The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker, October 9, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

The New Yorker has gone through a number of survivable events in its 92 year history. It nearly folded in its first six months of existence, but survived when Raoul Fleischmann, its original backer, suddenly turned white knight, decided to pump more money into it. The magazine survived when the magazine’s founder and first editor Harold Ross died too soon.  The magazine survived its transition from the Fleischmann family to the Newhouse family in the late 1980s, and all the hooplah that ensued when William Shawn was succeeded by Robert Gottlieb, and when Gottlieb was in turn succeeded by Tina Brown, who was then succeeded by its current editor, David Remnick.  It won’t go without saying that yesterday’s news of the passing of Si Newhouse, owner of The New Yorker caused a lot of ink to begin flowing (online as well as print) about what his passing means for the future of the magazine.  Perhaps it’s best to acknowledge that the crystal ball is cloudiest just when we want it to be crystal clear. 

And now on to the cartoons in the latest issue.  

Two BEK covers in the last six issues of The New Yorker. Amazing. I’m always thrilled to see a cartoonist colleague’s work on the cover, and am ever hopeful more and more will be added into the mix.

Following all the up front of the book graphics (ads, of course, and illustrations) we come to the calm spread of pages 28 & 29 with a well placed Liana Finck drawing on the upper right.  I like the use of the word “monsters” in the caption.  I think the word has also suggested (at least to me) that the fellow Ms. Finck has pictured resembles ever-so-slightly the Frankenstein monster (as played by Boris Karloff).  

Six pages later we come to a Jon Adams drawing (his first New Yorker cartoon appeared last week).  The desert island cartoon, once seemingly on the verge of retirement is as present as ever in the magazine.  I’ll be curious as to how the Cartoon Companion guys dissect this drawing (we’ll find out later in the week when they post). I’m reluctant to step on their turf, but can’t help but be concerned that the angle of the palm tree which is about to catapult one of the islanders into the ocean (presumably to safety) will throw the fellow away from the container ship off in the distance. This is part of what cartoonists do, I guess.  We worry about the fate of stranded cartoon characters on a cartoon desert island.

On the very next page is a Michelangelo moment courtesy of Julia Suits.  Her drawing is based on one of the master’s greatest hits within one of his greatest hits:  the “Creation of Adam” (seen below) on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Ms. Suits has given us the origin story of a slightly shocking moment we’ve all experienced at one time or another. 

A couple of pages past the beginning of a Janet Malcolm piece on Rachel Maddow we come to a two-fer spread: an Edward Koren drawing on the left side and a Matthew Diffee on the right. Mr. Koren is our longest serving cartoon contributor, having first been published in 1962. It’s always a good week when one of his drawings graces the pages of the magazine. Selfishly, I would’ve loved to see this drawing run at least half-a-page.  But as the Rolling Stones so memorably sang, “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometime you find you get what you need.” 

A quartet of pages later we come to a drawing by newbie, Maddie Dai; the drawing itself carries a candidate for longest caption in a New Yorker cartoon.  I think of George Booth when I see a lot of caption. Here’s an example of a long-form  Boothian caption from The New Yorker, February 18th,  1985:

Strangely enough, on the page following Ms. Dai’s fortune teller drawing is another longish captioned drawing — this one by David Sipress. I like the whiskerless cat(?) on the floor of this drawing.  It looks a bit distressed. Four pages later a Roz Chast triptych incorporating the word “illuminati”;  I’m beginning to get the feeling this issue is thematic in a mystical, monstrous, space agey way (Ms. Finck’s monster, Ms. Suits Michelangelo drawing, Maddie Dai’s fortune teller, Mr. Sipress’s a newly discovered planet drawing, and now Ms. Chast’s illuminati).  Probably just coincidence. 

Two pages later, the theme goes up in smoke as P.C. Vey takes us shopping. I note that none of the products on the shelves carry labeling. I’m reminded of the books in Chairman Mao’s library. On closer inspection, there is writing present on Mao’s books, but the first impression is similar (for me anyway) to Mr. Vey’s supermarket shelving.   

On the very next page after Mr. Vey’s shopping expedition we’re thematically back to religion with an Adam and Eve drawing courtesy of Will McPhail.  I suppose it’s possible it’s not Adam and Eve as the female here has to my eyes a contemporary haircut. You can’t see much of Adam, as he’s behind a giant leaf that doesn’t quite cover the “all”  mentioned in his caption. Someone who knows leaves can set me straight if Mr. McPhail’s leaf is similar to this maple leaf I grabbed off of Google images.  

 

A couple pages later another relative newbie, Kate Curtis (her first drawing appeared in the New Yorker in January of 2016).  Back to contemporary life with an airline check-in moment. The drawing looks vaguely Kim Warpian (it’s the airline employee’s fingers I think that bring Ms. Warp’s work to mind). Seven pages later we’re whip-lashed back to King Arthur’s big sword in the stone moment with a contemporary twist, courtesy of Ben Schwartz. Lars Kenseth had a sword and stone drawing recently. I wonder if sword and stone drawings are going to give desert island drawings a run for their money.

Nine pages later, we remain (somewhat) in ancient times with a couple of medieval towers (sans Rapunzel…possibly), and a dragon…and a lawn mower?  All from Avi Steinberg’s pen. This drawing reminds me of the George Price classic below (published in The New Yorker June 3, 1939).  Both Mr. Steinberg’s and Mr. Price’s have guys outdoors doing something in the yard; both have woman in the window calling out to the guys; both have something wrapped around a structure: Mr. Steinberg has a dragon, Mr. Price has ivy.

On the following page a talking clock from Eric Lewis. I’m always reluctant to favor a drawing in the Monday Tilley Watch (again, that’s what they do over on the Cartoon Companion site), but I’m going to favor this, the last drawing in the issue. I see shades of various artists in the drawing itself — this isn’t unusual: I see some vague hint of various cartoonists’ work in every cartoonist’s drawing (including my own). In this case it’s a little Stuart Leeds, a little Gahan Wilson, and a shadow of Pierre Le-Tan.  Of course, the drawing itself is pure Eric Lewis — an excellent way to end the issue. 

— see you next week.   

 

 

 

 

S.I. Newhouse Jr.: 1927 – 2017

 The New York Times has reported that S.I. Newhouse has died at age 89. 

Here’s the opening to the Times piece, written by Jonathan Kandell:

S.I. Newhouse Jr., who as the owner of The New Yorker, Vogue, Vanity Fair, Architectural Digest and other magazines wielded vast influence over American culture, fashion and social taste, died on Sunday at his home, a family spokesman said. He was 89.

 The New York Times obit here.

The New Yorker’s editor David Remnick on Mr. Newhouse

Vanity Fair‘s Graydon Carter on Mr. Newhouse

More stories will be posted here during the coming days.

(photo above from a 1988 piece on Mr. Newhouse.  Photo by Neil Boenzi).

Book Launch Reminder: Wertz’s Tenements,Towers & Trash; Books Of Interest: R. Crumb: From the Underground to Genesis; Cartoon County: My Father and His Friends in the Golden Age of Make-Believe

Book Launch Reminder: Wertz’s Tenements, Towers & Trash

A book launch for Ms. Wertz’s book will be held October 5th at the Powerhouse Arena. All the info here! Joining Ms. Wertz will be two New Yorker colleagues, Emily Flake and Liana Finck

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 R. Crumb: From the Underground to Genesis

Due December 26th, 2017 from IDW Publishing, R. Crumb: From the Underground to Genesis.  

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Cartoon County

From F,S & G in November, Cartoon County. An excerpt of this book recently appeared in Vanity Fair.  The author, Mr. Murphy, is the editor at large at that publication.

From Publisher’s Weekly: “Immensely evocative . . . [Murphy] writes with a personable mix of affection and realism that offers a vivid sense of what it was like to . . . be a working cartoonist in the decades following WWII.”

 

Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro; Blog of Interest: New Yorker State of Mind; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons; More Bloggery

Interview of Interest: Roxie Munro

From the blog Smack Dab in the Middle, this interview with Ms. Munro who contributed some spectacular covers to The New Yorker, including the one above.

Link here to her website.

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Blog of Interest: A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker

An irresistible site if you love getting in the New Yorker weeds. As you can see the issue in the spotlight this week is dated August 4, 1928.  Cover by Julian de Miskey. Read it here.

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

And now back to the future…the Cartoon Companion boys, “Max” & “Simon” look closely at the brand new cartoons in the brand new issue of The New Yorker. Cartoons with salt, sharks, wax, thuggery, punch, groceries dissected.  Read it here.

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More Hef: Playboy Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons

Thanks to a Facebook post by Mort Gerberg yesterday I was alerted to this brand new book published in late August by Beaufort Books, Playboy Laughs: The Comedy, Comedians and Cartoons of Playboy.  According  to Mr. Gerberg, the book includes interviews with Arnold Roth, Jules Feiffer, Mike Williams, Don Orehek, Al Jaffee and Mr. Gerberg. 

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More Bloggery

Stephen Nadler over at Attempted Bloggery continues providing a look into New Yorker cartoon auction art and ephemera.  Today it’s sheet music from Murray Anderson’s 1929 Almanac (and an Arno Camel ad in the show’s Playbill). Scroll on down the post and you’ll see an auctioned Eldon Dedini original and an incredible horde of originals for a 1937 Macy’s ad campaign by Gregory d’Allesio.  Fascinating stuff all.  See it here

Rabbit At Rest: Hugh Hefner 1926-2017

Hugh Hefner, cartoonist turned mogul, died yesterday in California.  For quite some time his creation, Playboy Magazine was the alternate universe for a good number of New Yorker cartoonists.  Beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s with other major cartoon markets folding, Playboy became the next best place for cartoonists to take their work;  the decision to bring one’s cartoons there was, for most, economic, not editorial.  Editorially, Playboy was definitely not the New Yorker (the best place to take one’s work) but it had in common with the New Yorker a number of elements attractive to cartoonists: the pay was good –second only to The New Yorker, and there was an orderly editorial system in place thanks to the steady presence of Michelle Urry, who presided as cartoon editor. Like the New Yorker, Playboy had a stable of cartoonists, some contracted with the magazine.  As a monthly, the decision-making process wasn’t as fast-paced as the weekly New Yorker;  the process further slowed by the need for all work to be approved by Mr. Hefner, the magazine’s founder and editor-in-chief, who wasn’t in the magazine’s headquarters in Manhattan, but out west, living his well- publicized Hollywood dream.

There was plenty of spill-over from the New Yorker‘s stable to Playboy‘s, especially in the back of the book, where single panel cartoons were most prominent (full color, full-page cartoons by Playboy regulars threaded through the magazine).  Hefner’s tastes in cartoons bore the stamp of his younger days; much of the magazine’s anchor material (those color pages) curiously kept that Eisenhower era look and feel well beyond the 1950s.

It was headline news when Playboy briefly ceased using cartoons (and abandoned nude photographs of women) but less newsworthy when both returned.  There is at this point in time no next best place for cartoonists to bring their work once it’s been rejected by The New Yorker.  Several eras of cartoonists were buoyed by Hefner’s magazine, itself a curio that perhaps could only have been dreamed up by a cartoonist.