Profile of Interest: The “Sistine Chapel of Comic-Strip Art”; Liza Donnelly to Speak at Ireland’s Inspirefest; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“The Sistine Chapel of Comic-Strip Art”

From the New York Times, May 11, 2018, “The Sistine Chapel of Comic-Strip Art” — this piece on a mural of various cartoon characters in a sports bar (James Thurber is mentioned here and there as the sports bar’s lineage includes Costello’s, where Thurber famously drew a mural in the mid 1930s. That mural, restored in 1972*, vanished in 1992**). 

*”Thurber Creatures Live Again in Bar Here,” NYTs,  April 9, 1972

**“Drawing Attention to Great Thurber Heist,” New York Post, November 9, 2005

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Liza Donnelly to Speak at Ireland’s Inspirefest

 “Liza Donnelly on art and activism: ‘Change Comes One Person At a Time'”

–this short piece on Ms. Donnelly as she prepares to head across the pond.

Link here to Liza Donnelly’s website.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” & “Simon” are back with their takes on the cartoons in this week’s New Yorker (the “Innovators Issue”).  The guys dig into drawings of snails, Death, Frankenstein, mice, a mime and more. Joe Dator is awarded Top Toon of the week.  See it all here.

 

 

The Thursday Watch: Ward Sutton Accepts Herblock Prize; King Features Signs Liniers; Conde Nast Consolidates Space/New Yorker to Switch Floors

Ward Sutton Accepts Herblock Prize

From Michael Cavna, The Washington Post“2018 Herblock Prize Winner is Inspired by His Forebears — and Enraged by Trump”–this piece on Ward Sutton’s Library of Congress acceptance speech. Mr. Sutton began contributing to The New Yorker in October 2007.

Mr. Sutton’s website: http://www.suttonimpactstudio.com/

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King Features Signs Liniers

From Todd Allen,  The Comics Beat, May 10, 2018, “King Features Picks Up Argentinian Comic Stirp ‘Macanudo'”— this piece on Liniers, who has contributed covers to The New Yorker.

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Conde Nast Consolidates Space/ New Yorker to Switch Floors

From Keith J. Kelly, The NY Post, April 24, “Conde Nast Looking to Sublease a Third of Its WTC Headquarters” — the New Yorker is mentioned  in the 7th paragraph.

— For a quick  reminder of where The New Yorker started out and where & when it’s moved in its 93 years check out this Spill map.

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Happy 96th, Dana Fradon!; Profile of Interest: George Booth; A Syd Hoff Selection; Hugette Martell in NY Review of Books; Chatfield Chats About Trump

Happy 96th Dana Fradon!

 Very best birthday wishes to Mr. Fradon, our senior New Yorker cartoonist. 

Above, a powerhouse quartet: three New Yorker cartoonists and their editor. Left to right: Charles Saxon, James Geraghty (the New Yorker‘s Art Editor from 1939 – 1973), Dana Fradon, and Whitney Darrow, Jr.  Westport, September, 1982. (Photo courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon).

Mr. Fradon’s entry on the A-Z:

Dana Fradon  Born, Chicago, Illinois, 1922. Studied at the Art Institute of Chicago prior to service in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Following his service, he attended the Art Students League of New York, NYer work: May 1, 1948 – . Collection: Insincerely Yours (Scribners, 1978) To read Ink Spill’s 2013 interview with Mr. Fradon, “Harold Ross’s Last Cartoonist” link here.

— many thanks to David Pomerantz for bringing Mr. Fradon’s birthday to our  attention

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Profile: George Booth

From The Wall Street Journal, “Cartoonist George Booth and His Pet Projects” — this piece on one of the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Gods.

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Dick Buchanan (via Mike Lynch) on Syd Hoff

Dick Buchanan continues to provide us with cartoon clippings (via Mike Lynch’s blog).  This week he’s selected a bundle of work by Syd Hoff.  See it all here. (above: Hoff in True, July 1947)

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Of Interest: Growing Up In Wartime France by Huguette Martel

From the New York Review of Books, “Growing Up in Wartime France”  by Huguette Martel, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1990. 

For more on Ms. Martell see Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons; to see some of Ms. Martel’s New Yorker work go here.

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Audio: Jason Chatfield on Caricaturing Trump

From abc.net, May 8, 2018,  “Aussie New Yorker cartoonist Jason Chatfield on caricaturing Trump”  — this short audio clip. Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year. Visit his website here: https://www.jasonchatfield.com/

 

 

 

Audio/Visuals of Interest: Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Lars Kenseth

Liza Donnelly’s Latest Drawings on CBS This Morning

Here’s CBS News Resident Cartoonist Liza Donnelly’s latest work.

And…she wrote a little something about the piece on her blog 

Ms. Donnelly’s website.

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The Virtual Memories MoCCA Interview with Roz Chast

Gil Roth’s  interviews an awful lot of interesting folks, and thankfully, a good number of them are cartoonists.  Here’s a live interview (they’re all live, aren’t they?) he conducted with Roz Chast at the recent MoCCA Fest in NYC. 

Ms. Chast’s website.

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Lars Kenseth’s Chuck Deuce to Premiere

From Adult Swim:

A half-hour animated masterpiece written by Lars Kenseth about Chuck, Chuck Deuce is about a NorCal slacktivist/surfer who paddles out to carve mavericks, when – GAH-DOOSH! – a giant wave crushes him.

More info here!

Mr. Kenseth’s website.

 

 

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini; The Monday Tilley Watch

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini

Out of the blue, the Monterey Herald posted this fine photo of the late Eldon Dedini under the headline, “Looking Back, Portrait of a Cartoonist”

Here’s Mr. Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. New Yorker work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

And a real treat, mentioned here a long time back: there’s a multi-panel documentary of Mr. Dedini available onYouTubePart 1 here

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The Monday Tilley Watch

The issue of May 14, 2018, The “Innovators Issue”…

Record keeping: here’re the cartoonists in the issue (Liana Finck’s name isn’t below but she is listed on the Table of Contents for a Sketchbook piece titled “Life and Work”).

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead (below) is still in storage.  As the president might say: Sad!

And sorry to bring this up again, but this business of switching from the Irvin typeface on bylines (see below: “By Tad Friend”) strikes me as tweaking something that does not need tweaking. In fact, some newly incorporated design elements need to be un-tweaked. Would you tweak the top of the Empire State Building because you could? I hope not.

 

Below is a heading plucked from the Dec. 3, 2012 issue.  Notice Calvin Trillin’s name set in Irvin type. Now look back up at the byline for Superior Intelligence.  No question which is the superior typeface. 

Ok, back to cartoons, briefly.  If you want a close look at each cartoon in the issue please visit the Cartoon Companion.  They usually post their rated takes for the latest issue at the end of the week. The CC and the Spill are not affiliated, and in fact often disagree on what’s a great cartoon and what’s a dud.  I’ll return to looking closely at cartoons in this space every so often. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personal History: Going To The Window

From 1976 through early 1980 (when I moved out of Manhattan) I made a weekly trip via subway  from my apartment on West 11th Street in Greenwich Village to the New Yorker‘s offices on 25 West 43rd Street.  After a week of working mostly alone at home it was my one big foray into the real world.

Stepping from the 42nd Street subway at Bryant Park, I’d jaywalk across 42nd Street to get to the W.R.Grace building. Its north/south block-wide lobby allowed access to 43rd Street, almost directly across the street from 25 West 43rd.

After pushing through the revolving doors at 25 West 43rd Street, and following an elevator ride to the 18th floor, I’d arrive at my destination: a window.  I’d slip a 10″ x 13″ grey envelope of new drawings through the slot at the base of what appeared to be very thick glass. Behind the glass sat a receptionist. She’d take the new envelope and pass me an envelope of my work submitted (and rejected) the week before. Then I’d get back on the elevator to the main lobby, and retrace my steps home. In all of those years I never spoke to the receptionist (nor she to me), nor did I run into anyone in the hallway (I did however share a down elevator ride with Charles Addams. We didn’t speak).

The window reception was one of many of the magazine’s oddities left behind when the magazine moved south across the street in 1991.  

Below: the window.