The Talk of The Town’s Tom Bachtell is Pencilled; Liza Donnelly: “Cartooning the New President”; From the Spill’s Library: Another Spot Artist

Tom Bachtell, whose wonderful spot drawings are featured weekly in the New Yorker‘s Talk of The Town section is the subject of Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils this week.  Check it out here.

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Liza Donnelly on drawing the new President (with a selection of her latest cartoons). See it here

 

 

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As long as the subject of New Yorker Spot artists has come up  (with Mr. Bachtell’s work) here’s a little something from the Spill‘s archives:  Suzanne Suba was one of the very few  New Yorker spot artists to have her work collected in book form.  Below is an example of her art from the lovely little (4″x5″) book titled, Spots by Suba: From The New Yorker (E.P. Dutton & Co. 1944).  Ms. Suba passed away in  2012

 

 

Blitt’s Blitt Cover Revealed; The Tilley Watch: New Yorker’s Managing Editor Profiled

For awhile now, the cover for Barry Blitt‘s upcoming anthology (shown below, with the title and author’s name floating in all that white space) ever-so-slightly resembled, in its simplicity, later editions of the Beatles so-called White Album (later editions added a little gray to the words “The Beatles” on an otherwise all white field).  But now, as you can see to the left,  we have something more to look at. The book is due mid-to-late October, Riverhead Books is the publisher.

 

 

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From The Wesleyan Argus, April 10, 2017, “Emily Greenhouse ’08 Flourishes as Managing Editor of The New Yorker” 

 

Attempted Bloggery Looks at an Addams Cover; Kim Warp on Meeting Jack Ziegler

One of my go-to New Yorker-related sites, Attempted Bloggery, takes a look at a recently auctioned later Charles Addams New Yorker cover. See it here.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Charles Addams Born in Westfield, New Jersey , January 7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker publishes his work posthumously. Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981).

In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Website: http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Kim Warp (left) has sent along this memory of meeting Jack Ziegler, who passed away on March 29th of this year:

I admired Jack Ziegler greatly, of course. I only met him one time, at a New Yorker cartoonist’s lunch. I was too intimidated to go talk to him but he came up and introduced himself and was very nice. I managed to say something like, “You’re really good at perspective” to which he just smiled. He was an inspiration to all of us, expanded the possibilities of the form, and was a master draftsman, which is what I was trying to say.

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Liana Finck’s “Rage Poses”; Robert Sikoryak Speaks

From newyorker.com’s Daily Shouts, April 7, 2017, Liana Finck’s “Rage Poses”  Ms. Finck’s work sometimes reminds me, in a very good way,  of the earliest New Yorker Thurber drawings.Below, on the left is Thurber’s very first drawing in the magazine, January 31, 1931, and on the right, one of his illustrations from the 1929 book he co-wrote with E.B. White, Is Sex Necessary?

 

 

 

 

 

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Robert Sikoryak, whose latest book, Terms and Conditions has a bit of buzz surrounding it,  will speak at RIT on April 12th. Details here.

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; R.C. Harvey’s Lengthy Look at Gluyas Williams

 

 

 

 Click here to see the new Cartoon Companion  where you’ll find a considered (and rated) assessment of all the cartoons in the latest New Yorker.  As usual, a Mystery Cartoonist is along for the fun.  You’ll also run across an un-mysterious me prattling on about my drawing in this issue, which began life, Thurber-ish, with a seal in a living room:

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From The Comics Journal, April 3, 2017, “Gluyas Williams: Master of Line and Shape and Subject” — R. C. Harvey looks at one of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists.  

Left: A 1929 collection of Mr. William’s work

Here’s the Gluyas Williams entry on the Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

Gluyas Williams (photo above) Born, San Francisco, 1888. Died, Boston, Mass., 1982. One of the pillars of Harold Ross’s stable of artists, and one of Ross’s favorite cartoonists. His beautiful full page drawings were a regular feature in the magazine. Mr. Williams illustrated a number of Robert Benchley’s collections, providing the cover art as well as illustrations. NYer work: March 13, 1926 – Aug 25, 1951. Key collections: The Gluyas Williams Book ( Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1929), The Gluyas Williams Gallery (Harper, 1956). Website: http://www.gluyaswilliams.com/

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A Note to Ink Spill Visitors:

As Ink Spill  approaches its tenth birthday in August, it’s undergoing its first sprucing up: a new heading here and there (“Sections” & “Posts” for instance), a slightly less cramped look making for an easier read, perhaps some shifting of content. All the major sections (The A-Z, The Library, In the Attic)  will remain, with a few minor ones saying bye-bye.  

 

 

 

 

A Roomful of Cartoonists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As anyone could guess, a home inhabited by two cartoonists is bound to have a lot of cartoons around. Not just our own, but cartoons from our New Yorker family; cartoonists we’ve only known by their work, cartoonists we’ve just met, and cartoonists we’ve known for a very long time.  With the exception of our own work, our walls are covered with framed drawings by all the above, from an unpublished drawing by the relatively new New Yorker contributor, Charlie Hankin (a drawing of a clam on a lawn next to a sign that reads “Beware of Clam”  —  it cracks me up every time I look at it) to Alice Harvey‘s first captioned New Yorker drawing, published in October of 1925.

 

 

 

 

In the photo at the top of this post, from top left, clock-wise, is a New Yorker drawing by Robert Weber, a Gardner Rea drawing, one by Jack Ziegler, and an oddity: a group drawing by Mick Stevens, Mr. Ziegler, Roz Chast and Liza Donnelly.

The Ziegler solo drawing, The Jungle Never Sleeps, hangs closest to my work room doorway; it appeared in The New Yorker as a half-page, July 28, 1980.  It’s just one drawing in a career populated with many many funny and beautiful drawings, but, jeez, what a drawing.  Needless to say, the idea is gold, and funny as hell. Jack went perfectly heavy on the speech balloons. The single line of smoke drifting  up from the campfire changes from a black line to negative space and back to a black line as it moves through the silhouetted jungle to the grey sky.  You can tell he was totally involved in working that out. The fellow who’s come out of the beautifully drawn tent is perfection.  As Jack said to me in an interview last Fall: “…it’s always nice when cartoonists know how to draw so that they can give us something pleasant and fun to look at.”  Well said, well done.

   

Video of Interest: From 1997, ABC’s Nightline Looks at the New Yorker’s Cartoonists; Sam Gross on Jack Ziegler; The Washington Post’s Michael Cavna on Jack Ziegler’s Pivotal Role at The New Yorker

Way way back in December 1997, ABC’s Nightline broadcast “Drawing Laughter: the Cartoonists of The New Yorker” devoting its entire half-hour time slot to New Yorker cartoons and especially, its cartoonists.  The video from ABC’s vault takes us back to the Tina Brown era, the beginning of Bob Mankoff‘s tenure as cartoon editor (he’d only been at the big desk since August), and the  New Yorker’s first Cartoon Issue. The piece includes footage of the Arnold Newman photo-shoot for the fold-out group photo that appeared in that special issue (and in the Nightline piece), a photo-op at the Algonquin,  as well as short profiles of William Hamilton, Roz Chast and Michael Crawford.  Ted Koppel sitting in a cartoon newsroom is priceless. Among those seen in the piece, if far too briefly, are Mischa Richter, Lee Lorenz, Stuart Leeds, Leo Cullum, Al Ross, Bud Handelsman, Edward Koren, Liza Donnelly, Edward Sorel, Robert Weber, Warren Miller, Charles Barsotti, Frank Cotham, Peter Steiner, Frank Modell, Mick Stevens, Danny Shanahan, Mort Gerberg, Bruce Eric Kaplan, and Sam Gross. Bonus: a quick shot of Jack Ziegler (“It’s kinda quiet in here.”).

For more Ziegler on tape, here’s a link to his appearance with David Letterman, June 20, 1983.

 

 

 

 

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Ink Spill received the following from the great Sam Gross (left) about Jack Ziegler:

   

Jack took a fierce pride in his drawings. On one occasion the art director at Look magazine made the mistake of putting a pushpin in one of them and then mounting it on his cork wall. Every art director in those days had a cork wall. Jack went ballistic and wanted to kill him. I calmed him down by convincing him that the art director would burn in hell for what he did. I’m sure Jack has gone to the place where there are no art directors.

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From The Washington Post‘s Comic Riffs columnist, Michael Cavna: “How Jack Ziegler Became ‘The Godfather’ of The New Yorker’s Modern Wave of Cartoonists”

— Mr. Cavna on how Jack Ziegler midwifed the New Yorker‘s cartoons into its second Golden Age.