The New Yorker.

Shown here: a gorgeous cover by Arthur Getz.

Mr. Getz’s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913;  died, 1996. NYer work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career  was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published,  and one cover).    According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

 

 

Blitt and Kuper on Society of Illustrators Panel; Gil Roth Roth Interviews Glen Baxter; Another Look at Abner Dean; Felipe Galindo In Conference on Political Satire in Latin America; A Case For Pencils’ Pencils

 

 

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Last Minute Notice!

“Can Art Affect Social Change?”  Barry Blitt and Peter Kuper, among others, will discuss tonight at The Society of Illustrators.  Details here

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Check out Gil Roth’s wonderful interview with Glen Baxter on Mr. Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast here.

(Mr. Baxter talks about coming to The New Yorker in the Robert Gottlieb era).

While on the Virtual Memories site also be sure to take a look at past episodes, especially the long list of cartoonists (full disclosure, this cartoonist is among those listed).

 

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dean jacket.inddFrom New York Review Comics comes a new edition of Abner Dean’s What Am I Doing Here? originally published in 1947.  Read Mark Frauenfelder’s piece on it here on Boing Boing.

Here’s Mr. Dean’s entry on Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC.  According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.”  He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven  (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960. 

 

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71440 Felipe Galindo  (aka Feggo) is participating in  Bitter Laughter: A Conference on Political Satire and Press Freedom in Latin America — a conference taking place in New York City this coming Saturday:  Details here.

 

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a-case-for-pencils-logoJane Mattimoe, who runs the wonderfully informative blog, A Case For Pencils, wherein New Yorker cartoonists share their tools of the trade, is sharing her own tools of the trade this week.  Check it out here.

Lee Lorenz in Conversation with Edward Sorel; Kuper Pencilled & Panelled

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Two heavy hitters, Lee Lorenz and Edward Sorel will share a stage on September 26th for an event billed “Drawing Sides: A Timely Conversation on Political Cartoons”   Details here.

 

 

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Peter Kuper joins a very long list of New Yorker artists who’ve told us about their chosen tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s terrif blog, A Case For Pencils. Read it here.

 

And speaking of Mr. Kuper, he’ll be appearing on a panel tonight at the New York Academy of Art. The discussion will center on the history and future of MAD magazine. nyaof-art-mad